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Archaeosomes with encapsulated antigens for oral vaccine delivery

Traditional phosphodiester lipid vesicles (liposomes) are not stable and could be easily degraded in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We prepared a novel lipid based oral delivery system: archaeosomes, made of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) extracted from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and tested the... Full description

Journal Title: Vaccine 18 July 2011, Vol.29(32), pp.5260-6
Main Author: Li, Zhengrong
Other Authors: Zhang, Lihui , Sun, Wenqiang , Ding, Qian , Hou, Yongtai , Xu, Yuhong
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1873-2518 ; PMID: 21609747 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.05.015
Link: http://pubmed.gov/21609747
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recordid: medline21609747
title: Archaeosomes with encapsulated antigens for oral vaccine delivery
format: Article
creator:
  • Li, Zhengrong
  • Zhang, Lihui
  • Sun, Wenqiang
  • Ding, Qian
  • Hou, Yongtai
  • Xu, Yuhong
subjects:
  • Adjuvants, Immunologic -- Administration & Dosage
  • Antigens -- Immunology
  • Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius -- Immunology
  • Vaccines -- Administration & Dosage
ispartof: Vaccine, 18 July 2011, Vol.29(32), pp.5260-6
description: Traditional phosphodiester lipid vesicles (liposomes) are not stable and could be easily degraded in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We prepared a novel lipid based oral delivery system: archaeosomes, made of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) extracted from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and tested their immunogenic potentials as oral vaccine delivery vehicles. Our study showed that the archaeosomes had significant superior stability in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and would help fluorescent labeled antigens to reside longer time in the GI tract after oral administration. The resulted immune responses against model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) were greatly improved, eliciting substantial IgG response systemically as well as IgA response mucosally. In addition, the archaeosomes also facilitated antigen specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation. These data indicate that archaeosomes may be a potential vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective oral immunization.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1873-2518 ; PMID: 21609747 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.05.015
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 18732518
  • 1873-2518
url: Link


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titleArchaeosomes with encapsulated antigens for oral vaccine delivery
creatorLi, Zhengrong ; Zhang, Lihui ; Sun, Wenqiang ; Ding, Qian ; Hou, Yongtai ; Xu, Yuhong
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subjectAdjuvants, Immunologic -- Administration & Dosage ; Antigens -- Immunology ; Sulfolobus Acidocaldarius -- Immunology ; Vaccines -- Administration & Dosage
descriptionTraditional phosphodiester lipid vesicles (liposomes) are not stable and could be easily degraded in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We prepared a novel lipid based oral delivery system: archaeosomes, made of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) extracted from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and tested their immunogenic potentials as oral vaccine delivery vehicles. Our study showed that the archaeosomes had significant superior stability in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and would help fluorescent labeled antigens to reside longer time in the GI tract after oral administration. The resulted immune responses against model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) were greatly improved, eliciting substantial IgG response systemically as well as IgA response mucosally. In addition, the archaeosomes also facilitated antigen specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation. These data indicate that archaeosomes may be a potential vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective oral immunization.
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titleArchaeosomes with encapsulated antigens for oral vaccine delivery
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abstractTraditional phosphodiester lipid vesicles (liposomes) are not stable and could be easily degraded in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We prepared a novel lipid based oral delivery system: archaeosomes, made of the polar lipid fraction E (PLFE) extracted from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and tested their immunogenic potentials as oral vaccine delivery vehicles. Our study showed that the archaeosomes had significant superior stability in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and would help fluorescent labeled antigens to reside longer time in the GI tract after oral administration. The resulted immune responses against model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) were greatly improved, eliciting substantial IgG response systemically as well as IgA response mucosally. In addition, the archaeosomes also facilitated antigen specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation. These data indicate that archaeosomes may be a potential vaccine carrier and adjuvant for effective oral immunization.
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