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Foods, obesity, and diabetes-are all calories created equal?

Diet has become one of the top risk factors for poor health. The incidence of cardiometabolic disease in the United Sates, in Mexico, and in most countries is driven fundamentally by changes in diet quality. Weight gain has been typically framed as a problem of excess caloric intake, but, as reviewe... Full description

Journal Title: Nutrition reviews January 2017, Vol.75(suppl 1), pp.19-31
Main Author: Mozaffarian, Dariush
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; PMID: 28049747 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuw024
Link: http://pubmed.gov/28049747
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recordid: medline28049747
title: Foods, obesity, and diabetes-are all calories created equal?
format: Article
creator:
  • Mozaffarian, Dariush
subjects:
  • Cardiometabolic Risk
  • Diet Quality
  • Obesity
  • Weight Change
  • Diet
  • Cardiovascular Diseases -- Epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus -- Epidemiology
  • Metabolic Syndrome -- Epidemiology
  • Obesity -- Epidemiology
ispartof: Nutrition reviews, January 2017, Vol.75(suppl 1), pp.19-31
description: Diet has become one of the top risk factors for poor health. The incidence of cardiometabolic disease in the United Sates, in Mexico, and in most countries is driven fundamentally by changes in diet quality. Weight gain has been typically framed as a problem of excess caloric intake, but, as reviewed in this paper, subtle changes in the quality of diet are associated with long-term weight gain. In order to successfully address obesity and diabetes, researchers and policy makers have to better understand how weight gain in the long term is modulated and to change the focus of research and public policy from one based on counting calories to one based on diet quality and its determinants at various levels.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1753-4887 ; PMID: 28049747 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1093/nutrit/nuw024
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 17534887
  • 1753-4887
url: Link


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descriptionDiet has become one of the top risk factors for poor health. The incidence of cardiometabolic disease in the United Sates, in Mexico, and in most countries is driven fundamentally by changes in diet quality. Weight gain has been typically framed as a problem of excess caloric intake, but, as reviewed in this paper, subtle changes in the quality of diet are associated with long-term weight gain. In order to successfully address obesity and diabetes, researchers and policy makers have to better understand how weight gain in the long term is modulated and to change the focus of research and public policy from one based on counting calories to one based on diet quality and its determinants at various levels.
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abstractDiet has become one of the top risk factors for poor health. The incidence of cardiometabolic disease in the United Sates, in Mexico, and in most countries is driven fundamentally by changes in diet quality. Weight gain has been typically framed as a problem of excess caloric intake, but, as reviewed in this paper, subtle changes in the quality of diet are associated with long-term weight gain. In order to successfully address obesity and diabetes, researchers and policy makers have to better understand how weight gain in the long term is modulated and to change the focus of research and public policy from one based on counting calories to one based on diet quality and its determinants at various levels.
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