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Housing mobility and cognitive development: Change in verbal and nonverbal abilities

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.06.002 Byline: Patrick J. Fowler, Lauren M. McGrath, David B. Henry, Michael Schoeny, Dina Chavira, Jeremy J. Taylor, Orin Day Abstract: This study investigates the influence of housing instability... Full description

Journal Title: Child Abuse and Neglect Oct, 2015, Vol.48, p.104(15)
Main Author: Fowler, Patrick J.
Other Authors: Mcgrath, Lauren M. , Henry, David B. , Schoeny, Michael , Chavira, Dina , Taylor, Jeremy J. , Day, Orin
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 0145-2134
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recordid: gale_hrca434754762
title: Housing mobility and cognitive development: Change in verbal and nonverbal abilities
format: Article
creator:
  • Fowler, Patrick J.
  • Mcgrath, Lauren M.
  • Henry, David B.
  • Schoeny, Michael
  • Chavira, Dina
  • Taylor, Jeremy J.
  • Day, Orin
subjects:
  • Family -- Analysis
  • Real Estate Appraisal -- Analysis
  • At Risk Youth -- Analysis
  • Child Development -- Analysis
  • Juvenile Offenders -- Analysis
  • Housing -- Analysis
ispartof: Child Abuse and Neglect, Oct, 2015, Vol.48, p.104(15)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.06.002 Byline: Patrick J. Fowler, Lauren M. McGrath, David B. Henry, Michael Schoeny, Dina Chavira, Jeremy J. Taylor, Orin Day Abstract: This study investigates the influence of housing instability on verbal and nonverbal cognitive development among at-risk children and adolescents involved in the child welfare system. Frequent residential changes threaten child mental health, especially among low-income families. Little is known regarding disruptions to cognitive growth, specifically the impact on verbal and nonverbal abilities. The study tests whether developmental timing of housing mobility affects cognitive development beyond individual and family risks. A nationally representative study of families (n =2,442) susceptible to housing and family instability tracked children and adolescents aged 4-14 years (M =8.95 years) over 36 months following investigation by the child welfare system. Youth completed standardized cognitive assessments while caregivers reported on behavior problems and family risk at three time points. Latent growth models examined change in cognitive abilities over time. Housing mobility in the 12 months prior to baseline predicts lower verbal cognitive abilities that improve marginally. Similar effects emerge for all age groups; however, frequent moves in infancy diminish the influence of subsequent housing mobility on verbal tasks. Housing instability threatened cognitive development beyond child maltreatment, family changes, poverty, and other risks. Findings inform emerging research on environmental influences on neurocognitive development, as well as identify targets for early intervention. Systematic assessment of family housing problems, including through the child welfare system, provides opportunities for coordinated responses to prevent instability and cognitive threats. Author Affiliation: (a) Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1196, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA (b) American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA (c) University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608, USA (d) University of Chicago, 969 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA (e) DePaul University, 2219 N Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, IL 60614, USA (f) Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 815 W. Van Buren St. Ste. 210, Chi
language: English
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 0145-2134
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0145-2134
  • 01452134
url: Link


