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Living with sickle cell disease and depression in Lagos, Nigeria: A mixed methods study

Sickle cell disorders (SCD) and depression are both chronic illnesses of global significance. Past research on SCD and depression struggles to make sense of statistical associations, essentializes depression within the person with SCD, and treats stigma as an automatic correlate of chronic illness.... Full description

Journal Title: Social science & medicine (1982) July 2016, Vol.161, pp.27-36
Main Author: Ola, Bolanle A
Other Authors: Yates, Scott J , Dyson, Simon M
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1873-5347 ; PMID: 27239705 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.05.029
Link: http://pubmed.gov/27239705
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recordid: medline27239705
title: Living with sickle cell disease and depression in Lagos, Nigeria: A mixed methods study
format: Article
creator:
  • Ola, Bolanle A
  • Yates, Scott J
  • Dyson, Simon M
subjects:
  • Chronic Illness
  • Depression
  • Disability Rights
  • Mixed Methods
  • Nigeria
  • Sickle Cell
  • Stigma
  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Anemia, Sickle Cell -- Psychology
  • Depression -- Psychology
ispartof: Social science & medicine (1982), July 2016, Vol.161, pp.27-36
description: Sickle cell disorders (SCD) and depression are both chronic illnesses of global significance. Past research on SCD and depression struggles to make sense of statistical associations, essentializes depression within the person with SCD, and treats stigma as an automatic correlate of chronic illness. A mixed methods study (March 2012-April 2014) was undertaken with people living with SCD and depression in Lagos, Nigeria, examining depression-as disease (questionnaires); depression-as-illness-experience (individual depth interviews), and depression-as-societal-sickness (focus groups). 103 people with SCD attending an outpatients clinic were administered the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and 82 self-identified with some level of depression. Fifteen were subsequently interviewed about their illness experience. Their lives were characterized by being extensively subjected to vicious discriminatory remarks, including from significant others, negative experiences they felt contributed to their...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1873-5347 ; PMID: 27239705 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.05.029
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 18735347
  • 1873-5347
url: Link


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descriptionSickle cell disorders (SCD) and depression are both chronic illnesses of global significance. Past research on SCD and depression struggles to make sense of statistical associations, essentializes depression within the person with SCD, and treats stigma as an automatic correlate of chronic illness. A mixed methods study (March 2012-April 2014) was undertaken with people living with SCD and depression in Lagos, Nigeria, examining depression-as disease (questionnaires); depression-as-illness-experience (individual depth interviews), and depression-as-societal-sickness (focus groups). 103 people with SCD attending an outpatients clinic were administered the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and 82 self-identified with some level of depression. Fifteen were subsequently interviewed about their illness experience. Their lives were characterized by being extensively subjected to vicious discriminatory remarks, including from significant others, negative experiences they felt contributed to their...
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abstractSickle cell disorders (SCD) and depression are both chronic illnesses of global significance. Past research on SCD and depression struggles to make sense of statistical associations, essentializes depression within the person with SCD, and treats stigma as an automatic correlate of chronic illness. A mixed methods study (March 2012-April 2014) was undertaken with people living with SCD and depression in Lagos, Nigeria, examining depression-as disease (questionnaires); depression-as-illness-experience (individual depth interviews), and depression-as-societal-sickness (focus groups). 103 people with SCD attending an outpatients clinic were administered the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and 82 self-identified with some level of depression. Fifteen were subsequently interviewed about their illness experience. Their lives were characterized by being extensively subjected to vicious discriminatory remarks, including from significant others, negative experiences they felt contributed to their...
doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.05.029
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