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Internal migration, international migration, and physical growth of left-behind children: A study of two settings

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.09.008 Byline: Yao Lu Abstract: Parental out-migration has become a common experience of childhood worldwide and tends to have important ramifications for child development. There has been muc... Full description

Journal Title: Health and Place Nov, 2015, Vol.36, p.118(9)
Main Author: Lu, Yao
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 1353-8292
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recordid: gale_hrca437424589
title: Internal migration, international migration, and physical growth of left-behind children: A study of two settings
format: Article
creator:
  • Lu, Yao
subjects:
  • Emigration And Immigration -- Analysis
  • Child Development -- Analysis
  • Child Development -- Growth
  • Internal Migration -- Analysis
  • Parenting -- Analysis
  • Children -- Analysis
  • Children -- Growth
ispartof: Health and Place, Nov, 2015, Vol.36, p.118(9)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.09.008 Byline: Yao Lu Abstract: Parental out-migration has become a common experience of childhood worldwide and tends to have important ramifications for child development. There has been much debate on whether overall children benefit or suffer from parental out-migration. The present study examines how the relationship between parental out-migration and children's growth differs by the type of migration (internal vs. international). This comparison is conducted in two diverse settings, Mexico and Indonesia. Data are from two national longitudinal surveys: the Mexican Family Life Survey and the Indonesian Family Life Survey. Results from fixed-effect regressions show that international migration tends to have a less beneficial, sometimes even more detrimental, impact on the growth of children left behind than internal migration. Results also reveal contextual differences in the role of parental out-migration. Possible explanations are discussed. Author Affiliation: Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, 10027, United States Article History: Received 25 September 2014; Revised 23 September 2015; Accepted 24 September 2015
language: English
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 1353-8292
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1353-8292
  • 13538292
url: Link


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subjectEmigration And Immigration -- Analysis ; Child Development -- Analysis ; Child Development -- Growth ; Internal Migration -- Analysis ; Parenting -- Analysis ; Children -- Analysis ; Children -- Growth
descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.09.008 Byline: Yao Lu Abstract: Parental out-migration has become a common experience of childhood worldwide and tends to have important ramifications for child development. There has been much debate on whether overall children benefit or suffer from parental out-migration. The present study examines how the relationship between parental out-migration and children's growth differs by the type of migration (internal vs. international). This comparison is conducted in two diverse settings, Mexico and Indonesia. Data are from two national longitudinal surveys: the Mexican Family Life Survey and the Indonesian Family Life Survey. Results from fixed-effect regressions show that international migration tends to have a less beneficial, sometimes even more detrimental, impact on the growth of children left behind than internal migration. Results also reveal contextual differences in the role of parental out-migration. Possible explanations are discussed. Author Affiliation: Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, 10027, United States Article History: Received 25 September 2014; Revised 23 September 2015; Accepted 24 September 2015
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2015.09.008 Byline: Yao Lu Abstract: Parental out-migration has become a common experience of childhood worldwide and tends to have important ramifications for child development. There has been much debate on whether overall children benefit or suffer from parental out-migration. The present study examines how the relationship between parental out-migration and children's growth differs by the type of migration (internal vs. international). This comparison is conducted in two diverse settings, Mexico and Indonesia. Data are from two national longitudinal surveys: the Mexican Family Life Survey and the Indonesian Family Life Survey. Results from fixed-effect regressions show that international migration tends to have a less beneficial, sometimes even more detrimental, impact on the growth of children left behind than internal migration. Results also reveal contextual differences in the role of parental out-migration. Possible explanations are discussed. Author Affiliation: Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, 10027, United States Article History: Received 25 September 2014; Revised 23 September 2015; Accepted 24 September 2015
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