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Effect of Mannan Oligosaccharide Supplementation on Body Weight Gain and Fat Accrual in C57Bl/6J Mice

The prevalence of obesity in industrialized societies has become markedly elevated. In contrast, model organism research shows that reducing caloric intake below ad libitum levels provides many health and longevity benefits. Despite these benefits, few people are willing and able to reduce caloric i... Full description

Journal Title: Obesity 2010, Vol.18(5), pp.995-999
Main Author: Smith , Daniel L. Jr.
Other Authors: Nagy , Tim R. , Wilson , Landon S. , Dong , Shengli , Barnes , Stephen , Allison , David B.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1930-7381
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recordid: faoagrisUS201600076162
title: Effect of Mannan Oligosaccharide Supplementation on Body Weight Gain and Fat Accrual in C57Bl/6J Mice
format: Article
creator:
  • Smith , Daniel L. Jr.
  • Nagy , Tim R.
  • Wilson , Landon S.
  • Dong , Shengli
  • Barnes , Stephen
  • Allison , David B.
subjects:
  • Mice
  • Industrialization
  • High Fat Diet
  • Oligosaccharides
  • Energy Intake
  • Visceral Fat
  • Obesity
  • Males
  • Food Intake
  • Longevity
  • People
  • Low Calorie Diet
  • Livestock
  • Body Weight Changes
ispartof: Obesity, 2010, Vol.18(5), pp.995-999
description: The prevalence of obesity in industrialized societies has become markedly elevated. In contrast, model organism research shows that reducing caloric intake below ad libitum levels provides many health and longevity benefits. Despite these benefits, few people are willing and able to reduce caloric intake over prolonged periods. Prior research suggests that mannooligosaccharide (MOS or mannan) supplementation can increase lifespan of some livestock and in rodents can reduce visceral fat without reducing caloric intake. Hence, we tested the effect of MOS supplementation as a possible calorie restriction (CR) mimetic (CRM) in mice. C57Bl/6J male mice were fed a high-fat “western” type diet with or without 1% MOS (by weight) supplementation (n = 24/group) from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Animals were housed individually and provided 95% of ad libitum food intake throughout the study. Body weight was measured weekly and body composition (lean and fat mass) measured noninvasively every 3 weeks. Individual fat depot weights were acquired by dissection at study completion. Supplementation of a high-fat diet with 1% MOS tended to reduce total food intake (mean ± s.d.; control (CON): 293.69 ± 10.53 g, MOS: 288.10 ± 11.82 g; P = 0.09) during the study. Moreover, MOS supplementation had no significant effect on final body weight (CON: 25.21 ± 2.31 g, MOS: 25.28 ± 1.49 g; P = 0.91), total fat (CON: 4.72 ± 0.90 g, MOS: 4.82 ± 0.83 g; P = 0.69), or visceral fat (CON: 1.048 ± 0.276 g, MOS: 1.004 ± 0.247 g; P = 0.57). Contrary to previous research, MOS supplementation had no discernable effect on body weight gain or composition during this 12-week study, challenging the potential use of MOS as a CRM or body composition enhancer. ; p. 995-999.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1930-7381
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19307381
  • 1930-7381
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titleEffect of Mannan Oligosaccharide Supplementation on Body Weight Gain and Fat Accrual in C57Bl/6J Mice
creatorSmith , Daniel L. Jr. ; Nagy , Tim R. ; Wilson , Landon S. ; Dong , Shengli ; Barnes , Stephen ; Allison , David B.
ispartofObesity, 2010, Vol.18(5), pp.995-999
identifierISSN: 1930-7381
subjectMice ; Industrialization ; High Fat Diet ; Oligosaccharides ; Energy Intake ; Visceral Fat ; Obesity ; Males ; Food Intake ; Longevity ; People ; Low Calorie Diet ; Livestock ; Body Weight Changes
descriptionThe prevalence of obesity in industrialized societies has become markedly elevated. In contrast, model organism research shows that reducing caloric intake below ad libitum levels provides many health and longevity benefits. Despite these benefits, few people are willing and able to reduce caloric intake over prolonged periods. Prior research suggests that mannooligosaccharide (MOS or mannan) supplementation can increase lifespan of some livestock and in rodents can reduce visceral fat without reducing caloric intake. Hence, we tested the effect of MOS supplementation as a possible calorie restriction (CR) mimetic (CRM) in mice. C57Bl/6J male mice were fed a high-fat “western” type diet with or without 1% MOS (by weight) supplementation (n = 24/group) from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Animals were housed individually and provided 95% of ad libitum food intake throughout the study. Body weight was measured weekly and body composition (lean and fat mass) measured noninvasively every 3 weeks. Individual fat depot weights were acquired by dissection at study completion. Supplementation of a high-fat diet with 1% MOS tended to reduce total food intake (mean ± s.d.; control (CON): 293.69 ± 10.53 g, MOS: 288.10 ± 11.82 g; P = 0.09) during the study. Moreover, MOS supplementation had no significant effect on final body weight (CON: 25.21 ± 2.31 g, MOS: 25.28 ± 1.49 g; P = 0.91), total fat (CON: 4.72 ± 0.90 g, MOS: 4.82 ± 0.83 g; P = 0.69), or visceral fat (CON: 1.048 ± 0.276 g, MOS: 1.004 ± 0.247 g; P = 0.57). Contrary to previous research, MOS supplementation had no discernable effect on body weight gain or composition during this 12-week study, challenging the potential use of MOS as a CRM or body composition enhancer. ; p. 995-999.
