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Neural evidence that three dimensions organize mental state representation: Rationality, social impact, and valence

How do people understand the minds of others? Existing psychological theories have suggested a number of dimensions that perceivers could use to make sense of others' internal mental states. However, it remains unclear which of these dimensions, if any, the brain spontaneously uses when we think abo... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 05 January 2016, Vol.113(1), pp.194-9
Main Author: Tamir, Diana I
Other Authors: Thornton, Mark A , Contreras, Juan Manuel , Mitchell, Jason P
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; PMID: 26621704 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1511905112
Link: http://pubmed.gov/26621704
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recordid: medline26621704
title: Neural evidence that three dimensions organize mental state representation: Rationality, social impact, and valence
format: Article
creator:
  • Tamir, Diana I
  • Thornton, Mark A
  • Contreras, Juan Manuel
  • Mitchell, Jason P
subjects:
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Mentalizing
  • Multivoxel Pattern Analysis
  • Social Cognition
  • Theory of Mind
  • Psychological Theory
  • Social Perception
  • Comprehension -- Physiology
  • Thinking -- Physiology
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 05 January 2016, Vol.113(1), pp.194-9
description: How do people understand the minds of others? Existing psychological theories have suggested a number of dimensions that perceivers could use to make sense of others' internal mental states. However, it remains unclear which of these dimensions, if any, the brain spontaneously uses when we think about others. The present study used multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of neuroimaging data to identify the primary organizing principles of social cognition. We derived four unique dimensions of mental state representation from existing psychological theories and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test whether these dimensions organize the neural encoding of others' mental states. MVPA revealed that three such dimensions could predict neural patterns within the medial prefrontal and parietal cortices, temporoparietal junction, and anterior temporal lobes during social thought: rationality, social impact, and valence. These results suggest that these dimensions serve as organizing principles...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; PMID: 26621704 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1511905112
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 10916490
  • 1091-6490
url: Link


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titleNeural evidence that three dimensions organize mental state representation: Rationality, social impact, and valence
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subjectFunctional Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Mentalizing ; Multivoxel Pattern Analysis ; Social Cognition ; Theory of Mind ; Psychological Theory ; Social Perception ; Comprehension -- Physiology ; Thinking -- Physiology
descriptionHow do people understand the minds of others? Existing psychological theories have suggested a number of dimensions that perceivers could use to make sense of others' internal mental states. However, it remains unclear which of these dimensions, if any, the brain spontaneously uses when we think about others. The present study used multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of neuroimaging data to identify the primary organizing principles of social cognition. We derived four unique dimensions of mental state representation from existing psychological theories and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test whether these dimensions organize the neural encoding of others' mental states. MVPA revealed that three such dimensions could predict neural patterns within the medial prefrontal and parietal cortices, temporoparietal junction, and anterior temporal lobes during social thought: rationality, social impact, and valence. These results suggest that these dimensions serve as organizing principles...
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abstractHow do people understand the minds of others? Existing psychological theories have suggested a number of dimensions that perceivers could use to make sense of others' internal mental states. However, it remains unclear which of these dimensions, if any, the brain spontaneously uses when we think about others. The present study used multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of neuroimaging data to identify the primary organizing principles of social cognition. We derived four unique dimensions of mental state representation from existing psychological theories and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test whether these dimensions organize the neural encoding of others' mental states. MVPA revealed that three such dimensions could predict neural patterns within the medial prefrontal and parietal cortices, temporoparietal junction, and anterior temporal lobes during social thought: rationality, social impact, and valence. These results suggest that these dimensions serve as organizing principles...
doi10.1073/pnas.1511905112
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date2016-01-05