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Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.(Original Research Communications)(Author abstract)(Clinical report)

Background: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. Design: The participants... Full description

Journal Title: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Feb, 2007, Vol.85(2), p.523(7)
Main Author: Rohrmann, Sabine
Other Authors: Giovannucci, Edward , Willett, Walter C. , Platz, Elizabeth A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0002-9165
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recordid: gale_ofa159920115
title: Fruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.(Original Research Communications)(Author abstract)(Clinical report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Rohrmann, Sabine
  • Giovannucci, Edward
  • Willett, Walter C.
  • Platz, Elizabeth A.
subjects:
  • Prostatic Hyperplasia -- Risk Factors
  • Prostatic Hyperplasia -- Diet Therapy
  • Vegetables -- Nutritional Aspects
  • Vegetables -- Health Aspects
  • Fruits (Food) -- Nutritional Aspects
  • Fruits (Food) -- Health Aspects
ispartof: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Feb, 2007, Vol.85(2), p.523(7)
description: Background: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. Design: The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression. Results: Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile--OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in [beta]-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither [alpha]- nor [gamma]-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively). Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH. KEY WORDS Benign prostatic hyperplasia, micronutrients, fruit, vegetables
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9165
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9165
  • 00029165
url: Link


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titleFruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.(Original Research Communications)(Author abstract)(Clinical report)
creatorRohrmann, Sabine ; Giovannucci, Edward ; Willett, Walter C. ; Platz, Elizabeth A.
ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Feb, 2007, Vol.85(2), p.523(7)
identifierISSN: 0002-9165
subjectProstatic Hyperplasia -- Risk Factors ; Prostatic Hyperplasia -- Diet Therapy ; Vegetables -- Nutritional Aspects ; Vegetables -- Health Aspects ; Fruits (Food) -- Nutritional Aspects ; Fruits (Food) -- Health Aspects
descriptionBackground: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. Design: The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression. Results: Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile--OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in [beta]-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither [alpha]- nor [gamma]-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively). Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH. KEY WORDS Benign prostatic hyperplasia, micronutrients, fruit, vegetables
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titleFruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.(Original Research Communications)(Author abstract)(Clinical report)
descriptionBackground: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. Design: The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression. Results: Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile--OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in [beta]-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither [alpha]- nor [gamma]-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively). Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH. KEY WORDS Benign prostatic hyperplasia, micronutrients, fruit, vegetables
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titleFruit and vegetable consumption, intake of micronutrients, and benign prostatic hyperplasia in US men.(Original Research Communications)(Author abstract)(Clinical report)
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abstractBackground: Nutrients with antioxidant properties or that influence cell growth and differentiation might reduce the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Objective: The objective was to evaluate the association of fruit, vegetable, and micronutrient intakes with BPH. Design: The participants were members of the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and were aged 46-81 y in 1992. In 1992 and biennially thereafter, the men reported having surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in 1992 and on 3 subsequent questionnaires they completed the American Urological Association symptom index (AUASI). BPH cases were men who reported having surgery or who had an AUASI score of 15-35 (n = 6092). Control subjects were men who had not had surgery and never had an AUASI score >7 (n = 18 373). Men with a score of 8-14 were excluded (n = 7800). Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire in 1986. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) of BPH and 95% CIs using logistic regression. Results: Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with BPH (fifth compared with first quintile--OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.99; P for trend = 0.03), whereas fruit intake was not. Consumption of fruit and vegetables rich in [beta]-carotene (P for trend = 0.004), lutein (P for trend = 0.0004), or vitamin C (P for trend = 0.05) was inversely related to BPH. With increasing vitamin C intake from foods, men were less likely to have BPH (P for trend = 0.0009). Neither [alpha]- nor [gamma]-tocopherol intake from foods was associated with BPH (P for trend = 0.05 and 0.84, respectively). Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a diet rich in vegetables may reduce the occurrence of BPH. KEY WORDS Benign prostatic hyperplasia, micronutrients, fruit, vegetables
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