schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Ultrastable silver nanoparticles

Noble-metal nanoparticles have had a substantial impact across a diverse range of fields, including catalysis, sensing, photochemistry, optoelectronics, energy conversion and medicine. Although silver has very desirable physical properties, good relative abundance and low cost, gold nanoparticles ha... Full description

Journal Title: Nature 19 September 2013, Vol.501(7467), pp.399-402
Main Author: Desireddy, Anil
Other Authors: Conn, Brian E , Guo, Jingshu , Yoon, Bokwon , Barnett, Robert N , Monahan, Bradley M , Kirschbaum, Kristin , Griffith, Wendell P , Whetten, Robert L , Landman, Uzi , Bigioni, Terry P
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1476-4687 ; PMID: 24005327 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1038/nature12523
Link: http://pubmed.gov/24005327
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: medline24005327
title: Ultrastable silver nanoparticles
format: Article
creator:
  • Desireddy, Anil
  • Conn, Brian E
  • Guo, Jingshu
  • Yoon, Bokwon
  • Barnett, Robert N
  • Monahan, Bradley M
  • Kirschbaum, Kristin
  • Griffith, Wendell P
  • Whetten, Robert L
  • Landman, Uzi
  • Bigioni, Terry P
subjects:
  • Nanoparticles -- Properties
  • Nanoparticles -- Composition
  • Silver -- Atomic Properties
  • Silver -- Structure
  • Molecular Structure -- Research
ispartof: Nature, 19 September 2013, Vol.501(7467), pp.399-402
description: Noble-metal nanoparticles have had a substantial impact across a diverse range of fields, including catalysis, sensing, photochemistry, optoelectronics, energy conversion and medicine. Although silver has very desirable physical properties, good relative abundance and low cost, gold nanoparticles have been widely favoured owing to their proved stability and ease of use. Unlike gold, silver is notorious for its susceptibility to oxidation (tarnishing), which has limited the development of important silver-based nanomaterials. Despite two decades of synthetic efforts, silver nanoparticles that are inert or have long-term stability remain unrealized. Here we report a simple synthetic protocol for producing ultrastable silver nanoparticles, yielding a single-sized molecular product in very large quantities with quantitative yield and without the need for size sorting. The stability, purity and yield are substantially better than those for other metal nanoparticles, including gold, owing to an effective stabilization mechanism. The particular size and stoichiometry of the product were found to be insensitive to variations in synthesis parameters. The chemical stability and structural, electronic and optical properties can be understood using first-principles electronic structure theory based on an experimental single-crystal X-ray structure. Although several structures have been determined for protected gold nanoclusters, none has been reported so far for silver nanoparticles. The total structure of a thiolate-protected silver nanocluster reported here uncovers the unique structure of the silver thiolate protecting layer, consisting of Ag2S5 capping structures. The outstanding stability of the nanoparticle is attributed to a closed-shell 18-electron configuration with a large energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, an ultrastable 32-silver-atom excavated-dodecahedral core consisting of a hollow 12-silver-atom icosahedron encapsulated by a 20-silver-atom dodecahedron, and the choice of protective coordinating ligands. The straightforward synthesis of large quantities of pure molecular product promises to make this class of materials widely available for further research and technology development.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1476-4687 ; PMID: 24005327 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1038/nature12523
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14764687
  • 1476-4687
url: Link


@attributes
ID552244423
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid24005327
sourceidmedline
recordidTN_medline24005327
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid1434742897
galeid343532908
display
typearticle
titleUltrastable silver nanoparticles
creatorDesireddy, Anil ; Conn, Brian E ; Guo, Jingshu ; Yoon, Bokwon ; Barnett, Robert N ; Monahan, Bradley M ; Kirschbaum, Kristin ; Griffith, Wendell P ; Whetten, Robert L ; Landman, Uzi ; Bigioni, Terry P
ispartofNature, 19 September 2013, Vol.501(7467), pp.399-402
identifier
