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Ultra high resolution fMRI at ultra-high field

In this short review article I will summarize the path we took over the years towards increasing the spatial resolution of fMRI. To fully capitalize on the fMRI technique, a better understanding of the origin of the hemodynamic signals, and what factors are governing their spatial control is necessa... Full description

Journal Title: NeuroImage 15 August 2012, Vol.62(2), pp.1024-8
Main Author: Harel, Noam
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; PMID: 22245344 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.01.018
Link: http://pubmed.gov/22245344
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recordid: medline22245344
title: Ultra high resolution fMRI at ultra-high field
format: Article
creator:
  • Harel, Noam
subjects:
  • Brain -- Blood Supply
  • Brain Mapping -- History
  • Cerebrovascular Circulation -- Physiology
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted -- History
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging -- History
ispartof: NeuroImage, 15 August 2012, Vol.62(2), pp.1024-8
description: In this short review article I will summarize the path we took over the years towards increasing the spatial resolution of fMRI. To fully capitalize on the fMRI technique, a better understanding of the origin of the hemodynamic signals, and what factors are governing their spatial control is necessary. Here, I will briefly describe the studies and developments that ultimately led to our successful effort in mapping orientation columns in humans that is considered by many as the current state-of-the-art for fMRI studies.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1095-9572 ; PMID: 22245344 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.01.018
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 10959572
  • 1095-9572
url: Link


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descriptionIn this short review article I will summarize the path we took over the years towards increasing the spatial resolution of fMRI. To fully capitalize on the fMRI technique, a better understanding of the origin of the hemodynamic signals, and what factors are governing their spatial control is necessary. Here, I will briefly describe the studies and developments that ultimately led to our successful effort in mapping orientation columns in humans that is considered by many as the current state-of-the-art for fMRI studies.
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abstractIn this short review article I will summarize the path we took over the years towards increasing the spatial resolution of fMRI. To fully capitalize on the fMRI technique, a better understanding of the origin of the hemodynamic signals, and what factors are governing their spatial control is necessary. Here, I will briefly describe the studies and developments that ultimately led to our successful effort in mapping orientation columns in humans that is considered by many as the current state-of-the-art for fMRI studies.
doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.01.018
pmid22245344
date2012-08-15