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Obesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study

Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposit... Full description

Journal Title: PloS one 2014, Vol.9(7), pp.e103246
Main Author: Martínez-González, Miguel A
Other Authors: García-Arellano, Ana , Toledo, Estefanía , Bes-Rastrollo, Maira , Bulló, Mónica , Corella, Dolores , Fito, Montserrat , Ros, Emilio , Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria , Rekondo, Javier , Gómez-Gracia, Enrique , Fiol
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 25072784 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103246
Link: http://pubmed.gov/25072784
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title: Obesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study
format: Article
creator:
  • Martínez-González, Miguel A
  • García-Arellano, Ana
  • Toledo, Estefanía
  • Bes-Rastrollo, Maira
  • Bulló, Mónica
  • Corella, Dolores
  • Fito, Montserrat
  • Ros, Emilio
  • Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria
  • Rekondo, Javier
  • Gómez-Gracia, Enrique
  • Fiol
subjects:
  • Cardiovascular Diseases -- Etiology
  • Obesity -- Complications
ispartof: PloS one, 2014, Vol.9(7), pp.e103246
description: Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78-1.34), 1.30 (0.97-1.75) and 1.55 (1.06-2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88-1.59), 1.02 (0.74-1.41) and 1.57 (1.19-2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 25072784 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103246
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19326203
  • 1932-6203
url: Link


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titleObesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study
creatorMartínez-González, Miguel A ; García-Arellano, Ana ; Toledo, Estefanía ; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira ; Bulló, Mónica ; Corella, Dolores ; Fito, Montserrat ; Ros, Emilio ; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria ; Rekondo, Javier ; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique ; Fiol
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subjectCardiovascular Diseases -- Etiology ; Obesity -- Complications
descriptionDifferent indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78-1.34), 1.30 (0.97-1.75) and 1.55 (1.06-2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88-1.59), 1.02 (0.74-1.41) and 1.57 (1.19-2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639.
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17Pintó, Xavier
18Estruch, Ramon
titleObesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study
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0Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality.
1We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009.
2After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78-1.34), 1.30 (0.97-1.75) and 1.55 (1.06-2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88-1.59), 1.02 (0.74-1.41) and 1.57 (1.19-2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial.
3Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality.
4Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639.
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titleObesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study
authorMartínez-González, Miguel A ; García-Arellano, Ana ; Toledo, Estefanía ; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira ; Bulló, Mónica ; Corella, Dolores ; Fito, Montserrat ; Ros, Emilio ; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria ; Rekondo, Javier ; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique ; Fiol
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atitleObesity indexes and total mortality among elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk: the PREDIMED study
jtitlePloS one
date2014
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abstractDifferent indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality.
doi10.1371/journal.pone.0103246
pmid25072784