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'It's not that we hate you': understanding children's gender attitudes and expectancies about peer relationships

Widespread gender segregation, evident throughout elementary school, seems to imply that girls and boys have negative feelings and thoughts about one another, and classic theories of inter-group processes support this idea. However, research has generally overlooked children's feelings and perceptio... Full description

Journal Title: The British journal of developmental psychology June 2011, Vol.29(Pt 2), pp.288-304
Main Author: Zosuls, Kristina M
Other Authors: Martin, Carol Lynn , Ruble, Diane N , Miller, Cindy F , Gaertner, Bridget M , England, Dawn E , Hill, Alison P
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0261-510X ; PMID: 21592150 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-835X.2010.02023.x
Link: http://pubmed.gov/21592150
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recordid: medline21592150
title: 'It's not that we hate you': understanding children's gender attitudes and expectancies about peer relationships
format: Article
creator:
  • Zosuls, Kristina M
  • Martin, Carol Lynn
  • Ruble, Diane N
  • Miller, Cindy F
  • Gaertner, Bridget M
  • England, Dawn E
  • Hill, Alison P
subjects:
  • Anticipation, Psychological
  • Attitude
  • Gender Identity
  • Hate
  • Peer Group
ispartof: The British journal of developmental psychology, June 2011, Vol.29(Pt 2), pp.288-304
description: Widespread gender segregation, evident throughout elementary school, seems to imply that girls and boys have negative feelings and thoughts about one another, and classic theories of inter-group processes support this idea. However, research has generally overlooked children's feelings and perceptions about gender-related interpersonal interactions. This paper investigates the nature of children's attitudes about same- and other-gender peers, and explores how those attitudes relate to the expectancies and beliefs children hold about same- and other-gender peer interactions. Children (N= 98 fifth graders) completed questionnaires assessing their global liking of own- and other-gender peers (Yee & Brown, 1994), positive and negative attitudes about own- and other-gender peers, and outcome expectancies related to interacting with own- and other-gender peers. Results indicated that rather than being characterized by out-group negativity, children's inter-group gender attitudes are best characterized...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0261-510X ; PMID: 21592150 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-835X.2010.02023.x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0261510X
  • 0261-510X
url: Link


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descriptionWidespread gender segregation, evident throughout elementary school, seems to imply that girls and boys have negative feelings and thoughts about one another, and classic theories of inter-group processes support this idea. However, research has generally overlooked children's feelings and perceptions about gender-related interpersonal interactions. This paper investigates the nature of children's attitudes about same- and other-gender peers, and explores how those attitudes relate to the expectancies and beliefs children hold about same- and other-gender peer interactions. Children (N= 98 fifth graders) completed questionnaires assessing their global liking of own- and other-gender peers (Yee & Brown, 1994), positive and negative attitudes about own- and other-gender peers, and outcome expectancies related to interacting with own- and other-gender peers. Results indicated that rather than being characterized by out-group negativity, children's inter-group gender attitudes are best characterized...
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abstractWidespread gender segregation, evident throughout elementary school, seems to imply that girls and boys have negative feelings and thoughts about one another, and classic theories of inter-group processes support this idea. However, research has generally overlooked children's feelings and perceptions about gender-related interpersonal interactions. This paper investigates the nature of children's attitudes about same- and other-gender peers, and explores how those attitudes relate to the expectancies and beliefs children hold about same- and other-gender peer interactions. Children (N= 98 fifth graders) completed questionnaires assessing their global liking of own- and other-gender peers (Yee & Brown, 1994), positive and negative attitudes about own- and other-gender peers, and outcome expectancies related to interacting with own- and other-gender peers. Results indicated that rather than being characterized by out-group negativity, children's inter-group gender attitudes are best characterized...
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