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Navigating chemical space for biology and medicine

Despite over a century of applying organic synthesis to the search for drugs, we are still far from even a cursory examination of the vast number of possible small molecules that could be created. Indeed, a thorough examination of all 'chemical space' is practically impossible. Given this, what are... Full description

Journal Title: Nature Dec 16, 2004, Vol.432(7019), p.855(7)
Main Author: Lipinski, Christopher
Other Authors: Hopkins, Andrew
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0028-0836
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recordid: gale_hrca186286394
title: Navigating chemical space for biology and medicine
format: Article
creator:
  • Lipinski, Christopher
  • Hopkins, Andrew
subjects:
  • Strategy
  • Biological
  • Drugs
  • Biology
  • Copyrights
  • Synthesis
  • Searching
  • Medicine
  • Documents
  • General and Nonclassified (MD)
  • General and Nonclassified (EC)
  • General and Nonclassified (Ed)
  • General and Nonclassified (Ep)
  • Surveying, Theory, and Analysis (CE)
  • Design Principles, Theory, and Analysis (Mt)
  • Computing Milieux (General) (Ci)
  • Electronics and Communications Milieux (General) (Ea)
  • Solid State Milieux (General) (So)
  • Article
ispartof: Nature, Dec 16, 2004, Vol.432(7019), p.855(7)
description: Despite over a century of applying organic synthesis to the search for drugs, we are still far from even a cursory examination of the vast number of possible small molecules that could be created. Indeed, a thorough examination of all 'chemical space' is practically impossible. Given this, what are the best strategies for identifying small molecules that modulate biological targets? And how might such strategies differ, depending on whether the primary goal is to understand biological systems or to develop potential drugs?
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0028-0836
  • 00280836
url: Link


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descriptionDespite over a century of applying organic synthesis to the search for drugs, we are still far from even a cursory examination of the vast number of possible small molecules that could be created. Indeed, a thorough examination of all 'chemical space' is practically impossible. Given this, what are the best strategies for identifying small molecules that modulate biological targets? And how might such strategies differ, depending on whether the primary goal is to understand biological systems or to develop potential drugs?
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subjectStrategy ; Biological ; Drugs ; Biology ; Copyrights ; Synthesis ; Searching ; Medicine ; Documents ; General and Nonclassified (MD) ; General and Nonclassified (EC) ; General and Nonclassified (Ed) ; General and Nonclassified (Ep) ; Surveying, Theory, and Analysis (CE) ; Design Principles, Theory, and Analysis (Mt) ; Computing Milieux (General) (Ci) ; Electronics and Communications Milieux (General) (Ea) ; Solid State Milieux (General) (So) ; Article;
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abstractDespite over a century of applying organic synthesis to the search for drugs, we are still far from even a cursory examination of the vast number of possible small molecules that could be created. Indeed, a thorough examination of all 'chemical space' is practically impossible. Given this, what are the best strategies for identifying small molecules that modulate biological targets? And how might such strategies differ, depending on whether the primary goal is to understand biological systems or to develop potential drugs?
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