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Impacts of salmon on riparian plant diversity.(REPORTS)(Author abstract)(Report)

The study of natural gradients in nutrient subsidies between ecosystems allows for predictions of how changes in one system can affect biodiversity in another. We performed a Large-scale empirical test of the role of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in structuring riparian plant communities. A com... Full description

Journal Title: Science March 25, 2011, Vol.331(6024), p.1609(4)
Main Author: Hocking, Morgan D.
Other Authors: Reynolds, John D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0036-8075
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recordid: gale_ofa253625712
title: Impacts of salmon on riparian plant diversity.(REPORTS)(Author abstract)(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Hocking, Morgan D.
  • Reynolds, John D.
subjects:
  • Pacific Salmon -- Natural History
  • Plant Communities -- Natural History
  • Aquatic Ecology -- Research
ispartof: Science, March 25, 2011, Vol.331(6024), p.1609(4)
description: The study of natural gradients in nutrient subsidies between ecosystems allows for predictions of how changes in one system can affect biodiversity in another. We performed a Large-scale empirical test of the role of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in structuring riparian plant communities. A comparison of 50 watersheds in the remote Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia's central coast in Canada shows that salmon influence nutrient loading to plants, shifting plant communities toward nutrient-rich species, which in turn decreases plant diversity. These effects are mediated by interactions between salmon density and the physical characteristics of watersheds. Predicting how salmon affect terrestrial ecosystems is central to conservation plans that aim to better integrate ecosystem values into resource management. 10.1126/science.1201079
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0036-8075
  • 00368075
url: Link


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titleImpacts of salmon on riparian plant diversity.(REPORTS)(Author abstract)(Report)
creatorHocking, Morgan D. ; Reynolds, John D.
ispartofScience, March 25, 2011, Vol.331(6024), p.1609(4)
identifierISSN: 0036-8075
subjectPacific Salmon -- Natural History ; Plant Communities -- Natural History ; Aquatic Ecology -- Research
descriptionThe study of natural gradients in nutrient subsidies between ecosystems allows for predictions of how changes in one system can affect biodiversity in another. We performed a Large-scale empirical test of the role of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in structuring riparian plant communities. A comparison of 50 watersheds in the remote Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia's central coast in Canada shows that salmon influence nutrient loading to plants, shifting plant communities toward nutrient-rich species, which in turn decreases plant diversity. These effects are mediated by interactions between salmon density and the physical characteristics of watersheds. Predicting how salmon affect terrestrial ecosystems is central to conservation plans that aim to better integrate ecosystem values into resource management. 10.1126/science.1201079
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titleImpacts of salmon on riparian plant diversity.(REPORTS)(Author abstract)(Report)
descriptionThe study of natural gradients in nutrient subsidies between ecosystems allows for predictions of how changes in one system can affect biodiversity in another. We performed a Large-scale empirical test of the role of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in structuring riparian plant communities. A comparison of 50 watersheds in the remote Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia's central coast in Canada shows that salmon influence nutrient loading to plants, shifting plant communities toward nutrient-rich species, which in turn decreases plant diversity. These effects are mediated by interactions between salmon density and the physical characteristics of watersheds. Predicting how salmon affect terrestrial ecosystems is central to conservation plans that aim to better integrate ecosystem values into resource management. 10.1126/science.1201079
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abstractThe study of natural gradients in nutrient subsidies between ecosystems allows for predictions of how changes in one system can affect biodiversity in another. We performed a Large-scale empirical test of the role of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in structuring riparian plant communities. A comparison of 50 watersheds in the remote Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia's central coast in Canada shows that salmon influence nutrient loading to plants, shifting plant communities toward nutrient-rich species, which in turn decreases plant diversity. These effects are mediated by interactions between salmon density and the physical characteristics of watersheds. Predicting how salmon affect terrestrial ecosystems is central to conservation plans that aim to better integrate ecosystem values into resource management. 10.1126/science.1201079
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