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Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts

Background: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and in... Full description

Journal Title: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Oct, 2000, Vol.72(4), p.990
Main Author: Michaud, Dominique S
Other Authors: Feskanich, Diane , Rimm, Eric B , Colditz, Graham A , Speizer, Frank E , Willett, Walter C , Giovannucci, Edward
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
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recordid: gale_hrca66304117
title: Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts
format: Article
creator:
  • Michaud, Dominique S
  • Feskanich, Diane
  • Rimm, Eric B
  • Colditz, Graham A
  • Speizer, Frank E
  • Willett, Walter C
  • Giovannucci, Edward
subjects:
  • Lung Cancer -- Prevention
  • Carotenoids -- Health Aspects
ispartof: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Oct, 2000, Vol.72(4), p.990
description: Background: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of [Alpha]-carotene, [Beta]-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts. Design: During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs). Results: In the pooled analyses, [Alpha]-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with [Beta]-carotene, lutein, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of [Alpha]-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). Conclusion: Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:990-7. KEY WORDS Carotenoids, fruit, vegetables, lung cancer, vitamins, cohort studies, epidemiology, men and women
language:
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identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9165
  • 00029165
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titleIntake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts
creatorMichaud, Dominique S ; Feskanich, Diane ; Rimm, Eric B ; Colditz, Graham A ; Speizer, Frank E ; Willett, Walter C ; Giovannucci, Edward
ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Oct, 2000, Vol.72(4), p.990
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectLung Cancer -- Prevention ; Carotenoids -- Health Aspects
descriptionBackground: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of [Alpha]-carotene, [Beta]-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts. Design: During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs). Results: In the pooled analyses, [Alpha]-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with [Beta]-carotene, lutein, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of [Alpha]-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). Conclusion: Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:990-7. KEY WORDS Carotenoids, fruit, vegetables, lung cancer, vitamins, cohort studies, epidemiology, men and women
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titleIntake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts.
descriptionBackground: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of [Alpha]-carotene, [Beta]-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts. Design: During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs). Results: In the pooled analyses, [Alpha]-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with [Beta]-carotene, lutein, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of [Alpha]-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). Conclusion: Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:990-7. KEY WORDS Carotenoids, fruit, vegetables, lung cancer, vitamins, cohort studies, epidemiology, men and women
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abstractBackground: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of [Alpha]-carotene, [Beta]-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts. Design: During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs). Results: In the pooled analyses, [Alpha]-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with [Beta]-carotene, lutein, and [Beta]-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of [Alpha]-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). Conclusion: Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:990-7. KEY WORDS Carotenoids, fruit, vegetables, lung cancer, vitamins, cohort studies, epidemiology, men and women
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