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Fasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.(ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION)(Report)

Rationale [[DELTA].sup.9]-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this... Full description

Journal Title: Psychopharmacology Oct 15, 2014, Vol.231(20), p.3987(10)
Main Author: Wong, Alexander
Other Authors: Keats, Kirily , Rooney, Kieron , Hicks, Callum , Allsop, David J. , Arnold, Jonathon C. , Mcgregor, Iain S.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0033-3158 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00213-014-3532-3
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title: Fasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.(ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION)(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Wong, Alexander
  • Keats, Kirily
  • Rooney, Kieron
  • Hicks, Callum
  • Allsop, David J.
  • Arnold, Jonathon C.
  • Mcgregor, Iain S.
subjects:
  • Fasting -- Health Aspects
  • Exercise -- Health Aspects
  • Cannabinoids -- Dosage And Administration
  • Drug Interactions -- Identification And Classification
ispartof: Psychopharmacology, Oct 15, 2014, Vol.231(20), p.3987(10)
description: Rationale [[DELTA].sup.9]-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences. Objectives Here, we examined whether rats pre-treated with multiple or single doses of THC followed by a washout would show elevated plasma cannabinoids and altered behaviour following fasting or exercise manipulations designed to increase fat utilisation. Methods Behavioural impairment was measured as an inhibition of spontaneous locomotor activity or a failure to successfully complete a treadmill exercise session. Fat utilisation was indexed by plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels with plasma concentrations of THC and its terminal metabolite (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-[[DELTA].sup.9]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) also measured. Results Rats given daily THC (10 mg/kg) for 5 days followed by a 4-day washout showed elevated plasma THC-COOH when fasted for 24 h relative to non-fasted controls. Fasted rats showed lower locomotor activity than controls suggesting a behavioural effect of fat-released THC. However, rats fasted for 20 h after a single 5-mg/kg THC injection did not show locomotor suppression, despite modestly elevated plasma THC-COOH. Rats pre-treated with THC (5 mg/kg) and exercised 20 h later also showed elevated plasma THCCOOH but did not differ from controls in their likelihood of completing 30 min of treadmill exercise. Conclusions These results confirm that fasting and exercise can increase plasma cannabinoid levels. Behavioural consequences are more clearly observed with pre-treatment regimes involving repeated rather than single THC dosing. Keywords Adipocytes * Cannabis * Food deprivation * Lipolysis * THC * Exercise * Reintoxication * Fat * Cannabinoids
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0033-3158 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00213-014-3532-3
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0033-3158
  • 00333158
url: Link


