schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Role of chromium in human health and in diabetes

Despite widespread use by patients with diabetes and anecdotal reports in the past regarding its efficacy, until recently, data in humans concerning chromium’s effects on insulin action in vivo or on cellular aspects of insulin action were scarce. Consequently, significant controversy still exists r... Full description

Journal Title: Diabetes care November 2004, Vol.27(11), pp.2741-51
Main Author: Cefalu, William T
Other Authors: Hu, Frank B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0149-5992 ; PMID: 15505017 Version:1
Link: http://pubmed.gov/15505017
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: medline15505017
title: Role of chromium in human health and in diabetes
format: Article
creator:
  • Cefalu, William T
  • Hu, Frank B
subjects:
  • Health
  • Chromium -- Therapeutic Use
  • Diabetes Mellitus -- Drug Therapy
ispartof: Diabetes care, November 2004, Vol.27(11), pp.2741-51
description: Despite widespread use by patients with diabetes and anecdotal reports in the past regarding its efficacy, until recently, data in humans concerning chromium’s effects on insulin action in vivo or on cellular aspects of insulin action were scarce. Consequently, significant controversy still exists regarding the effect of chromium supplementation on parameters assessing human health. Furthermore, elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which chromium supplements affect carbohydrate metabolism in vivo is necessary before specific recommendations can be made regarding its routine use in the management of diabetes. This review focuses on providing current information about this trace mineral’s specific mechanisms of action and clinical trials in patients with diabetes. Chromium, one of the most common elements in the earth’s crust and seawater, exists in our environment in several oxidation states, principally as metallic (Cr), trivalent (+3), and hexavalent (+6) chromium. The latter is largely synthesized by the oxidation of the more common and naturally occurring trivalent chromium and is highly toxic. Trivalent chromium, found in most foods and nutrient supplements, is an essential nutrient with very low toxicity. The interest in chromium as a nutritional enhancement to glucose metabolism can be traced back to the 1950s, when it was suggested that brewer’s yeast contained a glucose tolerance factor (GTF) that prevented diabetes in experimental animals (1). This factor was eventually suggested to be a biologically active form of trivalent chromium that could substantially lower plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice (2). Interest regarding chromium administration in patients with diabetes was kindled by the observation in the 1970s that it truly was an essential nutrient required for normal carbohydrate metabolism. A patient receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) developed severe signs of diabetes, including weight loss and hyperglycemia that was refractory to increasing insulin dosing (3). Based on previous animal studies …
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0149-5992 ; PMID: 15505017 Version:1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 01495992
  • 0149-5992
url: Link


@attributes
ID1250624960
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid15505017
sourceidmedline
recordidTN_medline15505017
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid223047434
display
typearticle
titleRole of chromium in human health and in diabetes
creatorCefalu, William T ; Hu, Frank B
ispartofDiabetes care, November 2004, Vol.27(11), pp.2741-51
identifierISSN: 0149-5992 ; PMID: 15505017 Version:1
subjectHealth ; Chromium -- Therapeutic Use ; Diabetes Mellitus -- Drug Therapy
languageeng
source
descriptionDespite widespread use by patients with diabetes and anecdotal reports in the past regarding its efficacy, until recently, data in humans concerning chromium’s effects on insulin action in vivo or on cellular aspects of insulin action were scarce. Consequently, significant controversy still exists regarding the effect of chromium supplementation on parameters assessing human health. Furthermore, elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which chromium supplements affect carbohydrate metabolism in vivo is necessary before specific recommendations can be made regarding its routine use in the management of diabetes. This review focuses on providing current information about this trace mineral’s specific mechanisms of action and clinical trials in patients with diabetes. Chromium, one of the most common elements in the earth’s crust and seawater, exists in our environment in several oxidation states, principally as metallic (Cr), trivalent (+3), and hexavalent (+6) chromium. The latter is largely synthesized by the oxidation of the more common and naturally occurring trivalent chromium and is highly toxic. Trivalent chromium, found in most foods and nutrient supplements, is an essential nutrient with very low toxicity. The interest in chromium as a nutritional enhancement to glucose metabolism can be traced back to the 1950s, when it was suggested that brewer’s yeast contained a glucose tolerance factor (GTF) that prevented diabetes in experimental animals (1). This factor was eventually suggested to be a biologically active form of trivalent chromium that could substantially lower plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice (2). Interest regarding chromium administration in patients with diabetes was kindled by the observation in the 1970s that it truly was an essential nutrient required for normal carbohydrate metabolism. A patient receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) developed severe signs of diabetes, including weight loss and hyperglycemia that was refractory to increasing insulin dosing (3). Based on previous animal studies …
version5
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://pubmed.gov/15505017$$EView_this_record_in_MEDLINE/PubMed
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutMedline.html$$EView_the_MEDLINE/PubMed_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Cefalu, William T
1Hu, Frank B
titleRole of chromium in human health and in diabetes
subject
0Health
1Chromium -- Therapeutic Use
2Diabetes Mellitus -- Drug Therapy
general
015505017
1English
2MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
3MEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
sourceidmedline
recordidmedline15505017
issn
001495992
10149-5992
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2004
addtitleDiabetes care
searchscope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
scope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
lsr41200411
citationpf 2741 vol 27 issue 11
startdate20041101
enddate20041131
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[doi, description, pqid, eissn]
sort
titleRole of chromium in human health and in diabetes
authorCefalu, William T ; Hu, Frank B
creationdate20041100
lso0120041100
facets
frbrgroupid5085778743278912178
frbrtype5
newrecords20190701
languageeng
creationdate2004
topic
0Health
1Chromium–Therapeutic Use
2Diabetes Mellitus–Drug Therapy
collectionMEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Cefalu, William T
1Hu, Frank B
jtitleDiabetes Care
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Cefalu
1Hu
aufirst
0William T
1Frank B
au
0Cefalu, William T
1Hu, Frank B
atitleRole of chromium in human health and in diabetes
jtitleDiabetes care
risdate200411
volume27
issue11
spage2741
pages2741-51
issn0149-5992
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
pmid15505017
doi10.2337/diacare.27.11.2741
eissn19355548
date2004-11