descriptionNoble-metal nanoparticles have had a substantial impact across a diverse range of fields, including catalysis, sensing, photochemistry, optoelectronics, energy conversion and medicine. Although silver has very desirable physical properties, good relative abundance and low cost, gold nanoparticles have been widely favoured owing to their proved stability and ease of use. Unlike gold, silver is notorious for its susceptibility to oxidation (tarnishing), which has limited the development of important silver-based nanomaterials. Despite two decades of synthetic efforts, silver nanoparticles that are inert or have long-term stability remain unrealized. Here we report a simple synthetic protocol for producing ultrastable silver nanoparticles, yielding a single-sized molecular product in very large quantities with quantitative yield and without the need for size sorting. The stability, purity and yield are substantially better than those for other metal nanoparticles, including gold, owing to an effective stabilization mechanism. The particular size and stoichiometry of the product were found to be insensitive to variations in synthesis parameters. The chemical stability and structural, electronic and optical properties can be understood using first-principles electronic structure theory based on an experimental single-crystal X-ray structure. Although several structures have been determined for protected gold nanoclusters, none has been reported so far for silver nanoparticles. The total structure of a thiolate-protected silver nanocluster reported here uncovers the unique structure of the silver thiolate protecting layer, consisting of Ag2S5 capping structures. The outstanding stability of the nanoparticle is attributed to a closed-shell 18-electron configuration with a large energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, an ultrastable 32-silver-atom excavated-dodecahedral core consisting of a hollow 12-silver-atom icosahedron encapsulated by a 20-silver-atom dodecahedron, and the choice of protective coordinating ligands. The straightforward synthesis of large quantities of pure molecular product promises to make this class of materials widely available for further research and technology development.
languageeng
source
subjectNanoparticles -- Properties ; Nanoparticles -- Composition ; Silver -- Atomic Properties ; Silver -- Structure ; Molecular Structure -- Research;
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://pubmed.gov/24005327$$EView_this_record_in_MEDLINE/PubMed
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutMedline.html$$EView_the_MEDLINE/PubMed_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Desireddy, Anil
1Conn, Brian E
2Guo, Jingshu
3Yoon, Bokwon
4Barnett, Robert N
5Monahan, Bradley M
6Kirschbaum, Kristin
7Griffith, Wendell P
8Whetten, Robert L
9Landman, Uzi
10Bigioni, Terry P
titleUltrastable silver nanoparticles
descriptionNoble-metal nanoparticles have had a substantial impact across a diverse range of fields, including catalysis, sensing, photochemistry, optoelectronics, energy conversion and medicine. Although silver has very desirable physical properties, good relative abundance and low cost, gold nanoparticles have been widely favoured owing to their proved stability and ease of use. Unlike gold, silver is notorious for its susceptibility to oxidation (tarnishing), which has limited the development of important silver-based nanomaterials. Despite two decades of synthetic efforts, silver nanoparticles that are inert or have long-term stability remain unrealized. Here we report a simple synthetic protocol for producing ultrastable silver nanoparticles, yielding a single-sized molecular product in very large quantities with quantitative yield and without the need for size sorting. The stability, purity and yield are substantially better than those for other metal nanoparticles, including gold, owing to an effective stabilization mechanism. The particular size and stoichiometry of the product were found to be insensitive to variations in synthesis parameters. The chemical stability and structural, electronic and optical properties can be understood using first-principles electronic structure theory based on an experimental single-crystal X-ray structure. Although several structures have been determined for protected gold nanoclusters, none has been reported so far for silver nanoparticles. The total structure of a thiolate-protected silver nanocluster reported here uncovers the unique structure of the silver thiolate protecting layer, consisting of Ag2S5 capping structures. The outstanding stability of the nanoparticle is attributed to a closed-shell 18-electron configuration with a large energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, an ultrastable 32-silver-atom excavated-dodecahedral core consisting of a hollow 12-silver-atom icosahedron encapsulated by a 20-silver-atom dodecahedron, and the choice of protective coordinating ligands. The straightforward synthesis of large quantities of pure molecular product promises to make this class of materials widely available for further research and technology development.
