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Liposome-based delivery system for vaccine candidates: constructing an effective formulation

The discovery of liposomes in 1965 by Bangham and coworkers changed the prospects of drug delivery systems. Since then, the application of liposomes as vaccine delivery systems has been studied extensively. Liposomal vaccine delivery systems are made up of nano- or micro-sized vesicles consisting of... Full description

Journal Title: Nanomedicine (London England), December 2012, Vol.7(12), pp.1877-93
Main Author: Giddam, Ashwini Kumar
Other Authors: Giddam, Ashwin Kumar , Zaman, Mehfuz , Skwarczynski, Mariusz , Toth, Istvan
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1748-6963 ; PMID: 23249332 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.2217/nnm.12.157
Link: http://pubmed.gov/23249332
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recordid: medline23249332
title: Liposome-based delivery system for vaccine candidates: constructing an effective formulation
format: Article
creator:
  • Giddam, Ashwini Kumar
  • Giddam, Ashwin Kumar
  • Zaman, Mehfuz
  • Skwarczynski, Mariusz
  • Toth, Istvan
subjects:
  • Drug Delivery Systems
  • Liposomes -- Chemistry
  • Phospholipids -- Chemistry
  • Vaccines -- Administration & Dosage
ispartof: Nanomedicine (London, England), December 2012, Vol.7(12), pp.1877-93
description: The discovery of liposomes in 1965 by Bangham and coworkers changed the prospects of drug delivery systems. Since then, the application of liposomes as vaccine delivery systems has been studied extensively. Liposomal vaccine delivery systems are made up of nano- or micro-sized vesicles consisting of phospholipid bilayers, in which the bioactive molecule is encapsulated/entrapped, adsorbed or surface coupled. In general, liposomes are not immunogenic on their own; thus, liposomes combined with immunostimulating ligands (adjuvants) or various other formulations have been used as vaccine delivery systems. A thorough understanding of formulation parameters allows the design of effective liposomal vaccine delivery systems. This article provides an overview of various factors that influence liposomal immunogenicity. In particular, the effects of vesicle size, surface charge, bilayer composition, lamellarity, pegylation and targeting of liposomes are described.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1748-6963 ; PMID: 23249332 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.2217/nnm.12.157
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 17486963
  • 1748-6963
url: Link


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descriptionThe discovery of liposomes in 1965 by Bangham and coworkers changed the prospects of drug delivery systems. Since then, the application of liposomes as vaccine delivery systems has been studied extensively. Liposomal vaccine delivery systems are made up of nano- or micro-sized vesicles consisting of phospholipid bilayers, in which the bioactive molecule is encapsulated/entrapped, adsorbed or surface coupled. In general, liposomes are not immunogenic on their own; thus, liposomes combined with immunostimulating ligands (adjuvants) or various other formulations have been used as vaccine delivery systems. A thorough understanding of formulation parameters allows the design of effective liposomal vaccine delivery systems. This article provides an overview of various factors that influence liposomal immunogenicity. In particular, the effects of vesicle size, surface charge, bilayer composition, lamellarity, pegylation and targeting of liposomes are described.
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abstractThe discovery of liposomes in 1965 by Bangham and coworkers changed the prospects of drug delivery systems. Since then, the application of liposomes as vaccine delivery systems has been studied extensively. Liposomal vaccine delivery systems are made up of nano- or micro-sized vesicles consisting of phospholipid bilayers, in which the bioactive molecule is encapsulated/entrapped, adsorbed or surface coupled. In general, liposomes are not immunogenic on their own; thus, liposomes combined with immunostimulating ligands (adjuvants) or various other formulations have been used as vaccine delivery systems. A thorough understanding of formulation parameters allows the design of effective liposomal vaccine delivery systems. This article provides an overview of various factors that influence liposomal immunogenicity. In particular, the effects of vesicle size, surface charge, bilayer composition, lamellarity, pegylation and targeting of liposomes are described.
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