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Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses

Background: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. Objective: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calci... Full description

Journal Title: American journal of clinical nutrition 2015, Vol.101(6), pp.1269-1277
Main Author: Adebamowo , Sally N
Other Authors: Spiegelman , Donna , Willett , Walter C , Rexrode , Kathryn M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
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recordid: faoagrisUS201600086646
title: Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses
format: Article
creator:
  • Adebamowo , Sally N
  • Spiegelman , Donna
  • Willett , Walter C
  • Rexrode , Kathryn M
subjects:
  • Calcium
  • Nurses
  • Magnesium
  • Prospective Studies
  • Cohort Studies
  • Food Intake
  • Women
  • Models
  • Risk
  • Stroke
  • Risk Reduction
  • Meta-Analysis
  • Potassium
  • Minerals
ispartof: American journal of clinical nutrition, 2015, Vol.101(6), pp.1269-1277
description: Background: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. Objective: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II. Design: In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke. Results: During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake. Conclusions: A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women. ; p. 1269-1277.
language: eng
source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00029165
  • 0002-9165
url: Link


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titleAssociation between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses
creatorAdebamowo , Sally N ; Spiegelman , Donna ; Willett , Walter C ; Rexrode , Kathryn M
ispartofAmerican journal of clinical nutrition, 2015, Vol.101(6), pp.1269-1277
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectCalcium ; Nurses ; Magnesium ; Prospective Studies ; Cohort Studies ; Food Intake ; Women ; Models ; Risk ; Stroke ; Risk Reduction ; Meta-Analysis ; Potassium ; Minerals
descriptionBackground: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. Objective: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II. Design: In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke. Results: During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake. Conclusions: A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women. ; p. 1269-1277.
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descriptionBackground: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. Objective: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II. Design: In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke. Results: During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake. Conclusions: A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women. ; p. 1269-1277.
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abstractBackground: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. Objective: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II. Design: In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke. Results: During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake. Conclusions: A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women.
pubAmerican Society for Clinical Nutrition