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Eating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of two dietary patterns in which carbohydrates and proteins were eaten mostly at lunch or dinner on body weight and composition, energy metabolism, and biochemical markers in overweight/obese men. METHODS: Fifty-eight men (30.0� ±� 7.4� years; 30.8� ±� 2.4� kg/m²) fo... Full description

Journal Title: European journal of nutrition 2014, Vol.53(1), pp.49-60
Main Author: Alves , Raquel Duarte Moreira
Other Authors: De Oliveira , Fernanda Cristina Esteves , Hermsdorff , Helen Hermana Miranda , Abete , Itziar , Zulet , María Ángeles , Martínez , José Alfredo , Bressan , Josefina
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Men
ID: ISSN: 1436-6207
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recordid: faoagrisUS201400145821
title: Eating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men
format: Article
creator:
  • Alves , Raquel Duarte Moreira
  • De Oliveira , Fernanda Cristina Esteves
  • Hermsdorff , Helen Hermana Miranda
  • Abete , Itziar
  • Zulet , María Ángeles
  • Martínez , José Alfredo
  • Bressan , Josefina
subjects:
  • Weight Loss
  • Insulin
  • Homeostasis
  • Body Mass Index
  • Fasting
  • Thermic Effect Of Food
  • Insulin Resistance
  • Biomarkers
  • Low Calorie Diet
  • Dinner
  • Ingestion
  • Overweight
  • Glucose
  • Energy Requirements
  • Fat Free Mass
  • Energy Metabolism
  • Lunch
  • Men
  • Chemical Composition
  • Proteins
ispartof: European journal of nutrition, 2014, Vol.53(1), pp.49-60
description: PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of two dietary patterns in which carbohydrates and proteins were eaten mostly at lunch or dinner on body weight and composition, energy metabolism, and biochemical markers in overweight/obese men. METHODS: Fifty-eight men (30.0� ±� 7.4� years; 30.8� ±� 2.4� kg/m²) followed a covert hypocaloric balanced diet (−10� % of daily energy requirements) during 8� weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: control diet (CT); diurnal carbohydrate/nocturnal protein (DCNP); and nocturnal carbohydrate/diurnal protein (NCDP). Main analyzed outcomes were weight loss, body composition, diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), and glucose/lipid profile. RESULTS: In all groups, a significant decrease in body weight, BMI, and fat mass (kg and %) was verified, without differences between groups. Interestingly, within group analyses showed that the fat-free mass (kg) significantly decreased in NCDP and in CT after 8-week intervention, but not in DCNP. A detrimental increase in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was verified only in DCNP, while NCDP and CT groups presented a non-significant reduction. Moreover, significant differences between DCNP and the other groups were detected for fasting insulin and HOMAIR. After the adjustments, NCDP presented a significantly higher DIT and energy expenditure after lunch, compared with DCNP, but after dinner, there were no differences among groups. CONCLUSION: Eating carbohydrates mostly at dinner and protein mostly at lunch within a hypocaloric balanced diet had similar effect on body composition and biochemical markers, but higher effect on DIT compared with control diet. Moreover, eating carbohydrates mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner had a deleterious impact on glucose homeostasis. ; p. 49-60.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1436-6207
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14366207
  • 1436-6207
url: Link


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titleEating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men
creatorAlves , Raquel Duarte Moreira ; De Oliveira , Fernanda Cristina Esteves ; Hermsdorff , Helen Hermana Miranda ; Abete , Itziar ; Zulet , María Ángeles ; Martínez , José Alfredo ; Bressan , Josefina
ispartofEuropean journal of nutrition, 2014, Vol.53(1), pp.49-60
identifierISSN: 1436-6207
subjectWeight Loss ; Insulin ; Homeostasis ; Body Mass Index ; Fasting ; Thermic Effect Of Food ; Insulin Resistance ; Biomarkers ; Low Calorie Diet ; Dinner ; Ingestion ; Overweight ; Glucose ; Energy Requirements ; Fat Free Mass ; Energy Metabolism ; Lunch ; Men ; Chemical Composition ; Proteins
descriptionPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of two dietary patterns in which carbohydrates and proteins were eaten mostly at lunch or dinner on body weight and composition, energy metabolism, and biochemical markers in overweight/obese men. METHODS: Fifty-eight men (30.0� ±� 7.4� years; 30.8� ±� 2.4� kg/m²) followed a covert hypocaloric balanced diet (−10� % of daily energy requirements) during 8� weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: control diet (CT); diurnal carbohydrate/nocturnal protein (DCNP); and nocturnal carbohydrate/diurnal protein (NCDP). Main analyzed outcomes were weight loss, body composition, diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), and glucose/lipid profile. RESULTS: In all groups, a significant decrease in body weight, BMI, and fat mass (kg and %) was verified, without differences between groups. Interestingly, within group analyses showed that the fat-free mass (kg) significantly decreased in NCDP and in CT after 8-week intervention, but not in DCNP. A detrimental increase in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was verified only in DCNP, while NCDP and CT groups presented a non-significant reduction. Moreover, significant differences between DCNP and the other groups were detected for fasting insulin and HOMAIR. After the adjustments, NCDP presented a significantly higher DIT and energy expenditure after lunch, compared with DCNP, but after dinner, there were no differences among groups. CONCLUSION: Eating carbohydrates mostly at dinner and protein mostly at lunch within a hypocaloric balanced diet had similar effect on body composition and biochemical markers, but higher effect on DIT compared with control diet. Moreover, eating carbohydrates mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner had a deleterious impact on glucose homeostasis. ; p. 49-60.