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titleEffect of Mannan Oligosaccharide Supplementation on Body Weight Gain and Fat Accrual in C57Bl/6J Mice
descriptionThe prevalence of obesity in industrialized societies has become markedly elevated. In contrast, model organism research shows that reducing caloric intake below ad libitum levels provides many health and longevity benefits. Despite these benefits, few people are willing and able to reduce caloric intake over prolonged periods. Prior research suggests that mannooligosaccharide (MOS or mannan) supplementation can increase lifespan of some livestock and in rodents can reduce visceral fat without reducing caloric intake. Hence, we tested the effect of MOS supplementation as a possible calorie restriction (CR) mimetic (CRM) in mice. C57Bl/6J male mice were fed a high-fat “western” type diet with or without 1% MOS (by weight) supplementation (n = 24/group) from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Animals were housed individually and provided 95% of ad libitum food intake throughout the study. Body weight was measured weekly and body composition (lean and fat mass) measured noninvasively every 3 weeks. Individual fat depot weights were acquired by dissection at study completion. Supplementation of a high-fat diet with 1% MOS tended to reduce total food intake (mean ± s.d.; control (CON): 293.69 ± 10.53 g, MOS: 288.10 ± 11.82 g; P = 0.09) during the study. Moreover, MOS supplementation had no significant effect on final body weight (CON: 25.21 ± 2.31 g, MOS: 25.28 ± 1.49 g; P = 0.91), total fat (CON: 4.72 ± 0.90 g, MOS: 4.82 ± 0.83 g; P = 0.69), or visceral fat (CON: 1.048 ± 0.276 g, MOS: 1.004 ± 0.247 g; P = 0.57). Contrary to previous research, MOS supplementation had no discernable effect on body weight gain or composition during this 12-week study, challenging the potential use of MOS as a CRM or body composition enhancer. ; p. 995-999.
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abstractThe prevalence of obesity in industrialized societies has become markedly elevated. In contrast, model organism research shows that reducing caloric intake below ad libitum levels provides many health and longevity benefits. Despite these benefits, few people are willing and able to reduce caloric intake over prolonged periods. Prior research suggests that mannooligosaccharide (MOS or mannan) supplementation can increase lifespan of some livestock and in rodents can reduce visceral fat without reducing caloric intake. Hence, we tested the effect of MOS supplementation as a possible calorie restriction (CR) mimetic (CRM) in mice. C57Bl/6J male mice were fed a high-fat “western” type diet with or without 1% MOS (by weight) supplementation (n = 24/group) from 8 to 20 weeks of age. Animals were housed individually and provided 95% of ad libitum food intake throughout the study. Body weight was measured weekly and body composition (lean and fat mass) measured noninvasively every 3 weeks. Individual fat depot weights were acquired by dissection at study completion. Supplementation of a high-fat diet with 1% MOS tended to reduce total food intake (mean ± s.d.; control (CON): 293.69 ± 10.53 g, MOS: 288.10 ± 11.82 g; P = 0.09) during the study. Moreover, MOS supplementation had no significant effect on final body weight (CON: 25.21 ± 2.31 g, MOS: 25.28 ± 1.49 g; P = 0.91), total fat (CON: 4.72 ± 0.90 g, MOS: 4.82 ± 0.83 g; P = 0.69), or visceral fat (CON: 1.048 ± 0.276 g, MOS: 1.004 ± 0.247 g; P = 0.57). Contrary to previous research, MOS supplementation had no discernable effect on body weight gain or composition during this 12-week study, challenging the potential use of MOS as a CRM or body composition enhancer.
doi10.1038/oby.2009.308
eissn1930739X