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Fairness and the development of inequality acceptance.(Author abstract)

Fairness considerations fundamentally affect human behavior, but our understanding of the nature and development of people's fairness preferences is limited. The dictator game has been the standard experimental design for studying fairness preferences, but it only captures a situation where there is... Full description

Journal Title: Science May 28, 2010, Vol.328(5982), p.1176(3)
Main Author: Almas, Ingvild
Other Authors: Cappelen, Alexander W. , Sorensen, Erik O. , Tungodden, Bertil
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0036-8075
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recordid: gale_ofa276517643
title: Fairness and the development of inequality acceptance.(Author abstract)
format: Article
creator:
  • Almas, Ingvild
  • Cappelen, Alexander W.
  • Sorensen, Erik O.
  • Tungodden, Bertil
subjects:
  • Equality -- Analysis
  • Fairness -- Analysis
ispartof: Science, May 28, 2010, Vol.328(5982), p.1176(3)
description: Fairness considerations fundamentally affect human behavior, but our understanding of the nature and development of people's fairness preferences is limited. The dictator game has been the standard experimental design for studying fairness preferences, but it only captures a situation where there is broad agreement that fairness requires equality. In real life, people often disagree on what is fair because they disagree on whether individual achievements, luck, and efficiency considerations of what maximizes total benefits can justify inequalities. We modified the dictator game to capture these features and studied how inequality acceptance develops in adolescence. We found that as children enter adolescence, they increasingly view inequalities reflecting differences in individual achievements, but not luck, as fair, whereas efficiency considerations mainly play a role in late adolescence. doi: 10.1126/science.1187300
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0036-8075
  • 00368075
url: Link


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titleFairness and the development of inequality acceptance.(Author abstract)
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subjectEquality -- Analysis ; Fairness -- Analysis
descriptionFairness considerations fundamentally affect human behavior, but our understanding of the nature and development of people's fairness preferences is limited. The dictator game has been the standard experimental design for studying fairness preferences, but it only captures a situation where there is broad agreement that fairness requires equality. In real life, people often disagree on what is fair because they disagree on whether individual achievements, luck, and efficiency considerations of what maximizes total benefits can justify inequalities. We modified the dictator game to capture these features and studied how inequality acceptance develops in adolescence. We found that as children enter adolescence, they increasingly view inequalities reflecting differences in individual achievements, but not luck, as fair, whereas efficiency considerations mainly play a role in late adolescence. doi: 10.1126/science.1187300
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titleFairness and the development of inequality acceptance.(Author abstract)
descriptionFairness considerations fundamentally affect human behavior, but our understanding of the nature and development of people's fairness preferences is limited. The dictator game has been the standard experimental design for studying fairness preferences, but it only captures a situation where there is broad agreement that fairness requires equality. In real life, people often disagree on what is fair because they disagree on whether individual achievements, luck, and efficiency considerations of what maximizes total benefits can justify inequalities. We modified the dictator game to capture these features and studied how inequality acceptance develops in adolescence. We found that as children enter adolescence, they increasingly view inequalities reflecting differences in individual achievements, but not luck, as fair, whereas efficiency considerations mainly play a role in late adolescence. doi: 10.1126/science.1187300
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abstractFairness considerations fundamentally affect human behavior, but our understanding of the nature and development of people's fairness preferences is limited. The dictator game has been the standard experimental design for studying fairness preferences, but it only captures a situation where there is broad agreement that fairness requires equality. In real life, people often disagree on what is fair because they disagree on whether individual achievements, luck, and efficiency considerations of what maximizes total benefits can justify inequalities. We modified the dictator game to capture these features and studied how inequality acceptance develops in adolescence. We found that as children enter adolescence, they increasingly view inequalities reflecting differences in individual achievements, but not luck, as fair, whereas efficiency considerations mainly play a role in late adolescence. doi: 10.1126/science.1187300
pubAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science
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date2010-05-28