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Self-replicating colloidal clusters.(PHYSICS)(Author abstract)

We construct schemes for self-replicating clusters of spherical particles, validated with computer simulations in a finite-temperature heat bath. Each particle has stickers uniformly distributed over its surface, and the rules for self-replication are encoded into the specificity and strength of int... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States Feb 4, 2014, Vol.111(5), p.1748(6)
Main Author: Zeravcic, Zorana
Other Authors: Brenner, Michael P.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0027-8424
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title: Self-replicating colloidal clusters.(PHYSICS)(Author abstract)
format: Article
creator:
  • Zeravcic, Zorana
  • Brenner, Michael P.
subjects:
  • Computer Simulation -- Research
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, Feb 4, 2014, Vol.111(5), p.1748(6)
description: We construct schemes for self-replicating clusters of spherical particles, validated with computer simulations in a finite-temperature heat bath. Each particle has stickers uniformly distributed over its surface, and the rules for self-replication are encoded into the specificity and strength of interactions. Geometrical constraints imply that a compact cluster can copy itself only with help of a catalyst, a smaller cluster that increases the surface area to form a template. Replication efficiency requires optimizing interaction energies to destabilize all kinetic traps along the reaction pathway, as well as initiating a trigger event that specifies when the new cluster disassociates from its parent. Although there is a reasonably wide parameter range for self-replication, there is a subtle balance between the speed of the reaction, and the error rate. As a proof of principle, we construct interactions that self-replicate an octahedron, requiring a two-particle dimer for a catalyst. The resulting self-replication scheme is a hypercycle, and computer simulations confirm the exponential growth of both octahedron and catalyst replicas. self-assembly | catalytic cycle www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1313601111
language: English
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0027-8424
  • 00278424
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titleSelf-replicating colloidal clusters.(PHYSICS)(Author abstract)
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descriptionWe construct schemes for self-replicating clusters of spherical particles, validated with computer simulations in a finite-temperature heat bath. Each particle has stickers uniformly distributed over its surface, and the rules for self-replication are encoded into the specificity and strength of interactions. Geometrical constraints imply that a compact cluster can copy itself only with help of a catalyst, a smaller cluster that increases the surface area to form a template. Replication efficiency requires optimizing interaction energies to destabilize all kinetic traps along the reaction pathway, as well as initiating a trigger event that specifies when the new cluster disassociates from its parent. Although there is a reasonably wide parameter range for self-replication, there is a subtle balance between the speed of the reaction, and the error rate. As a proof of principle, we construct interactions that self-replicate an octahedron, requiring a two-particle dimer for a catalyst. The resulting self-replication scheme is a hypercycle, and computer simulations confirm the exponential growth of both octahedron and catalyst replicas. self-assembly | catalytic cycle www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1313601111
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titleSelf-replicating colloidal clusters.(PHYSICS)(Author abstract)
descriptionWe construct schemes for self-replicating clusters of spherical particles, validated with computer simulations in a finite-temperature heat bath. Each particle has stickers uniformly distributed over its surface, and the rules for self-replication are encoded into the specificity and strength of interactions. Geometrical constraints imply that a compact cluster can copy itself only with help of a catalyst, a smaller cluster that increases the surface area to form a template. Replication efficiency requires optimizing interaction energies to destabilize all kinetic traps along the reaction pathway, as well as initiating a trigger event that specifies when the new cluster disassociates from its parent. Although there is a reasonably wide parameter range for self-replication, there is a subtle balance between the speed of the reaction, and the error rate. As a proof of principle, we construct interactions that self-replicate an octahedron, requiring a two-particle dimer for a catalyst. The resulting self-replication scheme is a hypercycle, and computer simulations confirm the exponential growth of both octahedron and catalyst replicas. self-assembly | catalytic cycle www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1313601111
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abstractWe construct schemes for self-replicating clusters of spherical particles, validated with computer simulations in a finite-temperature heat bath. Each particle has stickers uniformly distributed over its surface, and the rules for self-replication are encoded into the specificity and strength of interactions. Geometrical constraints imply that a compact cluster can copy itself only with help of a catalyst, a smaller cluster that increases the surface area to form a template. Replication efficiency requires optimizing interaction energies to destabilize all kinetic traps along the reaction pathway, as well as initiating a trigger event that specifies when the new cluster disassociates from its parent. Although there is a reasonably wide parameter range for self-replication, there is a subtle balance between the speed of the reaction, and the error rate. As a proof of principle, we construct interactions that self-replicate an octahedron, requiring a two-particle dimer for a catalyst. The resulting self-replication scheme is a hypercycle, and computer simulations confirm the exponential growth of both octahedron and catalyst replicas. self-assembly | catalytic cycle www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1313601111
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