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Government Apologies for Historical Injustices.(Report)

To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9221.2008.00689.x Byline: Craig W. Blatz (1), Karina Schumann (1), Michael Ross (1) Keywords: Apology; Government Apology; Reparations; Historical Injustice; Reactive Devaluation Abstract: Scho... Full description

Journal Title: Political Psychology April, 2009, Vol.30, p.219(23)
Main Author: Blatz, Craig W.
Other Authors: Schumann, Karina , Ross, Michael
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 0162-895X
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title: Government Apologies for Historical Injustices.(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Blatz, Craig W.
  • Schumann, Karina
  • Ross, Michael
ispartof: Political Psychology, April, 2009, Vol.30, p.219(23)
description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9221.2008.00689.x Byline: Craig W. Blatz (1), Karina Schumann (1), Michael Ross (1) Keywords: Apology; Government Apology; Reparations; Historical Injustice; Reactive Devaluation Abstract: Scholars from various disciplines suggest that government apologies for historical injustices fulfill important psychological goals. After reviewing psychological literature that contributes to this discussion, we present a list of elements that political apologies should contain to be acceptable to both members of the victimized minority and the nonvictimized majority. Content coding of a list of government apologies revealed that many, but not all, include most of these elements. We then reviewed research demonstrating that political apologies that contain most of these facets are favorably evaluated, but especially by members of the nonvictimized majority. Next, we examined how the demands of victimized minorities affect their satisfaction with government apologies that lack some components. We conclude by discussing the implications of our analysis for when and how governments should apologize. Author Affiliation: (1)University of Waterloo
language: English
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 0162-895X
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0162-895X
  • 0162895X
url: Link


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descriptionTo authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9221.2008.00689.x Byline: Craig W. Blatz (1), Karina Schumann (1), Michael Ross (1) Keywords: Apology; Government Apology; Reparations; Historical Injustice; Reactive Devaluation Abstract: Scholars from various disciplines suggest that government apologies for historical injustices fulfill important psychological goals. After reviewing psychological literature that contributes to this discussion, we present a list of elements that political apologies should contain to be acceptable to both members of the victimized minority and the nonvictimized majority. Content coding of a list of government apologies revealed that many, but not all, include most of these elements. We then reviewed research demonstrating that political apologies that contain most of these facets are favorably evaluated, but especially by members of the nonvictimized majority. Next, we examined how the demands of victimized minorities affect their satisfaction with government apologies that lack some components. We conclude by discussing the implications of our analysis for when and how governments should apologize. Author Affiliation: (1)University of Waterloo
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abstractTo authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9221.2008.00689.x Byline: Craig W. Blatz (1), Karina Schumann (1), Michael Ross (1) Keywords: Apology; Government Apology; Reparations; Historical Injustice; Reactive Devaluation Abstract: Scholars from various disciplines suggest that government apologies for historical injustices fulfill important psychological goals. After reviewing psychological literature that contributes to this discussion, we present a list of elements that political apologies should contain to be acceptable to both members of the victimized minority and the nonvictimized majority. Content coding of a list of government apologies revealed that many, but not all, include most of these elements. We then reviewed research demonstrating that political apologies that contain most of these facets are favorably evaluated, but especially by members of the nonvictimized majority. Next, we examined how the demands of victimized minorities affect their satisfaction with government apologies that lack some components. We conclude by discussing the implications of our analysis for when and how governments should apologize. Author Affiliation: (1)University of Waterloo
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