schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Ribbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage

Noise exposure at low levels or low doses can damage hair cell afferent ribbon synapses without causing permanent threshold shifts. In contrast to reports in the mouse cochleae, initial damage to ribbon synapses in the cochleae of guinea pigs is largely repairable. In the present study, we further i... Full description

Journal Title: PloS one 2013, Vol.8(12), pp.e81566
Main Author: Shi, Lijuan
Other Authors: Liu, Lijie , He, Tingting , Guo, Xiaojing , Yu, Zhiping , Yin, Shankai , Wang, Jian
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 24349090 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0081566
Link: http://pubmed.gov/24349090
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: medline24349090
title: Ribbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage
format: Article
creator:
  • Shi, Lijuan
  • Liu, Lijie
  • He, Tingting
  • Guo, Xiaojing
  • Yu, Zhiping
  • Yin, Shankai
  • Wang, Jian
subjects:
  • Cochlea -- Physiopathology
  • Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner -- Pathology
  • Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced -- Physiopathology
  • Neuronal Plasticity -- Physiology
  • Synapses -- Pathology
ispartof: PloS one, 2013, Vol.8(12), pp.e81566
description: Noise exposure at low levels or low doses can damage hair cell afferent ribbon synapses without causing permanent threshold shifts. In contrast to reports in the mouse cochleae, initial damage to ribbon synapses in the cochleae of guinea pigs is largely repairable. In the present study, we further investigated the repair process in ribbon synapses in guinea pigs after similar noise exposure. In the control samples, a small portion of afferent synapses lacked synaptic ribbons, suggesting the co-existence of conventional no-ribbon and ribbon synapses. The loss and recovery of hair cell ribbons and post-synaptic densities (PSDs) occurred in parallel, but the recovery was not complete, resulting in a permanent loss of less than 10% synapses. During the repair process, ribbons were temporally separated from the PSDs. A plastic interaction between ribbons and postsynaptic terminals may be involved in the reestablishment of synaptic contact between ribbons and PSDs, as shown by location changes...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 24349090 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0081566
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19326203
  • 1932-6203
url: Link


@attributes
ID761872091
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid24349090
sourceidmedline
recordidTN_medline24349090
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid1469660048
galeid478358259
display
typearticle
titleRibbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage
creatorShi, Lijuan ; Liu, Lijie ; He, Tingting ; Guo, Xiaojing ; Yu, Zhiping ; Yin, Shankai ; Wang, Jian
ispartofPloS one, 2013, Vol.8(12), pp.e81566
identifier
subjectCochlea -- Physiopathology ; Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner -- Pathology ; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced -- Physiopathology ; Neuronal Plasticity -- Physiology ; Synapses -- Pathology
descriptionNoise exposure at low levels or low doses can damage hair cell afferent ribbon synapses without causing permanent threshold shifts. In contrast to reports in the mouse cochleae, initial damage to ribbon synapses in the cochleae of guinea pigs is largely repairable. In the present study, we further investigated the repair process in ribbon synapses in guinea pigs after similar noise exposure. In the control samples, a small portion of afferent synapses lacked synaptic ribbons, suggesting the co-existence of conventional no-ribbon and ribbon synapses. The loss and recovery of hair cell ribbons and post-synaptic densities (PSDs) occurred in parallel, but the recovery was not complete, resulting in a permanent loss of less than 10% synapses. During the repair process, ribbons were temporally separated from the PSDs. A plastic interaction between ribbons and postsynaptic terminals may be involved in the reestablishment of synaptic contact between ribbons and PSDs, as shown by location changes...
languageeng
source
version8
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://pubmed.gov/24349090$$EView_this_record_in_MEDLINE/PubMed
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutMedline.html$$EView_the_MEDLINE/PubMed_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Shi, Lijuan
1Liu, Lijie
2He, Tingting
3Guo, Xiaojing
4Yu, Zhiping
5Yin, Shankai
6Wang, Jian
titleRibbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage
descriptionNoise exposure at low levels or low doses can damage hair cell afferent ribbon synapses without causing permanent threshold shifts. In contrast to reports in the mouse cochleae, initial damage to ribbon synapses in the cochleae of guinea pigs is largely repairable. In the present study, we further investigated the repair process in ribbon synapses in guinea pigs after similar noise exposure. In the control samples, a small portion of afferent synapses lacked synaptic ribbons, suggesting the co-existence of conventional no-ribbon and ribbon synapses. The loss and recovery of hair cell ribbons and post-synaptic densities (PSDs) occurred in parallel, but the recovery was not complete, resulting in a permanent loss of less than 10% synapses. During the repair process, ribbons were temporally separated from the PSDs. A plastic interaction between ribbons and postsynaptic terminals may be involved in the reestablishment of synaptic contact between ribbons and PSDs, as shown by location changes...
subject
0Cochlea -- Physiopathology
1Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner -- Pathology
2Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced -- Physiopathology
3Neuronal Plasticity -- Physiology
4Synapses -- Pathology
general
024349090
1English
2MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
310.1371/journal.pone.0081566
4MEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
sourceidmedline
recordidmedline24349090
issn
019326203
11932-6203
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
addtitlePloS one
searchscope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
scope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
lsr412013
citationpf e81566 vol 8 issue 12
startdate20130101
enddate20131231
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[galeid, pqid]
sort
titleRibbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage
authorShi, Lijuan ; Liu, Lijie ; He, Tingting ; Guo, Xiaojing ; Yu, Zhiping ; Yin, Shankai ; Wang, Jian
creationdate20130000
lso0120130000
facets
frbrgroupid7224754000966704693
frbrtype5
newrecords20190701
languageeng
creationdate2013
topic
0Cochlea–Physiopathology
1Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner–Pathology
2Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced–Physiopathology
3Neuronal Plasticity–Physiology
4Synapses–Pathology
collectionMEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Shi, Lijuan
1Liu, Lijie
2He, Tingting
3Guo, Xiaojing
4Yu, Zhiping
5Yin, Shankai
6Wang, Jian
jtitlePlos One
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Shi
1Liu
2He
3Guo
4Yu
5Yin
6Wang
aufirst
0Lijuan
1Lijie
2Tingting
3Xiaojing
4Zhiping
5Shankai
6Jian
au
0Shi, Lijuan
1Liu, Lijie
2He, Tingting
3Guo, Xiaojing
4Yu, Zhiping
5Yin, Shankai
6Wang, Jian
atitleRibbon synapse plasticity in the cochleae of Guinea pigs after noise-induced silent damage
jtitlePloS one
date2013
risdate2013
volume8
issue12
spagee81566
pagese81566
issn1932-6203
eissn1932-6203
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractNoise exposure at low levels or low doses can damage hair cell afferent ribbon synapses without causing permanent threshold shifts. In contrast to reports in the mouse cochleae, initial damage to ribbon synapses in the cochleae of guinea pigs is largely repairable. In the present study, we further investigated the repair process in ribbon synapses in guinea pigs after similar noise exposure. In the control samples, a small portion of afferent synapses lacked synaptic ribbons, suggesting the co-existence of conventional no-ribbon and ribbon synapses. The loss and recovery of hair cell ribbons and post-synaptic densities (PSDs) occurred in parallel, but the recovery was not complete, resulting in a permanent loss of less than 10% synapses. During the repair process, ribbons were temporally separated from the PSDs. A plastic interaction between ribbons and postsynaptic terminals may be involved in the reestablishment of synaptic contact between ribbons and PSDs, as shown by location changes...
doi10.1371/journal.pone.0081566
pmid24349090