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An extraordinary truth? The Ādam "suicide" notes from Bangladesh

In 2007, nine members of the Ādam family committed suicide in a small town of Bangladesh. They had left suicide notes inside the house. The Ādams believed in an anti-Islamic faith, the Ādam "religion," founded by the father, Abdul Ādam, who had died seven years ago. Only one of the members of the Ād... Full description

Journal Title: Mental Health Religion & Culture, 01 April 2010, Vol.13(3), pp.223-244
Main Author: Selim, Nasima
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1367-4676 ; E-ISSN: 1469-9737 ; DOI: 10.1080/13674670903061230
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recordid: informaworld_s10_1080_13674670903061230
title: An extraordinary truth? The Ādam "suicide" notes from Bangladesh
format: Article
creator:
  • Selim, Nasima
subjects:
  • Suicide
  • New Religion
  • Islam
  • Ādam
  • Delusion
  • Kufri Kalam
  • Bangladesh
  • Religion
  • Anthropology
  • Psychology
ispartof: Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 01 April 2010, Vol.13(3), pp.223-244
description: In 2007, nine members of the Ādam family committed suicide in a small town of Bangladesh. They had left suicide notes inside the house. The Ādams believed in an anti-Islamic faith, the Ādam "religion," founded by the father, Abdul Ādam, who had died seven years ago. Only one of the members of the Ādam family is still alive, a daughter who was not part of the mass suicide. Most newspapers in the country reported the incident, but few journalists explored the story in depth. Based on a close reading of the suicide notes and a brief analysis of the major newspaper reports, the author argues that while the Ādam "religion" was rooted in the Be-shara (against orthodoxy) tradition within Islam, the Ādams were also suffering from a shared delusion. The Ādams probably practiced kufri kalam (underground satanic practice), and they were part of the sub-culture of protest existing in contemporary Bangladesh.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1367-4676 ; E-ISSN: 1469-9737 ; DOI: 10.1080/13674670903061230
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1367-4676
  • 13674676
  • 1469-9737
  • 14699737
url: Link


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descriptionIn 2007, nine members of the Ādam family committed suicide in a small town of Bangladesh. They had left suicide notes inside the house. The Ādams believed in an anti-Islamic faith, the Ādam "religion," founded by the father, Abdul Ādam, who had died seven years ago. Only one of the members of the Ādam family is still alive, a daughter who was not part of the mass suicide. Most newspapers in the country reported the incident, but few journalists explored the story in depth. Based on a close reading of the suicide notes and a brief analysis of the major newspaper reports, the author argues that while the Ādam "religion" was rooted in the Be-shara (against orthodoxy) tradition within Islam, the Ādams were also suffering from a shared delusion. The Ādams probably practiced kufri kalam (underground satanic practice), and they were part of the sub-culture of protest existing in contemporary Bangladesh.
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In 2007, nine members of the Ādam family committed suicide in a small town of Bangladesh. They had left suicide notes inside the house. The Ādams believed in an anti-Islamic faith, the Ādam "religion," founded by the father, Abdul Ādam, who had died seven years ago. Only one of the members of the Ādam family is still alive, a daughter who was not part of the mass suicide. Most newspapers in the country reported the incident, but few journalists explored the story in depth. Based on a close reading of the suicide notes and a brief analysis of the major newspaper reports, the author argues that while the Ādam "religion" was rooted in the Be-shara (against orthodoxy) tradition within Islam, the Ādams were also suffering from a shared delusion. The Ādams probably practiced kufri kalam (underground satanic practice), and they were part of the sub-culture of protest existing in contemporary Bangladesh.

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In 2007, nine members of the Ādam family committed suicide in a small town of Bangladesh. They had left suicide notes inside the house. The Ādams believed in an anti-Islamic faith, the Ādam "religion," founded by the father, Abdul Ādam, who had died seven years ago. Only one of the members of the Ādam family is still alive, a daughter who was not part of the mass suicide. Most newspapers in the country reported the incident, but few journalists explored the story in depth. Based on a close reading of the suicide notes and a brief analysis of the major newspaper reports, the author argues that while the Ādam "religion" was rooted in the Be-shara (against orthodoxy) tradition within Islam, the Ādams were also suffering from a shared delusion. The Ādams probably practiced kufri kalam (underground satanic practice), and they were part of the sub-culture of protest existing in contemporary Bangladesh.

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doi10.1080/13674670903061230
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date2010-04-01