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Relationship between living alone and food and nutrient intake

The increase in the number of individuals living alone has implications for nutrition and health outcomes. The aim of this review was to investigate whether there is a difference in food and nutrient intake between adults living alone and those living with others. Eight electronic databases were sea... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition reviews September 2015, Vol.73(9), pp.594-611
Main Author: Hanna, Katherine L
Other Authors: Collins, Peter F
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; PMID: 26269488 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuv024
Link: http://pubmed.gov/26269488
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recordid: medline26269488
title: Relationship between living alone and food and nutrient intake
format: Article
creator:
  • Hanna, Katherine L
  • Collins, Peter F
subjects:
  • Diet
  • Food Intake
  • Living Arrangements
  • Nutrient Intake
  • One-Person Household.
  • Diet
  • Family Characteristics
  • Feeding Behavior
ispartof: Nutrition reviews, September 2015, Vol.73(9), pp.594-611
description: The increase in the number of individuals living alone has implications for nutrition and health outcomes. The aim of this review was to investigate whether there is a difference in food and nutrient intake between adults living alone and those living with others. Eight electronic databases were searched, using terms related to living alone, nutrition, food, and socioeconomic factors. Forty-one papers met the inclusion criteria, and data of interest were extracted. Results varied but suggested that, compared with persons who do not live alone, persons who live alone have a lower diversity of food intake, a lower consumption of some core foods groups (fruits, vegetables, and fish), and a higher likelihood of having an unhealthy dietary pattern. Associations between living alone and nutrient intake were unclear. Men living alone were more often observed to be at greater risk of undesirable intakes than women. The findings of this review suggest that living alone could negatively affect some aspects of food intake and contribute to the relationship between living alone and poor health outcomes, although associations could vary among socioeconomic groups. Further research is required to help to elucidate these findings.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; PMID: 26269488 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuv024
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 17534887
  • 1753-4887
url: Link


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subjectDiet ; Food Intake ; Living Arrangements ; Nutrient Intake ; One-Person Household. ; Diet ; Family Characteristics ; Feeding Behavior
descriptionThe increase in the number of individuals living alone has implications for nutrition and health outcomes. The aim of this review was to investigate whether there is a difference in food and nutrient intake between adults living alone and those living with others. Eight electronic databases were searched, using terms related to living alone, nutrition, food, and socioeconomic factors. Forty-one papers met the inclusion criteria, and data of interest were extracted. Results varied but suggested that, compared with persons who do not live alone, persons who live alone have a lower diversity of food intake, a lower consumption of some core foods groups (fruits, vegetables, and fish), and a higher likelihood of having an unhealthy dietary pattern. Associations between living alone and nutrient intake were unclear. Men living alone were more often observed to be at greater risk of undesirable intakes than women. The findings of this review suggest that living alone could negatively affect some aspects of food intake and contribute to the relationship between living alone and poor health outcomes, although associations could vary among socioeconomic groups. Further research is required to help to elucidate these findings.
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abstractThe increase in the number of individuals living alone has implications for nutrition and health outcomes. The aim of this review was to investigate whether there is a difference in food and nutrient intake between adults living alone and those living with others. Eight electronic databases were searched, using terms related to living alone, nutrition, food, and socioeconomic factors. Forty-one papers met the inclusion criteria, and data of interest were extracted. Results varied but suggested that, compared with persons who do not live alone, persons who live alone have a lower diversity of food intake, a lower consumption of some core foods groups (fruits, vegetables, and fish), and a higher likelihood of having an unhealthy dietary pattern. Associations between living alone and nutrient intake were unclear. Men living alone were more often observed to be at greater risk of undesirable intakes than women. The findings of this review suggest that living alone could negatively affect some aspects of food intake and contribute to the relationship between living alone and poor health outcomes, although associations could vary among socioeconomic groups. Further research is required to help to elucidate these findings.
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