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Factors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing.(ORIGINAL RESEARCH)(Report)

Purpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral antico... Full description

Journal Title: Patient Preference and Adherence Annual, 2013, Vol.7, p.1(13)
Main Author: Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar
Other Authors: Barnett, Julie , Kuljis, Jasna , Hone, Kate , Kaczmarski, Richard
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1177-889X ; DOI: 10.2147/PPA.S38328
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recordid: gale_hrca375816031
title: Factors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing.(ORIGINAL RESEARCH)(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar
  • Barnett, Julie
  • Kuljis, Jasna
  • Hone, Kate
  • Kaczmarski, Richard
subjects:
  • Patients -- Beliefs, Opinions And Attitudes
  • Patients -- Care And Treatment
  • Patient Monitoring Equipment -- Usage
  • Self Care (Health) -- Equipment And Supplies
  • Health Behavior -- Research
  • Medical Research
ispartof: Patient Preference and Adherence, Annual, 2013, Vol.7, p.1(13)
description: Purpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists, eg, warfarin. Methods: A cross-sectional study that applied the technology-acceptance model through a self-completed questionnaire, which was administered to a convenience sample of 125 outpatients attending outpatient anticoagulation services at a district general hospital in London, UK. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses, and structural equation modeling. Results: The participants were mainly male (64%) and aged [greater than or equal to] 71 years (60%). All these patients were attending the hospital outpatient anticoagulation clinic for INR testing; only two patients were currently using INR self-testing, 84% of patients had no knowledge about INR self-testing using a portable coagulometer device, and 96% of patients were never offered the option of the INR self-testing. A significant structural equation model explaining 79% of the variance in patients' intentions to use INR self-testing was observed. The significant predictors that directly affected patients' intention to use INR self-testing were the perception of technology (P = 0.92, P < 0.001), trust in doctor (P = -0.24, P = 0.028), and affordability (P = 0.15, P = 0.016). In addition, the perception of technology was significantly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.43, P = 0.002), age (P = -0.32, P < 0.001), and affordability (P = 0.23, P = 0.013); thereby, the intention to use INR self-testing was indirectly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.40), age (P = -0.29), and affordability (P = 0.21) via the perception of technology. Conclusion: Patients' intentions to use portable coagulometers for INR self-testing are affected by patients' perceptions about the INR testing device, the cost of device, trust in doctors/ clinicians, and the age of the patient, which need to be considered prior to any intervention involving INR self-testing by patients. Manufacturers should focus on increasing the affordability of INR testing devices for patients' self-testing and on the potential role of medical practitioners in supporting use of these medical devices as patients move from hospital to home testing. Keywords: oral anticoagulation, INR s
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1177-889X ; DOI: 10.2147/PPA.S38328
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1177-889X
  • 1177889X
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titleFactors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing.(ORIGINAL RESEARCH)(Report)
creatorShah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar ; Barnett, Julie ; Kuljis, Jasna ; Hone, Kate ; Kaczmarski, Richard
ispartofPatient Preference and Adherence, Annual, 2013, Vol.7, p.1(13)
identifierISSN: 1177-889X ; DOI: 10.2147/PPA.S38328
subjectPatients -- Beliefs, Opinions And Attitudes ; Patients -- Care And Treatment ; Patient Monitoring Equipment -- Usage ; Self Care (Health) -- Equipment And Supplies ; Health Behavior -- Research ; Medical Research
descriptionPurpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists, eg, warfarin. Methods: A cross-sectional study that applied the technology-acceptance model through a self-completed questionnaire, which was administered to a convenience sample of 125 outpatients attending outpatient anticoagulation services at a district general hospital in London, UK. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses, and structural equation modeling. Results: The participants were mainly male (64%) and aged [greater than or equal to] 71 years (60%). All these patients were attending the hospital outpatient anticoagulation clinic for INR testing; only two patients were currently using INR self-testing, 84% of patients had no knowledge about INR self-testing using a portable coagulometer device, and 96% of patients were never offered the option of the INR self-testing. A significant structural equation model explaining 79% of the variance in patients' intentions to use INR self-testing was observed. The significant predictors that directly affected patients' intention to use INR self-testing were the perception of technology (P = 0.92, P < 0.001), trust in doctor (P = -0.24, P = 0.028), and affordability (P = 0.15, P = 0.016). In addition, the perception of technology was significantly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.43, P = 0.002), age (P = -0.32, P < 0.001), and affordability (P = 0.23, P = 0.013); thereby, the intention to use INR self-testing was indirectly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.40), age (P = -0.29), and affordability (P = 0.21) via the perception of technology. Conclusion: Patients' intentions to use portable coagulometers for INR self-testing are affected by patients' perceptions about the INR testing device, the cost of device, trust in doctors/ clinicians, and the age of the patient, which need to be considered prior to any intervention involving INR self-testing by patients. Manufacturers should focus on increasing the affordability of INR testing devices for patients' self-testing and on the potential role of medical practitioners in supporting use of these medical devices as patients move from hospital to home testing. Keywords: oral anticoagulation, INR self-testing, technology-acceptance model, trust in doctor, home testing, affordability, structural equation modeling
