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Sexual dimorphism in cerebral ischemia injury

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.04.024 Byline: Wei Zuo, Wei Zhang, Ni-Hong Chen Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability and death. A complex series of biochemical and molecular mechanisms (e.g. the release of... Full description

Journal Title: European Journal of Pharmacology July 5, 2013, Vol.711(1-3), p.73(7)
Main Author: Zuo, Wei
Other Authors: Zhang, Wei , Chen, Ni - Hong
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0014-2999
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recordid: gale_ofa341655725
title: Sexual dimorphism in cerebral ischemia injury
format: Article
creator:
  • Zuo, Wei
  • Zhang, Wei
  • Chen, Ni - Hong
subjects:
  • Brain Injuries
  • Estrogens
  • Proteins
  • Cerebral Ischemia
ispartof: European Journal of Pharmacology, July 5, 2013, Vol.711(1-3), p.73(7)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.04.024 Byline: Wei Zuo, Wei Zhang, Ni-Hong Chen Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability and death. A complex series of biochemical and molecular mechanisms (e.g. the release of ROS/NOS, proapoptotic proteins and proinflammatory cytokine; neuronal depolarization, Ca2+ accumulation and so on) impair the neurologic functions of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. The principal mammalian estrogen (17[beta] estradiol or E2) is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However the incidence of stroke in women is lower than in men until decades past menopause, suggesting that factors beyond sex hormone contribute to these epidemiological sex differences. So a new concept is emerging: both sex steroids and biologic sex are important factors in clinical and experimental strokes. In this review, we will address sex steroids and gender differences in influencing the mechanisms and outcomes of brain ischemia stroke. These sex differences need to be identified which could help future translation to human neuroprotection. Author Affiliation: (a) Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, China (b) Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Article History: Received 17 February 2013; Revised 24 April 2013; Accepted 26 April 2013
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0014-2999
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0014-2999
  • 00142999
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subjectBrain Injuries ; Estrogens ; Proteins ; Cerebral Ischemia
descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.04.024 Byline: Wei Zuo, Wei Zhang, Ni-Hong Chen Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability and death. A complex series of biochemical and molecular mechanisms (e.g. the release of ROS/NOS, proapoptotic proteins and proinflammatory cytokine; neuronal depolarization, Ca2+ accumulation and so on) impair the neurologic functions of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. The principal mammalian estrogen (17[beta] estradiol or E2) is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However the incidence of stroke in women is lower than in men until decades past menopause, suggesting that factors beyond sex hormone contribute to these epidemiological sex differences. So a new concept is emerging: both sex steroids and biologic sex are important factors in clinical and experimental strokes. In this review, we will address sex steroids and gender differences in influencing the mechanisms and outcomes of brain ischemia stroke. These sex differences need to be identified which could help future translation to human neuroprotection. Author Affiliation: (a) Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, China (b) Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Article History: Received 17 February 2013; Revised 24 April 2013; Accepted 26 April 2013
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.04.024 Byline: Wei Zuo, Wei Zhang, Ni-Hong Chen Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of permanent disability and death. A complex series of biochemical and molecular mechanisms (e.g. the release of ROS/NOS, proapoptotic proteins and proinflammatory cytokine; neuronal depolarization, Ca2+ accumulation and so on) impair the neurologic functions of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. The principal mammalian estrogen (17[beta] estradiol or E2) is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However the incidence of stroke in women is lower than in men until decades past menopause, suggesting that factors beyond sex hormone contribute to these epidemiological sex differences. So a new concept is emerging: both sex steroids and biologic sex are important factors in clinical and experimental strokes. In this review, we will address sex steroids and gender differences in influencing the mechanisms and outcomes of brain ischemia stroke. These sex differences need to be identified which could help future translation to human neuroprotection. Author Affiliation: (a) Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization, Ministry of Education, Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, China (b) Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China Article History: Received 17 February 2013; Revised 24 April 2013; Accepted 26 April 2013
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