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When do we lie?

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.037 Byline: Alexander W. Cappelen, Erik O. Sorensen, Bertil Tungodden Abstract: acents Aversion to lying appears to be of major importance in a personal context. acents Aversion to lying appears t... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization Sept, 2013, Vol.93, p.258(8)
Main Author: Cappelen, Alexander W.
Other Authors: Sorensen, Erik O. , Tungodden, Bertil
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 0167-2681
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title: When do we lie?
format: Article
creator:
  • Cappelen, Alexander W.
  • Sorensen, Erik O.
  • Tungodden, Bertil
ispartof: Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Sept, 2013, Vol.93, p.258(8)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.037 Byline: Alexander W. Cappelen, Erik O. Sorensen, Bertil Tungodden Abstract: acents Aversion to lying appears to be of major importance in a personal context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be of minor importance in a market context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be strengthened by intuitive reasoning. acents Aversion to lying is stronger among altruistic individuals. Author Affiliation: Department of Economics, NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Helleveien 30, 5045 Bergen, Norway Article History: Received 18 March 2013; Accepted 21 March 2013 Article Note: (footnote) [star] We dedicate this paper to the first research coordinator of The Choice Lab, late Cecilie Rasmussen, who passed away far too young on a research trip to Berkeley in the spring of 2012. We thank our present research coordinator Ranveig Falck as well as Ida Elise S. Bergsmark, Eli Birgitte S. Bergsmark, Kristina Bott, Anne-Mari Bratholt, Pal Kristian Granholt, Kartika Sari Juniwaty, John McGregor, Andreas Olden, Kristin Orset, Charlotte Ringdal, Ana Beatriz Aguilar Borges Santos, Oivind Schoyen and Kristina Oystese for great research assistance on the project. We also thank participants at the Rady Conference on "Deception, Incentives and Behavior" in San Diego for constructive comments. The project was financed by support from the Research Council of Norway, research grant 202484, and administered by The Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics.
language: English
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 0167-2681
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 0167-2681
  • 01672681
url: Link


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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.037 Byline: Alexander W. Cappelen, Erik O. Sorensen, Bertil Tungodden Abstract: acents Aversion to lying appears to be of major importance in a personal context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be of minor importance in a market context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be strengthened by intuitive reasoning. acents Aversion to lying is stronger among altruistic individuals. Author Affiliation: Department of Economics, NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Helleveien 30, 5045 Bergen, Norway Article History: Received 18 March 2013; Accepted 21 March 2013 Article Note: (footnote) [star] We dedicate this paper to the first research coordinator of The Choice Lab, late Cecilie Rasmussen, who passed away far too young on a research trip to Berkeley in the spring of 2012. We thank our present research coordinator Ranveig Falck as well as Ida Elise S. Bergsmark, Eli Birgitte S. Bergsmark, Kristina Bott, Anne-Mari Bratholt, Pal Kristian Granholt, Kartika Sari Juniwaty, John McGregor, Andreas Olden, Kristin Orset, Charlotte Ringdal, Ana Beatriz Aguilar Borges Santos, Oivind Schoyen and Kristina Oystese for great research assistance on the project. We also thank participants at the Rady Conference on "Deception, Incentives and Behavior" in San Diego for constructive comments. The project was financed by support from the Research Council of Norway, research grant 202484, and administered by The Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics.
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.037 Byline: Alexander W. Cappelen, Erik O. Sorensen, Bertil Tungodden Abstract: acents Aversion to lying appears to be of major importance in a personal context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be of minor importance in a market context. acents Aversion to lying appears to be strengthened by intuitive reasoning. acents Aversion to lying is stronger among altruistic individuals. Author Affiliation: Department of Economics, NHH Norwegian School of Economics, Helleveien 30, 5045 Bergen, Norway Article History: Received 18 March 2013; Accepted 21 March 2013 Article Note: (footnote) [star] We dedicate this paper to the first research coordinator of The Choice Lab, late Cecilie Rasmussen, who passed away far too young on a research trip to Berkeley in the spring of 2012. We thank our present research coordinator Ranveig Falck as well as Ida Elise S. Bergsmark, Eli Birgitte S. Bergsmark, Kristina Bott, Anne-Mari Bratholt, Pal Kristian Granholt, Kartika Sari Juniwaty, John McGregor, Andreas Olden, Kristin Orset, Charlotte Ringdal, Ana Beatriz Aguilar Borges Santos, Oivind Schoyen and Kristina Oystese for great research assistance on the project. We also thank participants at the Rady Conference on "Deception, Incentives and Behavior" in San Diego for constructive comments. The project was financed by support from the Research Council of Norway, research grant 202484, and administered by The Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics.
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