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Marine Ecology: Reaping the Benefits of Local Dispersal

A central question of marine ecology is, how far do larvae disperse? Evidence is accumulating that the probability of dispersal declines rapidly with distance. This provides an incentive for communities to manage their own fish stocks and cooperate with neighbors. ; p. R351-R353.

Journal Title: Current biology 2013, Vol.23(9), pp.R351-R353
Main Author: Buston , Peter m.
Other Authors: D’aloia , Cassidy c.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0960-9822
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recordid: faoagrisUS201500039366
title: Marine Ecology: Reaping the Benefits of Local Dispersal
format: Article
creator:
  • Buston , Peter m.
  • D’aloia , Cassidy c.
subjects:
  • Larvae
  • Fish
  • Probability
  • Marine Science
ispartof: Current biology, 2013, Vol.23(9), pp.R351-R353
description: A central question of marine ecology is, how far do larvae disperse? Evidence is accumulating that the probability of dispersal declines rapidly with distance. This provides an incentive for communities to manage their own fish stocks and cooperate with neighbors. ; p. R351-R353.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 09609822
  • 0960-9822
url: Link


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abstractA central question of marine ecology is, how far do larvae disperse? Evidence is accumulating that the probability of dispersal declines rapidly with distance. This provides an incentive for communities to manage their own fish stocks and cooperate with neighbors.
pubElsevier Inc.
doi10.1016/j.cub.2013.03.056
eissn18790445
date2013-05-06