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Social roles, context and evolution in the origins of depression

This paper reviews the author's research on the social origins of depression begun in the early 1970s. It emphasizes the importance of taking account of the context and meaning of proximal causal factors by the use of investigator-based ratings using intensive interviews and the need to extend resea... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of health and social behavior September 2002, Vol.43(3), pp.255-76
Main Author: Brown, George W
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-1465 ; PMID: 12467252 Version:1
Link: http://pubmed.gov/12467252
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recordid: medline12467252
title: Social roles, context and evolution in the origins of depression
format: Article
creator:
  • Brown, George W
subjects:
  • Role
  • Social Behavior
  • Social Environment
  • Depressive Disorder -- Etiology
ispartof: Journal of health and social behavior, September 2002, Vol.43(3), pp.255-76
description: This paper reviews the author's research on the social origins of depression begun in the early 1970s. It emphasizes the importance of taking account of the context and meaning of proximal causal factors by the use of investigator-based ratings using intensive interviews and the need to extend research to cover a whole lifetime. The implications of the research program that has involved some twenty inquiries in a variety of cultural settings is discussed in terms of the importance of both a comparative and an evolutionary perspective concerning meaning that bring together the biology involved in an evolutionary perspective emphasizing a common human nature with one that takes account of cultural and individual differences. In short an approach that take seriously a biopsychosocial perspective.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-1465 ; PMID: 12467252 Version:1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00221465
  • 0022-1465
url: Link


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descriptionThis paper reviews the author's research on the social origins of depression begun in the early 1970s. It emphasizes the importance of taking account of the context and meaning of proximal causal factors by the use of investigator-based ratings using intensive interviews and the need to extend research to cover a whole lifetime. The implications of the research program that has involved some twenty inquiries in a variety of cultural settings is discussed in terms of the importance of both a comparative and an evolutionary perspective concerning meaning that bring together the biology involved in an evolutionary perspective emphasizing a common human nature with one that takes account of cultural and individual differences. In short an approach that take seriously a biopsychosocial perspective.
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abstractThis paper reviews the author's research on the social origins of depression begun in the early 1970s. It emphasizes the importance of taking account of the context and meaning of proximal causal factors by the use of investigator-based ratings using intensive interviews and the need to extend research to cover a whole lifetime. The implications of the research program that has involved some twenty inquiries in a variety of cultural settings is discussed in terms of the importance of both a comparative and an evolutionary perspective concerning meaning that bring together the biology involved in an evolutionary perspective emphasizing a common human nature with one that takes account of cultural and individual differences. In short an approach that take seriously a biopsychosocial perspective.
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date2002-09-01