schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Soy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition

Soybeans provide a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Studies have shown that soy protein can be substituted for animal protein in the diet, and can be used as the sole source of dietary protein. A short review is presented of essential amino acids required in the diet, along with some metabo... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of the American Dietetic Association July, 1991, Vol.91(7), p.828(8)
Main Author: Young, Vernon R.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-8223
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: gale_hrca11120322
title: Soy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition
format: Article
creator:
  • Young, Vernon R.
subjects:
  • Soybean Products -- Health Aspects
  • Amino Acids
  • Human Nutrition
ispartof: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, July, 1991, Vol.91(7), p.828(8)
description: Soybeans provide a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Studies have shown that soy protein can be substituted for animal protein in the diet, and can be used as the sole source of dietary protein. A short review is presented of essential amino acids required in the diet, along with some metabolic studies of the nutritional quality provided by soy protein. The nutritional value of soy protein has been shown to be equal to milk protein in promoting growth in infants and maintaining proper nitrogen balance in children. Studies performed in adults have shown that soy protein has high nutritional value, similar to that of egg and fish protein. Experiments performed in laboratory rats have shown that adding methionine supplements increases the nutritional value of soy protein. However, studies in children and adults have reported that methionine supplements are not necessary and may be undesirable. On the other hand, adding methionine supplements to baby formula containing soy protein may be beneficial. Studies have also shown that soy protein may be useful in low-energy diets used to treat obesity. It is concluded that soy proteins can serve as an excellent source of dietary protein. (Consumer Summary produced by Reliance Medical Information, Inc.)
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-8223
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-8223
  • 00028223
url: Link


@attributes
ID913001011
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid11120322
sourceidgale_hrca
recordidTN_gale_hrca11120322
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid80678875
galeid11120322
display
typearticle
titleSoy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition
creatorYoung, Vernon R.
ispartofJournal of the American Dietetic Association, July, 1991, Vol.91(7), p.828(8)
identifierISSN: 0002-8223
subjectSoybean Products -- Health Aspects ; Amino Acids ; Human Nutrition
descriptionSoybeans provide a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Studies have shown that soy protein can be substituted for animal protein in the diet, and can be used as the sole source of dietary protein. A short review is presented of essential amino acids required in the diet, along with some metabolic studies of the nutritional quality provided by soy protein. The nutritional value of soy protein has been shown to be equal to milk protein in promoting growth in infants and maintaining proper nitrogen balance in children. Studies performed in adults have shown that soy protein has high nutritional value, similar to that of egg and fish protein. Experiments performed in laboratory rats have shown that adding methionine supplements increases the nutritional value of soy protein. However, studies in children and adults have reported that methionine supplements are not necessary and may be undesirable. On the other hand, adding methionine supplements to baby formula containing soy protein may be beneficial. Studies have also shown that soy protein may be useful in low-energy diets used to treat obesity. It is concluded that soy proteins can serve as an excellent source of dietary protein. (Consumer Summary produced by Reliance Medical Information, Inc.)
source
version5
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontribYoung, Vernon R
titleSoy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition.
descriptionSoybeans provide a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Studies have shown that soy protein can be substituted for animal protein in the diet, and can be used as the sole source of dietary protein. A short review is presented of essential amino acids required in the diet, along with some metabolic studies of the nutritional quality provided by soy protein. The nutritional value of soy protein has been shown to be equal to milk protein in promoting growth in infants and maintaining proper nitrogen balance in children. Studies performed in adults have shown that soy protein has high nutritional value, similar to that of egg and fish protein. Experiments performed in laboratory rats have shown that adding methionine supplements increases the nutritional value of soy protein. However, studies in children and adults have reported that methionine supplements are not necessary and may be undesirable. On the other hand, adding methionine supplements to baby formula containing soy protein may be beneficial. Studies have also shown that soy protein may be useful in low-energy diets used to treat obesity. It is concluded that soy proteins can serve as an excellent source of dietary protein. (Consumer Summary produced by Reliance Medical Information, Inc.)
subject
0Soybean products--Health aspects
1Amino acids in human nutrition
general
0Elsevier Science Publishers
1Cengage Learning, Inc.
sourceidgale_hrca
recordidgale_hrca11120322
issn
00002-8223
100028223
rsrctypearticle
creationdate1991
recordtypearticle
addtitleJournal of the American Dietetic Association
searchscopegale_hrca
scopegale_hrca
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, eissn, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleSoy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition.
authorYoung, Vernon R.
creationdate19910701
facets
frbrgroupid5527001599907443968
frbrtype5
creationdate1991
topic
0Soybean Products–Health Aspects
1Amino Acids
2Human Nutrition
collectionHealth Reference Center Academic (Gale)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribYoung, Vernon R.
jtitleJournal of the American Dietetic Association
toplevelpeer_reviewed
frbr
t2
k11991
k200028223
k491
k57
k6828
k7journal of the american dietetic association
k8soy protein in relation to human protein amino acid nutrition
k9soyproteininrelationition
k12soyproteininrelationtohum
k15vernonryoung
k16youngvernonr
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
ranking
booster11
booster21
pcg_typeaggregator
addata
auYoung, Vernon R.
atitleSoy protein in relation to human protein and amino acid nutrition.
jtitleJournal of the American Dietetic Association
risdate19910701
volume91
issue7
spage828
issn0002-8223
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractSoybeans provide a good source of dietary fiber and protein. Studies have shown that soy protein can be substituted for animal protein in the diet, and can be used as the sole source of dietary protein. A short review is presented of essential amino acids required in the diet, along with some metabolic studies of the nutritional quality provided by soy protein. The nutritional value of soy protein has been shown to be equal to milk protein in promoting growth in infants and maintaining proper nitrogen balance in children. Studies performed in adults have shown that soy protein has high nutritional value, similar to that of egg and fish protein. Experiments performed in laboratory rats have shown that adding methionine supplements increases the nutritional value of soy protein. However, studies in children and adults have reported that methionine supplements are not necessary and may be undesirable. On the other hand, adding methionine supplements to baby formula containing soy protein may be beneficial. Studies have also shown that soy protein may be useful in low-energy diets used to treat obesity. It is concluded that soy proteins can serve as an excellent source of dietary protein. (Consumer Summary produced by Reliance Medical Information, Inc.)
pubElsevier Science Publishers
lad01gale_hrca
pages828-835
eissn18783570
date1991-07-01