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Healthy migrant and salmon bias hypotheses: A study of health and internal migration in China.(Report)(Author abstract)

To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.040 Byline: Yao Lu, Lijian Qin Abstract: The existing literature has often underscored the "healthy migrant" effect and the "salmon bias" in understanding the health of migrants. Nevertheless... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine Feb, 2014, Vol.102, p.41(8)
Main Author: Lu, Yao
Other Authors: Qin, Lijian
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Cengage Learning, Inc.
ID: ISSN: 0277-9536
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recordid: gale_ofa361201224
title: Healthy migrant and salmon bias hypotheses: A study of health and internal migration in China.(Report)(Author abstract)
format: Article
creator:
  • Lu, Yao
  • Qin, Lijian
subjects:
  • Internal Migration
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, Feb, 2014, Vol.102, p.41(8)
description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.040 Byline: Yao Lu, Lijian Qin Abstract: The existing literature has often underscored the "healthy migrant" effect and the "salmon bias" in understanding the health of migrants. Nevertheless, direct evidence for these two hypotheses, particularly the "salmon bias," is limited. Using data from a national longitudinal survey conducted between 2003 and 2007 in China, we provide tests of these hypotheses in the case of internal migration in China. To examine the healthy migrant effect, we study how pre-migration self-reported health is associated with an individual's decision to migrate and the distance of migration. To test the salmon bias hypothesis, we compare the self-reported health of migrants who stay in destinations and who return or move closer to home villages. The results provide support for both hypotheses. Specifically, healthier individuals are more likely to migrate and to move further away from home. Among migrants, those with poorer health are more likely to return or to move closer to their origin communities. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA (b) Finance and Public Administrative School, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, #962 Caoshan Road, Bengbu City, Anhui Province, 233000, China
language: English
source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
identifier: ISSN: 0277-9536
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0277-9536
  • 02779536
url: Link


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titleHealthy migrant and salmon bias hypotheses: A study of health and internal migration in China.(Report)(Author abstract)
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descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.040 Byline: Yao Lu, Lijian Qin Abstract: The existing literature has often underscored the "healthy migrant" effect and the "salmon bias" in understanding the health of migrants. Nevertheless, direct evidence for these two hypotheses, particularly the "salmon bias," is limited. Using data from a national longitudinal survey conducted between 2003 and 2007 in China, we provide tests of these hypotheses in the case of internal migration in China. To examine the healthy migrant effect, we study how pre-migration self-reported health is associated with an individual's decision to migrate and the distance of migration. To test the salmon bias hypothesis, we compare the self-reported health of migrants who stay in destinations and who return or move closer to home villages. The results provide support for both hypotheses. Specifically, healthier individuals are more likely to migrate and to move further away from home. Among migrants, those with poorer health are more likely to return or to move closer to their origin communities. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA (b) Finance and Public Administrative School, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, #962 Caoshan Road, Bengbu City, Anhui Province, 233000, China
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titleHealthy migrant and salmon bias hypotheses: A study of health and internal migration in China.(Report)(Author abstract)
descriptionTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.040 Byline: Yao Lu, Lijian Qin Abstract: The existing literature has often underscored the "healthy migrant" effect and the "salmon bias" in understanding the health of migrants. Nevertheless, direct evidence for these two hypotheses, particularly the "salmon bias," is limited. Using data from a national longitudinal survey conducted between 2003 and 2007 in China, we provide tests of these hypotheses in the case of internal migration in China. To examine the healthy migrant effect, we study how pre-migration self-reported health is associated with an individual's decision to migrate and the distance of migration. To test the salmon bias hypothesis, we compare the self-reported health of migrants who stay in destinations and who return or move closer to home villages. The results provide support for both hypotheses. Specifically, healthier individuals are more likely to migrate and to move further away from home. Among migrants, those with poorer health are more likely to return or to move closer to their origin communities. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA (b) Finance and Public Administrative School, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, #962 Caoshan Road, Bengbu City, Anhui Province, 233000, China
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abstractTo link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.11.040 Byline: Yao Lu, Lijian Qin Abstract: The existing literature has often underscored the "healthy migrant" effect and the "salmon bias" in understanding the health of migrants. Nevertheless, direct evidence for these two hypotheses, particularly the "salmon bias," is limited. Using data from a national longitudinal survey conducted between 2003 and 2007 in China, we provide tests of these hypotheses in the case of internal migration in China. To examine the healthy migrant effect, we study how pre-migration self-reported health is associated with an individual's decision to migrate and the distance of migration. To test the salmon bias hypothesis, we compare the self-reported health of migrants who stay in destinations and who return or move closer to home villages. The results provide support for both hypotheses. Specifically, healthier individuals are more likely to migrate and to move further away from home. Among migrants, those with poorer health are more likely to return or to move closer to their origin communities. Author Affiliation: (a) Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA (b) Finance and Public Administrative School, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, #962 Caoshan Road, Bengbu City, Anhui Province, 233000, China
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