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titleEating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men
descriptionPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of two dietary patterns in which carbohydrates and proteins were eaten mostly at lunch or dinner on body weight and composition, energy metabolism, and biochemical markers in overweight/obese men. METHODS: Fifty-eight men (30.0� ±� 7.4� years; 30.8� ±� 2.4� kg/m²) followed a covert hypocaloric balanced diet (−10� % of daily energy requirements) during 8� weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: control diet (CT); diurnal carbohydrate/nocturnal protein (DCNP); and nocturnal carbohydrate/diurnal protein (NCDP). Main analyzed outcomes were weight loss, body composition, diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), and glucose/lipid profile. RESULTS: In all groups, a significant decrease in body weight, BMI, and fat mass (kg and %) was verified, without differences between groups. Interestingly, within group analyses showed that the fat-free mass (kg) significantly decreased in NCDP and in CT after 8-week intervention, but not in DCNP. A detrimental increase in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was verified only in DCNP, while NCDP and CT groups presented a non-significant reduction. Moreover, significant differences between DCNP and the other groups were detected for fasting insulin and HOMAIR. After the adjustments, NCDP presented a significantly higher DIT and energy expenditure after lunch, compared with DCNP, but after dinner, there were no differences among groups. CONCLUSION: Eating carbohydrates mostly at dinner and protein mostly at lunch within a hypocaloric balanced diet had similar effect on body composition and biochemical markers, but higher effect on DIT compared with control diet. Moreover, eating carbohydrates mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner had a deleterious impact on glucose homeostasis. ; p. 49-60.
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titleEating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men
authorAlves , Raquel Duarte Moreira ; De Oliveira , Fernanda Cristina Esteves ; Hermsdorff , Helen Hermana Miranda ; Abete , Itziar ; Zulet , María Ángeles ; Martínez , José Alfredo ; Bressan , Josefina
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5Martínez, José Alfredo
6Bressan, Josefina
atitleEating carbohydrate mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner within a covert hypocaloric diet influences morning glucose homeostasis in overweight/obese men
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abstractPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of two dietary patterns in which carbohydrates and proteins were eaten mostly at lunch or dinner on body weight and composition, energy metabolism, and biochemical markers in overweight/obese men. METHODS: Fifty-eight men (30.0� ±� 7.4� years; 30.8� ±� 2.4� kg/m²) followed a covert hypocaloric balanced diet (−10� % of daily energy requirements) during 8� weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: control diet (CT); diurnal carbohydrate/nocturnal protein (DCNP); and nocturnal carbohydrate/diurnal protein (NCDP). Main analyzed outcomes were weight loss, body composition, diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), and glucose/lipid profile. RESULTS: In all groups, a significant decrease in body weight, BMI, and fat mass (kg and %) was verified, without differences between groups. Interestingly, within group analyses showed that the fat-free mass (kg) significantly decreased in NCDP and in CT after 8-week intervention, but not in DCNP. A detrimental increase in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was verified only in DCNP, while NCDP and CT groups presented a non-significant reduction. Moreover, significant differences between DCNP and the other groups were detected for fasting insulin and HOMAIR. After the adjustments, NCDP presented a significantly higher DIT and energy expenditure after lunch, compared with DCNP, but after dinner, there were no differences among groups. CONCLUSION: Eating carbohydrates mostly at dinner and protein mostly at lunch within a hypocaloric balanced diet had similar effect on body composition and biochemical markers, but higher effect on DIT compared with control diet. Moreover, eating carbohydrates mostly at lunch and protein mostly at dinner had a deleterious impact on glucose homeostasis.
pubSpringer-Verlag
doi10.1007/s00394-013-0497-7
eissn14366215