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titleFasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.(ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION)(Report)
creatorWong, Alexander ; Keats, Kirily ; Rooney, Kieron ; Hicks, Callum ; Allsop, David J. ; Arnold, Jonathon C. ; Mcgregor, Iain S.
ispartofPsychopharmacology, Oct 15, 2014, Vol.231(20), p.3987(10)
identifierISSN: 0033-3158 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00213-014-3532-3
subjectFasting -- Health Aspects ; Exercise -- Health Aspects ; Cannabinoids -- Dosage And Administration ; Drug Interactions -- Identification And Classification
descriptionRationale [[DELTA].sup.9]-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences. Objectives Here, we examined whether rats pre-treated with multiple or single doses of THC followed by a washout would show elevated plasma cannabinoids and altered behaviour following fasting or exercise manipulations designed to increase fat utilisation. Methods Behavioural impairment was measured as an inhibition of spontaneous locomotor activity or a failure to successfully complete a treadmill exercise session. Fat utilisation was indexed by plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels with plasma concentrations of THC and its terminal metabolite (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-[[DELTA].sup.9]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) also measured. Results Rats given daily THC (10 mg/kg) for 5 days followed by a 4-day washout showed elevated plasma THC-COOH when fasted for 24 h relative to non-fasted controls. Fasted rats showed lower locomotor activity than controls suggesting a behavioural effect of fat-released THC. However, rats fasted for 20 h after a single 5-mg/kg THC injection did not show locomotor suppression, despite modestly elevated plasma THC-COOH. Rats pre-treated with THC (5 mg/kg) and exercised 20 h later also showed elevated plasma THCCOOH but did not differ from controls in their likelihood of completing 30 min of treadmill exercise. Conclusions These results confirm that fasting and exercise can increase plasma cannabinoid levels. Behavioural consequences are more clearly observed with pre-treatment regimes involving repeated rather than single THC dosing. Keywords Adipocytes * Cannabis * Food deprivation * Lipolysis * THC * Exercise * Reintoxication * Fat * Cannabinoids
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titleFasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.(ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION)(Report)
descriptionRationale [[DELTA].sup.9]-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences. Objectives Here, we examined whether rats pre-treated with multiple or single doses of THC followed by a washout would show elevated plasma cannabinoids and altered behaviour following fasting or exercise manipulations designed to increase fat utilisation. Methods Behavioural impairment was measured as an inhibition of spontaneous locomotor activity or a failure to successfully complete a treadmill exercise session. Fat utilisation was indexed by plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels with plasma concentrations of THC and its terminal metabolite (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-[[DELTA].sup.9]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) also measured. Results Rats given daily THC (10 mg/kg) for 5 days followed by a 4-day washout showed elevated plasma THC-COOH when fasted for 24 h relative to non-fasted controls. Fasted rats showed lower locomotor activity than controls suggesting a behavioural effect of fat-released THC. However, rats fasted for 20 h after a single 5-mg/kg THC injection did not show locomotor suppression, despite modestly elevated plasma THC-COOH. Rats pre-treated with THC (5 mg/kg) and exercised 20 h later also showed elevated plasma THCCOOH but did not differ from controls in their likelihood of completing 30 min of treadmill exercise. Conclusions These results confirm that fasting and exercise can increase plasma cannabinoid levels. Behavioural consequences are more clearly observed with pre-treatment regimes involving repeated rather than single THC dosing. Keywords Adipocytes * Cannabis * Food deprivation * Lipolysis * THC * Exercise * Reintoxication * Fat * Cannabinoids
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titleFasting and exercise increase plasma cannabinoid levels in THC pre-treated rats: an examination of behavioural consequences.(ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION)(Report)
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abstractRationale [[DELTA].sup.9]-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, accumulates in fat tissue where it can remain for prolonged periods. Under conditions of increased fat utilisation, blood cannabinoid concentrations can increase. However, it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences. Objectives Here, we examined whether rats pre-treated with multiple or single doses of THC followed by a washout would show elevated plasma cannabinoids and altered behaviour following fasting or exercise manipulations designed to increase fat utilisation. Methods Behavioural impairment was measured as an inhibition of spontaneous locomotor activity or a failure to successfully complete a treadmill exercise session. Fat utilisation was indexed by plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels with plasma concentrations of THC and its terminal metabolite (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-[[DELTA].sup.9]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) also measured. Results Rats given daily THC (10 mg/kg) for 5 days followed by a 4-day washout showed elevated plasma THC-COOH when fasted for 24 h relative to non-fasted controls. Fasted rats showed lower locomotor activity than controls suggesting a behavioural effect of fat-released THC. However, rats fasted for 20 h after a single 5-mg/kg THC injection did not show locomotor suppression, despite modestly elevated plasma THC-COOH. Rats pre-treated with THC (5 mg/kg) and exercised 20 h later also showed elevated plasma THCCOOH but did not differ from controls in their likelihood of completing 30 min of treadmill exercise. Conclusions These results confirm that fasting and exercise can increase plasma cannabinoid levels. Behavioural consequences are more clearly observed with pre-treatment regimes involving repeated rather than single THC dosing. Keywords Adipocytes * Cannabis * Food deprivation * Lipolysis * THC * Exercise * Reintoxication * Fat * Cannabinoids
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