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Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in relation to body mass index and polycystic ovarian syndrome in Indian women

Objective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MBS) in Indian women and to see how does it correlate to body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in this population. Study Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Infertility clinic of a tertiary... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences 2015, Vol.8(4), p.202-208
Main Author: Sharma, Sangita
Other Authors: Majumdar, Abha
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0974-1208 ; DOI: 10.4103/0974-1208.170394
Link: http://www.jhrsonline.org/article.asp?issn=0974-1208;year=2015;volume=8;issue=4;spage=202;epage=208;aulast=Sharma;type=0
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recordid: medknowJHumReprodSci_2015_8_4_202_170394
title: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in relation to body mass index and polycystic ovarian syndrome in Indian women
format: Article
creator:
  • Sharma, Sangita
  • Majumdar, Abha
subjects:
  • Body mass index
  • metabolic syndrome
  • obesity
  • polycystic ovarian syndrome
ispartof: Journal of Human Reproductive Sciences, 2015, Vol.8(4), p.202-208
description: Objective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MBS) in Indian women and to see how does it correlate to body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in this population. Study Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Infertility clinic of a tertiary center.  Materials and Methods: Two hundred women, 120 with PCOs and 80 age-matched controls were enrolled. The prevalence of MBS was studied in the women with and without and was co related to BMI by further subgrouping as team (BMI 23 kg/m2). The sample size was: team controls-40, obese controls-40, team PCOS-80. Each subject underwent a physical examination and laboratory evaluation for the diagnosis of MBS, which was defined according to the guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Pamel (NCEP ATP III) 2005. INTERVENTION: None. Main Outcome Measures: Main Outcome Measures: Subjects with and without PCOs were compared with each other for the prevalence of MBS, and similarly team subjects were compared with obese subjects. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for both the PCOS and non PCOS population separately, co-relating the prevalence of MBS with BMI. These ROC curves were used to establish the cut off values of BMI, which could best predict the risk of MBS. Results: The prevalence of MBS was significantly higher in the women with PCOS, as compared to age-matched controls. Similarly, when BMI was considered, MBS was more prevalent in overweight subjects than in lean subjects with or without PCOS. In subgroup analysis, the presence of PCOS had a lesser impact on the prevalence of MBS as compared to non-PCOS controls with higher BMI. The relative risk of MBS increased as follows: lean controls-1, lean PCOS-2.66, obese controls-5.33, and obese PCOS-6.5. The most appropriate cut-off level of BMI for predicting the risk of MBS in Indian women without PCOS seems to be 23 kg/m 2 , whereas, with PCOS, it was 22.5 kg/m 2 . Conclusion: MBS is more prevalent in women with PCOS. However, obesity is an independent and stronger risk factor for developing MBS. To reduce the risk of MBS and its related long-term health consequences, lifestyle modification is advisable above BMI of 23 kg/m 2 in the normal population and 22.5 kg/m 2 in women with PCOS.
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identifier: ISSN: 0974-1208 ; DOI: 10.4103/0974-1208.170394
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0974-1208
  • 1998-4766
  • 09741208
  • 19984766
url: Link


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titlePrevalence of metabolic syndrome in relation to body mass index and polycystic ovarian syndrome in Indian women
creatorSharma, Sangita ; Majumdar, Abha
ispartofJournal of Human Reproductive Sciences, 2015, Vol.8(4), p.202-208
identifierISSN: 0974-1208 ; DOI: 10.4103/0974-1208.170394
subjectBody mass index; metabolic syndrome; obesity; polycystic ovarian syndrome
descriptionObjective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MBS) in Indian women and to see how does it correlate to body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in this population. Study Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Infertility clinic of a tertiary center.  Materials and Methods: Two hundred women, 120 with PCOs and 80 age-matched controls were enrolled. The prevalence of MBS was studied in the women with and without and was co related to BMI by further subgrouping as team (BMI <23 kg/m3) and obese (BMI >23 kg/m2). The sample size was: team controls-40, obese controls-40, team PCOS-80. Each subject underwent a physical examination and laboratory evaluation for the diagnosis of MBS, which was defined according to the guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Pamel (NCEP ATP III) 2005. INTERVENTION: None. Main Outcome Measures: Main Outcome Measures: Subjects with and without PCOs were compared with each other for the prevalence of MBS, and similarly team subjects were compared with obese subjects. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for both the PCOS and non PCOS population separately, co-relating the prevalence of MBS with BMI. These ROC curves were used to establish the cut off values of BMI, which could best predict the risk of MBS. Results: The prevalence of MBS was significantly higher in the women with PCOS, as compared to age-matched controls. Similarly, when BMI was considered, MBS was more prevalent in overweight subjects than in lean subjects with or without PCOS. In subgroup analysis, the presence of PCOS had a lesser impact on the prevalence of MBS as compared to non-PCOS controls with higher BMI. The relative risk of MBS increased as follows: lean controls-1, lean PCOS-2.66, obese controls-5.33, and obese PCOS-6.5. The most appropriate cut-off level of BMI for predicting the risk of MBS in Indian women without PCOS seems to be 23 kg/m 2 , whereas, with PCOS, it was 22.5 kg/m 2 . Conclusion: MBS is more prevalent in women with PCOS. However, obesity is an independent and stronger risk factor for developing MBS. To reduce the risk of MBS and its related long-term health consequences, lifestyle modification is advisable above BMI of 23 kg/m 2 in the normal population and 22.5 kg/m 2 in women with PCOS.
