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Are Americans Really in Favor of Interracial Marriage? A Closer Look at When They Are Asked About Black-White Marriage for Their Relatives

This study transcends general opinion reports and uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) to examine responses on attitudinal questions about how Black and White Americans actually feel about their close relative marrying outside their own race. The results show that more than half (54%) of B... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Black Studies 1 September 2014, Vol.45(6), pp.528-544
Main Author: Djamba, Yanyi K.
Other Authors: Kimuna, Sitawa R.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 00219347
Link: https://www.jstor.org/stable/24572833
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recordid: jstor_archive_124572833
title: Are Americans Really in Favor of Interracial Marriage? A Closer Look at When They Are Asked About Black-White Marriage for Their Relatives
format: Article
creator:
  • Djamba, Yanyi K.
  • Kimuna, Sitawa R.
subjects:
  • Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies
  • Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology
  • Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology
  • Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies
  • Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies
  • Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology
  • Religion -- Spiritual belief systems -- Christianity
  • Education -- Formal education -- Educational institutions
  • Political science -- Political philosophy -- Political ideologies
  • Political science -- Political philosophy -- Political ideologies
ispartof: Journal of Black Studies, 1 September 2014, Vol.45(6), pp.528-544
description: This study transcends general opinion reports and uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) to examine responses on attitudinal questions about how Black and White Americans actually feel about their close relative marrying outside their own race. The results show that more than half (54%) of Black Americans are in favor of their close relative marrying a White person compared with nearly one-in-four (26%) White Americans who said they were in favor of their close relative marrying a Black person. Such results suggest that questions about how individuals feel when close relatives engage into Black-White marriage provide better measures of attitude toward racial exogamy. Logistic regression models are analyzed to determine how socio-demographic factors influence Black and White Americans' views on interracial marriage of their close relatives.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 00219347
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0021-9347
  • 00219347
url: Link


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subjectBehavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies ; Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology ; Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology ; Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies ; Behavioral sciences -- Sociology -- Human societies ; Behavioral sciences -- Anthropology -- Ethnology ; Religion -- Spiritual belief systems -- Christianity ; Education -- Formal education -- Educational institutions ; Political science -- Political philosophy -- Political ideologies ; Political science -- Political philosophy -- Political ideologies
descriptionThis study transcends general opinion reports and uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) to examine responses on attitudinal questions about how Black and White Americans actually feel about their close relative marrying outside their own race. The results show that more than half (54%) of Black Americans are in favor of their close relative marrying a White person compared with nearly one-in-four (26%) White Americans who said they were in favor of their close relative marrying a Black person. Such results suggest that questions about how individuals feel when close relatives engage into Black-White marriage provide better measures of attitude toward racial exogamy. Logistic regression models are analyzed to determine how socio-demographic factors influence Black and White Americans' views on interracial marriage of their close relatives.
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abstractThis study transcends general opinion reports and uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) to examine responses on attitudinal questions about how Black and White Americans actually feel about their close relative marrying outside their own race. The results show that more than half (54%) of Black Americans are in favor of their close relative marrying a White person compared with nearly one-in-four (26%) White Americans who said they were in favor of their close relative marrying a Black person. Such results suggest that questions about how individuals feel when close relatives engage into Black-White marriage provide better measures of attitude toward racial exogamy. Logistic regression models are analyzed to determine how socio-demographic factors influence Black and White Americans' views on interracial marriage of their close relatives.
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date2014-09-01