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Associations of Dietary Fiber Intake With Long-Term Predicted Cardiovascular Disease Risk and C-Reactive Protein Levels (from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data [2005-2010])

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.020 Byline: Hongyan Ning, Linda Van Horn, Christina M. Shay, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones Abstract: Dietary fiber intake might reduce cardiovascular risk factor levels and, in turn, might lower the lo... Full description

Journal Title: American Journal of Cardiology Jan 15, 2014, Vol.113(2), p.287(5)
Main Author: Ning, Hongyan
Other Authors: Van Horn, Linda , Shay, Christina M. , Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 0002-9149
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recordid: gale_ofa354776321
title: Associations of Dietary Fiber Intake With Long-Term Predicted Cardiovascular Disease Risk and C-Reactive Protein Levels (from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data [2005-2010])
format: Article
creator:
  • Ning, Hongyan
  • Van Horn, Linda
  • Shay, Christina M.
  • Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.
subjects:
  • Adults – Surveys
  • Cardiovascular Diseases – Risk Factors
ispartof: American Journal of Cardiology, Jan 15, 2014, Vol.113(2), p.287(5)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.020 Byline: Hongyan Ning, Linda Van Horn, Christina M. Shay, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones Abstract: Dietary fiber intake might reduce cardiovascular risk factor levels and, in turn, might lower the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 11,113 subjects, aged 20 to 79 years with no history of CVD, from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in the present study to examine associations of dietary fiber intake with predicted lifetime CVD risk and C-reactive protein levels. Dietary fiber intake showed a significant gradient association with the likelihood of having a low or an intermediate predicted lifetime CVD risk among young and middle-age adults. In fully adjusted multinomial logistic models, dietary fiber intake was related to a low lifetime CVD risk with an odds ratio of 2.71 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 3.59) in the young adults and 2.13 (95% confidence interval 1.42 to 3.20) in the middle-age adults and was related to an intermediate lifetime risk of 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 3.92) in the young and 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 2.98) in the middle-age adults compared with a high lifetime risk. A significant inverse linear association was seen between dietary fiber intake and log-transformed C-reactive protein levels with a regression coefficient [+ or -] standard error of -0.18 [+ or -] 0.04 in the highest quartile of fiber intake compared with the lowest fiber intake. In conclusion, these data suggest that dietary fiber intake is independently associated with the predicted lifetime CVD risk, especially in young and middle-age adults. A greater amount of dietary fiber intake might be associated with lower C-reactive protein levels. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (b) Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Article History: Received 11 July 2013; Revised 21 September 2013; Accepted 21 September 2013 Article Note: (footnote) See page 291 for disclosure information.
language: eng
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 0002-9149
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0002-9149
  • 00029149
url: Link


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titleAssociations of Dietary Fiber Intake With Long-Term Predicted Cardiovascular Disease Risk and C-Reactive Protein Levels (from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data [2005-2010])
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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.020 Byline: Hongyan Ning, Linda Van Horn, Christina M. Shay, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones Abstract: Dietary fiber intake might reduce cardiovascular risk factor levels and, in turn, might lower the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 11,113 subjects, aged 20 to 79 years with no history of CVD, from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in the present study to examine associations of dietary fiber intake with predicted lifetime CVD risk and C-reactive protein levels. Dietary fiber intake showed a significant gradient association with the likelihood of having a low or an intermediate predicted lifetime CVD risk among young and middle-age adults. In fully adjusted multinomial logistic models, dietary fiber intake was related to a low lifetime CVD risk with an odds ratio of 2.71 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 3.59) in the young adults and 2.13 (95% confidence interval 1.42 to 3.20) in the middle-age adults and was related to an intermediate lifetime risk of 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 3.92) in the young and 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 2.98) in the middle-age adults compared with a high lifetime risk. A significant inverse linear association was seen between dietary fiber intake and log-transformed C-reactive protein levels with a regression coefficient [+ or -] standard error of -0.18 [+ or -] 0.04 in the highest quartile of fiber intake compared with the lowest fiber intake. In conclusion, these data suggest that dietary fiber intake is independently associated with the predicted lifetime CVD risk, especially in young and middle-age adults. A greater amount of dietary fiber intake might be associated with lower C-reactive protein levels. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (b) Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Article History: Received 11 July 2013; Revised 21 September 2013; Accepted 21 September 2013 Article Note: (footnote) See page 291 for disclosure information.
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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.020 Byline: Hongyan Ning, Linda Van Horn, Christina M. Shay, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones Abstract: Dietary fiber intake might reduce cardiovascular risk factor levels and, in turn, might lower the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 11,113 subjects, aged 20 to 79 years with no history of CVD, from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in the present study to examine associations of dietary fiber intake with predicted lifetime CVD risk and C-reactive protein levels. Dietary fiber intake showed a significant gradient association with the likelihood of having a low or an intermediate predicted lifetime CVD risk among young and middle-age adults. In fully adjusted multinomial logistic models, dietary fiber intake was related to a low lifetime CVD risk with an odds ratio of 2.71 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 3.59) in the young adults and 2.13 (95% confidence interval 1.42 to 3.20) in the middle-age adults and was related to an intermediate lifetime risk of 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 3.92) in the young and 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 2.98) in the middle-age adults compared with a high lifetime risk. A significant inverse linear association was seen between dietary fiber intake and log-transformed C-reactive protein levels with a regression coefficient [+ or -] standard error of -0.18 [+ or -] 0.04 in the highest quartile of fiber intake compared with the lowest fiber intake. In conclusion, these data suggest that dietary fiber intake is independently associated with the predicted lifetime CVD risk, especially in young and middle-age adults. A greater amount of dietary fiber intake might be associated with lower C-reactive protein levels. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (b) Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Article History: Received 11 July 2013; Revised 21 September 2013; Accepted 21 September 2013 Article Note: (footnote) See page 291 for disclosure information.
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.020 Byline: Hongyan Ning, Linda Van Horn, Christina M. Shay, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones Abstract: Dietary fiber intake might reduce cardiovascular risk factor levels and, in turn, might lower the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A total of 11,113 subjects, aged 20 to 79 years with no history of CVD, from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in the present study to examine associations of dietary fiber intake with predicted lifetime CVD risk and C-reactive protein levels. Dietary fiber intake showed a significant gradient association with the likelihood of having a low or an intermediate predicted lifetime CVD risk among young and middle-age adults. In fully adjusted multinomial logistic models, dietary fiber intake was related to a low lifetime CVD risk with an odds ratio of 2.71 (95% confidence interval 2.05 to 3.59) in the young adults and 2.13 (95% confidence interval 1.42 to 3.20) in the middle-age adults and was related to an intermediate lifetime risk of 2.65 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 3.92) in the young and 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 2.98) in the middle-age adults compared with a high lifetime risk. A significant inverse linear association was seen between dietary fiber intake and log-transformed C-reactive protein levels with a regression coefficient [+ or -] standard error of -0.18 [+ or -] 0.04 in the highest quartile of fiber intake compared with the lowest fiber intake. In conclusion, these data suggest that dietary fiber intake is independently associated with the predicted lifetime CVD risk, especially in young and middle-age adults. A greater amount of dietary fiber intake might be associated with lower C-reactive protein levels. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (b) Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Article History: Received 11 July 2013; Revised 21 September 2013; Accepted 21 September 2013 Article Note: (footnote) See page 291 for disclosure information.
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