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titlePrevalence of metabolic syndrome in relation to body mass index and polycystic ovarian syndrome in Indian women
descriptionObjective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MBS) in Indian women and to see how does it correlate to body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in this population. Study Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Infertility clinic of a tertiary center.  Materials and Methods: Two hundred women, 120 with PCOs and 80 age-matched controls were enrolled. The prevalence of MBS was studied in the women with and without and was co related to BMI by further subgrouping as team (BMI <23 kg/m3) and obese (BMI >23 kg/m2). The sample size was: team controls-40, obese controls-40, team PCOS-80. Each subject underwent a physical examination and laboratory evaluation for the diagnosis of MBS, which was defined according to the guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Pamel (NCEP ATP III) 2005. INTERVENTION: None. Main Outcome Measures: Main Outcome Measures: Subjects with and without PCOs were compared with each other for the prevalence of MBS, and similarly team subjects were compared with obese subjects. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for both the PCOS and non PCOS population separately, co-relating the prevalence of MBS with BMI. These ROC curves were used to establish the cut off values of BMI, which could best predict the risk of MBS. Results: The prevalence of MBS was significantly higher in the women with PCOS, as compared to age-matched controls. Similarly, when BMI was considered, MBS was more prevalent in overweight subjects than in lean subjects with or without PCOS. In subgroup analysis, the presence of PCOS had a lesser impact on the prevalence of MBS as compared to non-PCOS controls with higher BMI. The relative risk of MBS increased as follows: lean controls-1, lean PCOS-2.66, obese controls-5.33, and obese PCOS-6.5. The most appropriate cut-off level of BMI for predicting the risk of MBS in Indian women without PCOS seems to be 23 kg/m 2 , whereas, with PCOS, it was 22.5 kg/m 2 . Conclusion: MBS is more prevalent in women with PCOS. However, obesity is an independent and stronger risk factor for developing MBS. To reduce the risk of MBS and its related long-term health consequences, lifestyle modification is advisable above BMI of 23 kg/m 2 in the normal population and 22.5 kg/m 2 in women with PCOS.
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abstractObjective: To study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MBS) in Indian women and to see how does it correlate to body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in this population. Study Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Infertility clinic of a tertiary center.  Materials and Methods: Two hundred women, 120 with PCOs and 80 age-matched controls were enrolled. The prevalence of MBS was studied in the women with and without and was co related to BMI by further subgrouping as team (BMI <23 kg/m3) and obese (BMI >23 kg/m2). The sample size was: team controls-40, obese controls-40, team PCOS-80. Each subject underwent a physical examination and laboratory evaluation for the diagnosis of MBS, which was defined according to the guidelines of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Pamel (NCEP ATP III) 2005. INTERVENTION: None. Main Outcome Measures: Main Outcome Measures: Subjects with and without PCOs were compared with each other for the prevalence of MBS, and similarly team subjects were compared with obese subjects. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for both the PCOS and non PCOS population separately, co-relating the prevalence of MBS with BMI. These ROC curves were used to establish the cut off values of BMI, which could best predict the risk of MBS. Results: The prevalence of MBS was significantly higher in the women with PCOS, as compared to age-matched controls. Similarly, when BMI was considered, MBS was more prevalent in overweight subjects than in lean subjects with or without PCOS. In subgroup analysis, the presence of PCOS had a lesser impact on the prevalence of MBS as compared to non-PCOS controls with higher BMI. The relative risk of MBS increased as follows: lean controls-1, lean PCOS-2.66, obese controls-5.33, and obese PCOS-6.5. The most appropriate cut-off level of BMI for predicting the risk of MBS in Indian women without PCOS seems to be 23 kg/m 2 , whereas, with PCOS, it was 22.5 kg/m 2 . Conclusion: MBS is more prevalent in women with PCOS. However, obesity is an independent and stronger risk factor for developing MBS. To reduce the risk of MBS and its related long-term health consequences, lifestyle modification is advisable above BMI of 23 kg/m 2 in the normal population and 22.5 kg/m 2 in women with PCOS.
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doi10.4103/0974-1208.170394
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