general
024005327
1English
2MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
310.1038/nature12523
4MEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
sourceidmedline
recordidmedline24005327
issn
014764687
11476-4687
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
addtitleNature
searchscope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
scope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
lsr4120130919
citationpf 399 vol 501 issue 7467
startdate20130919
enddate20130919
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[issn, subject, galeid, pqid]
sort
titleUltrastable silver nanoparticles
authorDesireddy, Anil ; Conn, Brian E ; Guo, Jingshu ; Yoon, Bokwon ; Barnett, Robert N ; Monahan, Bradley M ; Kirschbaum, Kristin ; Griffith, Wendell P ; Whetten, Robert L ; Landman, Uzi ; Bigioni, Terry P
creationdate20130919
lso0120130919
facets
frbrgroupid5694436369122153013
frbrtype5
newrecords20190701
languageeng
creationdate2013
collectionMEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Desireddy, Anil
1Conn, Brian E
2Guo, Jingshu
3Yoon, Bokwon
4Barnett, Robert N
5Monahan, Bradley M
6Kirschbaum, Kristin
7Griffith, Wendell P
8Whetten, Robert L
9Landman, Uzi
10Bigioni, Terry P
jtitleNature
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Desireddy
1Conn
2Guo
3Yoon
4Barnett
5Monahan
6Kirschbaum
7Griffith
8Whetten
9Landman
10Bigioni
aufirst
0Anil
1Brian E
2Jingshu
3Bokwon
4Robert N
5Bradley M
6Kristin
7Wendell P
8Robert L
9Uzi
10Terry P
au
0Desireddy, Anil
1Conn, Brian E
2Guo, Jingshu
3Yoon, Bokwon
4Barnett, Robert N
5Monahan, Bradley M
6Kirschbaum, Kristin
7Griffith, Wendell P
8Whetten, Robert L
9Landman, Uzi
10Bigioni, Terry P
atitleUltrastable silver nanoparticles
jtitleNature
risdate20130919
volume501
issue7467
spage399
pages399-402
eissn1476-4687
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractNoble-metal nanoparticles have had a substantial impact across a diverse range of fields, including catalysis, sensing, photochemistry, optoelectronics, energy conversion and medicine. Although silver has very desirable physical properties, good relative abundance and low cost, gold nanoparticles have been widely favoured owing to their proved stability and ease of use. Unlike gold, silver is notorious for its susceptibility to oxidation (tarnishing), which has limited the development of important silver-based nanomaterials. Despite two decades of synthetic efforts, silver nanoparticles that are inert or have long-term stability remain unrealized. Here we report a simple synthetic protocol for producing ultrastable silver nanoparticles, yielding a single-sized molecular product in very large quantities with quantitative yield and without the need for size sorting. The stability, purity and yield are substantially better than those for other metal nanoparticles, including gold, owing to an effective stabilization mechanism. The particular size and stoichiometry of the product were found to be insensitive to variations in synthesis parameters. The chemical stability and structural, electronic and optical properties can be understood using first-principles electronic structure theory based on an experimental single-crystal X-ray structure. Although several structures have been determined for protected gold nanoclusters, none has been reported so far for silver nanoparticles. The total structure of a thiolate-protected silver nanocluster reported here uncovers the unique structure of the silver thiolate protecting layer, consisting of Ag2S5 capping structures. The outstanding stability of the nanoparticle is attributed to a closed-shell 18-electron configuration with a large energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, an ultrastable 32-silver-atom excavated-dodecahedral core consisting of a hollow 12-silver-atom icosahedron encapsulated by a 20-silver-atom dodecahedron, and the choice of protective coordinating ligands. The straightforward synthesis of large quantities of pure molecular product promises to make this class of materials widely available for further research and technology development.
doi10.1038/nature12523
pmid24005327
issn00280836
oafree_for_read
date2013-09-19