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Spontaneous endometriosis in rhesus macaques: evidence for a genetic association with specific Mamu-A1 alleles.(Report)

Endometriosis is a poorly understood common debilitating women's reproductive disorder resulting from proliferative and ectopic endometrial tissue associated with variable clinical symptoms including dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods), dyspareunia (pain on intercourse), female infertility, and... Full description

Journal Title: Primate Biology June 22, 2017, Vol.4(1), p.117
Main Author: Kondova, Ivanela
Other Authors: Braskamp, Gerco , Heidt, Peter J. , Collignon, Wim , Haaksma, Tom , de Groot, Nanine , Otting, Nel , Doxiadis, Gaby , Westmoreland, Susan V. , Vallender, Eric J. , Bontrop, Ronald E.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 2363-4707
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recordid: gale_ofa496479754
title: Spontaneous endometriosis in rhesus macaques: evidence for a genetic association with specific Mamu-A1 alleles.(Report)
format: Article
creator:
  • Kondova, Ivanela
  • Braskamp, Gerco
  • Heidt, Peter J.
  • Collignon, Wim
  • Haaksma, Tom
  • de Groot, Nanine
  • Otting, Nel
  • Doxiadis, Gaby
  • Westmoreland, Susan V.
  • Vallender, Eric J.
  • Bontrop, Ronald E.
subjects:
  • Endometriosis – Risk Factors
  • Rhesus Monkey – Health Aspects
  • Rhesus Monkey – Genetic Aspects
ispartof: Primate Biology, June 22, 2017, Vol.4(1), p.117
description: Endometriosis is a poorly understood common debilitating women's reproductive disorder resulting from proliferative and ectopic endometrial tissue associated with variable clinical symptoms including dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods), dyspareunia (pain on intercourse), female infertility, and an increased risk of malignant transformation. The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) develops a spontaneous endometriosis that is very similar to that seen in women. We hypothesized that specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. As part of a collaboration between the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC) in the Netherlands and the New England Primate Research Center (NEPRC) in the United States, we analyzed DNA sequences of MHC class I (Macaca mulatta, Mamu-A1) and class II (Mamu-DRB) alleles from rhesus macaques with endometriosis and compared the allele frequencies with those of age-matched healthy macaques. We demonstrate that two MHC class I alleles are overrepresented in diseased macaques compared to controls: Mamu-A1*001, 33.3 % in BPRC animals with endometriosis vs. 11.6 % in healthy macaques (p = 0.007), and Mamu-A1*007, 21.9 % NEPRC rhesus macaques vs. 6.7 %, (p = 0.003). We provide evidence that select MHC class I alleles are associated with endometriosis in rhesus macaques and suggest that the disease pathogenesis contribution of MHC class I warrants further research.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 2363-4707
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2363-4707
  • 23634707
url: Link


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titleSpontaneous endometriosis in rhesus macaques: evidence for a genetic association with specific Mamu-A1 alleles.(Report)
creatorKondova, Ivanela ; Braskamp, Gerco ; Heidt, Peter J. ; Collignon, Wim ; Haaksma, Tom ; de Groot, Nanine ; Otting, Nel ; Doxiadis, Gaby ; Westmoreland, Susan V. ; Vallender, Eric J. ; Bontrop, Ronald E.
ispartofPrimate Biology, June 22, 2017, Vol.4(1), p.117
identifierISSN: 2363-4707
subjectEndometriosis – Risk Factors ; Rhesus Monkey – Health Aspects ; Rhesus Monkey – Genetic Aspects
descriptionEndometriosis is a poorly understood common debilitating women's reproductive disorder resulting from proliferative and ectopic endometrial tissue associated with variable clinical symptoms including dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods), dyspareunia (pain on intercourse), female infertility, and an increased risk of malignant transformation. The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) develops a spontaneous endometriosis that is very similar to that seen in women. We hypothesized that specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. As part of a collaboration between the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC) in the Netherlands and the New England Primate Research Center (NEPRC) in the United States, we analyzed DNA sequences of MHC class I (Macaca mulatta, Mamu-A1) and class II (Mamu-DRB) alleles from rhesus macaques with endometriosis and compared the allele frequencies with those of age-matched healthy macaques. We demonstrate that two MHC class I alleles are overrepresented in diseased macaques compared to controls: Mamu-A1*001, 33.3 % in BPRC animals with endometriosis vs. 11.6 % in healthy macaques (p = 0.007), and Mamu-A1*007, 21.9 % NEPRC rhesus macaques vs. 6.7 %, (p = 0.003). We provide evidence that select MHC class I alleles are associated with endometriosis in rhesus macaques and suggest that the disease pathogenesis contribution of MHC class I warrants further research.
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titleSpontaneous endometriosis in rhesus macaques: evidence for a genetic association with specific Mamu-A1 alleles.(Report)
descriptionEndometriosis is a poorly understood common debilitating women's reproductive disorder resulting from proliferative and ectopic endometrial tissue associated with variable clinical symptoms including dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods), dyspareunia (pain on intercourse), female infertility, and an increased risk of malignant transformation. The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) develops a spontaneous endometriosis that is very similar to that seen in women. We hypothesized that specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. As part of a collaboration between the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC) in the Netherlands and the New England Primate Research Center (NEPRC) in the United States, we analyzed DNA sequences of MHC class I (Macaca mulatta, Mamu-A1) and class II (Mamu-DRB) alleles from rhesus macaques with endometriosis and compared the allele frequencies with those of age-matched healthy macaques. We demonstrate that two MHC class I alleles are overrepresented in diseased macaques compared to controls: Mamu-A1*001, 33.3 % in BPRC animals with endometriosis vs. 11.6 % in healthy macaques (p = 0.007), and Mamu-A1*007, 21.9 % NEPRC rhesus macaques vs. 6.7 %, (p = 0.003). We provide evidence that select MHC class I alleles are associated with endometriosis in rhesus macaques and suggest that the disease pathogenesis contribution of MHC class I warrants further research.
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abstractEndometriosis is a poorly understood common debilitating women's reproductive disorder resulting from proliferative and ectopic endometrial tissue associated with variable clinical symptoms including dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual periods), dyspareunia (pain on intercourse), female infertility, and an increased risk of malignant transformation. The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) develops a spontaneous endometriosis that is very similar to that seen in women. We hypothesized that specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles may contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. As part of a collaboration between the Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC) in the Netherlands and the New England Primate Research Center (NEPRC) in the United States, we analyzed DNA sequences of MHC class I (Macaca mulatta, Mamu-A1) and class II (Mamu-DRB) alleles from rhesus macaques with endometriosis and compared the allele frequencies with those of age-matched healthy macaques. We demonstrate that two MHC class I alleles are overrepresented in diseased macaques compared to controls: Mamu-A1*001, 33.3 % in BPRC animals with endometriosis vs. 11.6 % in healthy macaques (p = 0.007), and Mamu-A1*007, 21.9 % NEPRC rhesus macaques vs. 6.7 %, (p = 0.003). We provide evidence that select MHC class I alleles are associated with endometriosis in rhesus macaques and suggest that the disease pathogenesis contribution of MHC class I warrants further research.
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