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Thermogenesis, food intake and serum leptin in cold-exposed lactating Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii

Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of experimental biology February 2007, Vol.210(Pt 3), pp.512-21
Main Author: Zhang, Xue-Ying
Other Authors: Wang, De-Hua
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0022-0949 ; PMID: 17234621 Version:1
Link: http://pubmed.gov/17234621
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recordid: medline17234621
title: Thermogenesis, food intake and serum leptin in cold-exposed lactating Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii
format: Article
creator:
  • Zhang, Xue-Ying
  • Wang, De-Hua
subjects:
  • Cold Temperature
  • Eating
  • Thermogenesis
  • Arvicolinae -- Physiology
  • Lactation -- Physiology
  • Leptin -- Blood
ispartof: The Journal of experimental biology, February 2007, Vol.210(Pt 3), pp.512-21
description: Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii could adjust energy intake and thermogenesis to accommodate simultaneous lactation and cold exposure. The voles were placed into two temperature treatments: warm (23+/-1 degrees C) and cold (5+/-1 degrees C). Animals at each temperature treatment were further divided into two groups: non-reproductive (NR) and lactating females. We found that lactating voles at peak lactation in the cold enhanced food intake by 2.6 g day(-1) compared with those in the warm, and increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), to the same level as the cold-exposed NR females. Serum leptin levels decreased significantly during lactation and were positively...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0022-0949 ; PMID: 17234621 Version:1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00220949
  • 0022-0949
url: Link


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titleThermogenesis, food intake and serum leptin in cold-exposed lactating Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii
creatorZhang, Xue-Ying ; Wang, De-Hua
ispartofThe Journal of experimental biology, February 2007, Vol.210(Pt 3), pp.512-21
identifierISSN: 0022-0949 ; PMID: 17234621 Version:1
subjectCold Temperature ; Eating ; Thermogenesis ; Arvicolinae -- Physiology ; Lactation -- Physiology ; Leptin -- Blood
descriptionLactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii could adjust energy intake and thermogenesis to accommodate simultaneous lactation and cold exposure. The voles were placed into two temperature treatments: warm (23+/-1 degrees C) and cold (5+/-1 degrees C). Animals at each temperature treatment were further divided into two groups: non-reproductive (NR) and lactating females. We found that lactating voles at peak lactation in the cold enhanced food intake by 2.6 g day(-1) compared with those in the warm, and increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), to the same level as the cold-exposed NR females. Serum leptin levels decreased significantly during lactation and were positively...
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titleThermogenesis, food intake and serum leptin in cold-exposed lactating Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii
descriptionLactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii could adjust energy intake and thermogenesis to accommodate simultaneous lactation and cold exposure. The voles were placed into two temperature treatments: warm (23+/-1 degrees C) and cold (5+/-1 degrees C). Animals at each temperature treatment were further divided into two groups: non-reproductive (NR) and lactating females. We found that lactating voles at peak lactation in the cold enhanced food intake by 2.6 g day(-1) compared with those in the warm, and increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), to the same level as the cold-exposed NR females. Serum leptin levels decreased significantly during lactation and were positively...
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abstractLactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii could adjust energy intake and thermogenesis to accommodate simultaneous lactation and cold exposure. The voles were placed into two temperature treatments: warm (23+/-1 degrees C) and cold (5+/-1 degrees C). Animals at each temperature treatment were further divided into two groups: non-reproductive (NR) and lactating females. We found that lactating voles at peak lactation in the cold enhanced food intake by 2.6 g day(-1) compared with those in the warm, and increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), to the same level as the cold-exposed NR females. Serum leptin levels decreased significantly during lactation and were positively...
pmid17234621
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