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titleFactors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing.(ORIGINAL RESEARCH)(Report)
descriptionPurpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists, eg, warfarin. Methods: A cross-sectional study that applied the technology-acceptance model through a self-completed questionnaire, which was administered to a convenience sample of 125 outpatients attending outpatient anticoagulation services at a district general hospital in London, UK. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses, and structural equation modeling. Results: The participants were mainly male (64%) and aged [greater than or equal to] 71 years (60%). All these patients were attending the hospital outpatient anticoagulation clinic for INR testing; only two patients were currently using INR self-testing, 84% of patients had no knowledge about INR self-testing using a portable coagulometer device, and 96% of patients were never offered the option of the INR self-testing. A significant structural equation model explaining 79% of the variance in patients' intentions to use INR self-testing was observed. The significant predictors that directly affected patients' intention to use INR self-testing were the perception of technology (P = 0.92, P < 0.001), trust in doctor (P = -0.24, P = 0.028), and affordability (P = 0.15, P = 0.016). In addition, the perception of technology was significantly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.43, P = 0.002), age (P = -0.32, P < 0.001), and affordability (P = 0.23, P = 0.013); thereby, the intention to use INR self-testing was indirectly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.40), age (P = -0.29), and affordability (P = 0.21) via the perception of technology. Conclusion: Patients' intentions to use portable coagulometers for INR self-testing are affected by patients' perceptions about the INR testing device, the cost of device, trust in doctors/ clinicians, and the age of the patient, which need to be considered prior to any intervention involving INR self-testing by patients. Manufacturers should focus on increasing the affordability of INR testing devices for patients' self-testing and on the potential role of medical practitioners in supporting use of these medical devices as patients move from hospital to home testing. Keywords: oral anticoagulation, INR self-testing, technology-acceptance model, trust in doctor, home testing, affordability, structural equation modeling
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titleFactors determining patients' intentions to use point-of-care testing medical devices for self-monitoring: the case of international normalized ratio self-testing.(ORIGINAL RESEARCH)(Report)
authorShah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar ; Barnett, Julie ; Kuljis, Jasna ; Hone, Kate ; Kaczmarski, Richard
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abstractPurpose: To identify factors that determine patients' intentions to use point-of-care medical devices, ie, portable coagulometer devices for self-testing of the international normalized ratio (INR) required for ongoing monitoring of blood-coagulation intensity among patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists, eg, warfarin. Methods: A cross-sectional study that applied the technology-acceptance model through a self-completed questionnaire, which was administered to a convenience sample of 125 outpatients attending outpatient anticoagulation services at a district general hospital in London, UK. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, factor analyses, and structural equation modeling. Results: The participants were mainly male (64%) and aged [greater than or equal to] 71 years (60%). All these patients were attending the hospital outpatient anticoagulation clinic for INR testing; only two patients were currently using INR self-testing, 84% of patients had no knowledge about INR self-testing using a portable coagulometer device, and 96% of patients were never offered the option of the INR self-testing. A significant structural equation model explaining 79% of the variance in patients' intentions to use INR self-testing was observed. The significant predictors that directly affected patients' intention to use INR self-testing were the perception of technology (P = 0.92, P < 0.001), trust in doctor (P = -0.24, P = 0.028), and affordability (P = 0.15, P = 0.016). In addition, the perception of technology was significantly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.43, P = 0.002), age (P = -0.32, P < 0.001), and affordability (P = 0.23, P = 0.013); thereby, the intention to use INR self-testing was indirectly affected by trust in doctor (P = 0.40), age (P = -0.29), and affordability (P = 0.21) via the perception of technology. Conclusion: Patients' intentions to use portable coagulometers for INR self-testing are affected by patients' perceptions about the INR testing device, the cost of device, trust in doctors/ clinicians, and the age of the patient, which need to be considered prior to any intervention involving INR self-testing by patients. Manufacturers should focus on increasing the affordability of INR testing devices for patients' self-testing and on the potential role of medical practitioners in supporting use of these medical devices as patients move from hospital to home testing. Keywords: oral anticoagulation, INR self-testing, technology-acceptance model, trust in doctor, home testing, affordability, structural equation modeling
pubDove Medical Press Limited
doi10.2147/PPA.S38328
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date2013-01-01