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ispartofChild Abuse and Neglect, Oct, 2015, Vol.48, p.104(15)
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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.06.002 Byline: Patrick J. Fowler, Lauren M. McGrath, David B. Henry, Michael Schoeny, Dina Chavira, Jeremy J. Taylor, Orin Day Abstract: This study investigates the influence of housing instability on verbal and nonverbal cognitive development among at-risk children and adolescents involved in the child welfare system. Frequent residential changes threaten child mental health, especially among low-income families. Little is known regarding disruptions to cognitive growth, specifically the impact on verbal and nonverbal abilities. The study tests whether developmental timing of housing mobility affects cognitive development beyond individual and family risks. A nationally representative study of families (n =2,442) susceptible to housing and family instability tracked children and adolescents aged 4-14 years (M =8.95 years) over 36 months following investigation by the child welfare system. Youth completed standardized cognitive assessments while caregivers reported on behavior problems and family risk at three time points. Latent growth models examined change in cognitive abilities over time. Housing mobility in the 12 months prior to baseline predicts lower verbal cognitive abilities that improve marginally. Similar effects emerge for all age groups; however, frequent moves in infancy diminish the influence of subsequent housing mobility on verbal tasks. Housing instability threatened cognitive development beyond child maltreatment, family changes, poverty, and other risks. Findings inform emerging research on environmental influences on neurocognitive development, as well as identify targets for early intervention. Systematic assessment of family housing problems, including through the child welfare system, provides opportunities for coordinated responses to prevent instability and cognitive threats. Author Affiliation: (a) Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1196, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA (b) American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA (c) University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608, USA (d) University of Chicago, 969 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA (e) DePaul University, 2219 N Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, IL 60614, USA (f) Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 815 W. Van Buren St. Ste. 210, Chicago, IL 60607-3567, USA (g) Research Triangle International, 3040 East Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194, USA Article History: Received 23 January 2015; Revised 8 June 2015; Accepted 9 June 2015 Article Note: (footnote) [star] The project described was supported by Award Number R03HD066066 (PI: Fowler) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NICHD or the National Institutes of Health.
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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.06.002 Byline: Patrick J. Fowler, Lauren M. McGrath, David B. Henry, Michael Schoeny, Dina Chavira, Jeremy J. Taylor, Orin Day Abstract: This study investigates the influence of housing instability on verbal and nonverbal cognitive development among at-risk children and adolescents involved in the child welfare system. Frequent residential changes threaten child mental health, especially among low-income families. Little is known regarding disruptions to cognitive growth, specifically the impact on verbal and nonverbal abilities. The study tests whether developmental timing of housing mobility affects cognitive development beyond individual and family risks. A nationally representative study of families (n =2,442) susceptible to housing and family instability tracked children and adolescents aged 4-14 years (M =8.95 years) over 36 months following investigation by the child welfare system. Youth completed standardized cognitive assessments while caregivers reported on behavior problems and family risk at three time points. Latent growth models examined change in cognitive abilities over time. Housing mobility in the 12 months prior to baseline predicts lower verbal cognitive abilities that improve marginally. Similar effects emerge for all age groups; however, frequent moves in infancy diminish the influence of subsequent housing mobility on verbal tasks. Housing instability threatened cognitive development beyond child maltreatment, family changes, poverty, and other risks. Findings inform emerging research on environmental influences on neurocognitive development, as well as identify targets for early intervention. Systematic assessment of family housing problems, including through the child welfare system, provides opportunities for coordinated responses to prevent instability and cognitive threats. Author Affiliation: (a) Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1196, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA (b) American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA (c) University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608, USA (d) University of Chicago, 969 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA (e) DePaul University, 2219 N Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, IL 60614, USA (f) Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 815 W. Van Buren St. Ste. 210, Chicago, IL 60607-3567, USA (g) Research Triangle International, 3040 East Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194, USA Article History: Received 23 January 2015; Revised 8 June 2015; Accepted 9 June 2015 Article Note: (footnote) [star] The project described was supported by Award Number R03HD066066 (PI: Fowler) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NICHD or the National Institutes of Health.
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2015.06.002 Byline: Patrick J. Fowler, Lauren M. McGrath, David B. Henry, Michael Schoeny, Dina Chavira, Jeremy J. Taylor, Orin Day Abstract: This study investigates the influence of housing instability on verbal and nonverbal cognitive development among at-risk children and adolescents involved in the child welfare system. Frequent residential changes threaten child mental health, especially among low-income families. Little is known regarding disruptions to cognitive growth, specifically the impact on verbal and nonverbal abilities. The study tests whether developmental timing of housing mobility affects cognitive development beyond individual and family risks. A nationally representative study of families (n =2,442) susceptible to housing and family instability tracked children and adolescents aged 4-14 years (M =8.95 years) over 36 months following investigation by the child welfare system. Youth completed standardized cognitive assessments while caregivers reported on behavior problems and family risk at three time points. Latent growth models examined change in cognitive abilities over time. Housing mobility in the 12 months prior to baseline predicts lower verbal cognitive abilities that improve marginally. Similar effects emerge for all age groups; however, frequent moves in infancy diminish the influence of subsequent housing mobility on verbal tasks. Housing instability threatened cognitive development beyond child maltreatment, family changes, poverty, and other risks. Findings inform emerging research on environmental influences on neurocognitive development, as well as identify targets for early intervention. Systematic assessment of family housing problems, including through the child welfare system, provides opportunities for coordinated responses to prevent instability and cognitive threats. Author Affiliation: (a) Washington University in St. Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1196, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA (b) American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA (c) University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1747 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608, USA (d) University of Chicago, 969 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA (e) DePaul University, 2219 N Kenmore Avenue, Chicago, IL 60614, USA (f) Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 815 W. Van Buren St. Ste. 210, Chicago, IL 60607-3567, USA (g) Research Triangle International, 3040 East Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194, USA Article History: Received 23 January 2015; Revised 8 June 2015; Accepted 9 June 2015 Article Note: (footnote) [star] The project described was supported by Award Number R03HD066066 (PI: Fowler) from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NICHD or the National Institutes of Health.
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