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Anaphylaxis: recognition and management

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that is almost always unanticipated and may lead to death by airway obstruction or vascular collapse. Anaphylaxis occurs as the result of an allergen response, usually immunoglobulin E-mediated, which leads to mast cell and basoph... Full description

Journal Title: American family physician 15 November 2011, Vol.84(10), pp.1111-8
Main Author: Arnold, James J
Other Authors: Williams, Pamela M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1532-0650 ; PMID: 22085665 Version:1
Link: http://pubmed.gov/22085665
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recordid: medline22085665
title: Anaphylaxis: recognition and management
format: Article
creator:
  • Arnold, James J
  • Williams, Pamela M
subjects:
  • Anaphylaxis -- Diagnosis
ispartof: American family physician, 15 November 2011, Vol.84(10), pp.1111-8
description: Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that is almost always unanticipated and may lead to death by airway obstruction or vascular collapse. Anaphylaxis occurs as the result of an allergen response, usually immunoglobulin E-mediated, which leads to mast cell and basophil activation and a combination of dermatologic, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic symptoms. Dermatologic and respiratory symptoms are most common, occurring in 90 and 70 percent of episodes, respectively. The three most common triggers are food, insect stings, and medications. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is typically made when symptoms occur within one hour of exposure to a specific antigen. Confirmatory testing using serum histamine and tryptase levels is difficult, because blood samples must be drawn with strict time considerations. Allergen skin testing and in vitro assay for serum immunoglobulin E of specific allergens do not reliably predict who will develop...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1532-0650 ; PMID: 22085665 Version:1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15320650
  • 1532-0650
url: Link


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descriptionAnaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that is almost always unanticipated and may lead to death by airway obstruction or vascular collapse. Anaphylaxis occurs as the result of an allergen response, usually immunoglobulin E-mediated, which leads to mast cell and basophil activation and a combination of dermatologic, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic symptoms. Dermatologic and respiratory symptoms are most common, occurring in 90 and 70 percent of episodes, respectively. The three most common triggers are food, insect stings, and medications. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is typically made when symptoms occur within one hour of exposure to a specific antigen. Confirmatory testing using serum histamine and tryptase levels is difficult, because blood samples must be drawn with strict time considerations. Allergen skin testing and in vitro assay for serum immunoglobulin E of specific allergens do not reliably predict who will develop...
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abstractAnaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening, systemic allergic reaction that is almost always unanticipated and may lead to death by airway obstruction or vascular collapse. Anaphylaxis occurs as the result of an allergen response, usually immunoglobulin E-mediated, which leads to mast cell and basophil activation and a combination of dermatologic, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic symptoms. Dermatologic and respiratory symptoms are most common, occurring in 90 and 70 percent of episodes, respectively. The three most common triggers are food, insect stings, and medications. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is typically made when symptoms occur within one hour of exposure to a specific antigen. Confirmatory testing using serum histamine and tryptase levels is difficult, because blood samples must be drawn with strict time considerations. Allergen skin testing and in vitro assay for serum immunoglobulin E of specific allergens do not reliably predict who will develop...
pmid22085665
date2011-11-15