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Age differences in emotion recognition: the task matters.(Author abstract)(Report)

Objectives. This study examined the impact of context information on emotion recognition from a life-span developmental perspective. The main prediction was that age-related deficits in emotion recognition will only be evident in context-poor tasks. Methods. A sample of 48 younger ([M.sub.age] = 23... Full description

Journal Title: The Journals of Gerontology Series B, Jan, 2011, Vol.66(1), p.48(8)
Main Author: Richter, David
Other Authors: Dietzel, Cathrin , Kunzmann, Ute
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1079-5014
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recordid: gale_ofa260137690
title: Age differences in emotion recognition: the task matters.(Author abstract)(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Richter, David
  • Dietzel, Cathrin
  • Kunzmann, Ute
subjects:
  • Age Differences (Psychology) -- Research
  • Emotions -- Research
ispartof: The Journals of Gerontology, Series B, Jan, 2011, Vol.66(1), p.48(8)
description: Objectives. This study examined the impact of context information on emotion recognition from a life-span developmental perspective. The main prediction was that age-related deficits in emotion recognition will only be evident in context-poor tasks. Methods. A sample of 48 younger ([M.sub.age] = 23 years) and 35 older women ([M.sub.age] = 70 years) watched 48 film clips, each depicting a female target who talked about an emotional biographical episode and expressed one of three target emotions (i.e., happiness, sadness, or anger). Half of the films were presented without sound (context-poor condition) and the other half was presented with sound (context-rich condition). Results. Independent of the condition, younger women were better at recognizing sadness and anger than older women. However, the condition had an effect on age differences in happiness recognition: Age-related deficits were only evident in the context-poor condition. In addition, we found that logical reasoning predicted individual differences and age-related differences in sadness and anger recognition but not in happiness recognition. Discussion. The present findings suggest that age differences in emotion recognition are context and emotion specific. Together, the evidence speaks for substantial plasticity in emotion recognition (i.e., within-person variability) well into old age. Key Words: Age differences--Emotion recognition Life--span development. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq068
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1079-5014
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1079-5014
  • 10795014
url: Link


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titleAge differences in emotion recognition: the task matters.(Author abstract)(Report)
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descriptionObjectives. This study examined the impact of context information on emotion recognition from a life-span developmental perspective. The main prediction was that age-related deficits in emotion recognition will only be evident in context-poor tasks. Methods. A sample of 48 younger ([M.sub.age] = 23 years) and 35 older women ([M.sub.age] = 70 years) watched 48 film clips, each depicting a female target who talked about an emotional biographical episode and expressed one of three target emotions (i.e., happiness, sadness, or anger). Half of the films were presented without sound (context-poor condition) and the other half was presented with sound (context-rich condition). Results. Independent of the condition, younger women were better at recognizing sadness and anger than older women. However, the condition had an effect on age differences in happiness recognition: Age-related deficits were only evident in the context-poor condition. In addition, we found that logical reasoning predicted individual differences and age-related differences in sadness and anger recognition but not in happiness recognition. Discussion. The present findings suggest that age differences in emotion recognition are context and emotion specific. Together, the evidence speaks for substantial plasticity in emotion recognition (i.e., within-person variability) well into old age. Key Words: Age differences--Emotion recognition Life--span development. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq068
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titleAge differences in emotion recognition: the task matters.(Author abstract)(Report)
descriptionObjectives. This study examined the impact of context information on emotion recognition from a life-span developmental perspective. The main prediction was that age-related deficits in emotion recognition will only be evident in context-poor tasks. Methods. A sample of 48 younger ([M.sub.age] = 23 years) and 35 older women ([M.sub.age] = 70 years) watched 48 film clips, each depicting a female target who talked about an emotional biographical episode and expressed one of three target emotions (i.e., happiness, sadness, or anger). Half of the films were presented without sound (context-poor condition) and the other half was presented with sound (context-rich condition). Results. Independent of the condition, younger women were better at recognizing sadness and anger than older women. However, the condition had an effect on age differences in happiness recognition: Age-related deficits were only evident in the context-poor condition. In addition, we found that logical reasoning predicted individual differences and age-related differences in sadness and anger recognition but not in happiness recognition. Discussion. The present findings suggest that age differences in emotion recognition are context and emotion specific. Together, the evidence speaks for substantial plasticity in emotion recognition (i.e., within-person variability) well into old age. Key Words: Age differences--Emotion recognition Life--span development. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq068
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abstractObjectives. This study examined the impact of context information on emotion recognition from a life-span developmental perspective. The main prediction was that age-related deficits in emotion recognition will only be evident in context-poor tasks. Methods. A sample of 48 younger ([M.sub.age] = 23 years) and 35 older women ([M.sub.age] = 70 years) watched 48 film clips, each depicting a female target who talked about an emotional biographical episode and expressed one of three target emotions (i.e., happiness, sadness, or anger). Half of the films were presented without sound (context-poor condition) and the other half was presented with sound (context-rich condition). Results. Independent of the condition, younger women were better at recognizing sadness and anger than older women. However, the condition had an effect on age differences in happiness recognition: Age-related deficits were only evident in the context-poor condition. In addition, we found that logical reasoning predicted individual differences and age-related differences in sadness and anger recognition but not in happiness recognition. Discussion. The present findings suggest that age differences in emotion recognition are context and emotion specific. Together, the evidence speaks for substantial plasticity in emotion recognition (i.e., within-person variability) well into old age. Key Words: Age differences--Emotion recognition Life--span development. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbq068
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