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Plant diversity enhances productivity and soil carbon storage

Despite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 fo... Full description

Journal Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 17 April 2018, Vol.115(16), pp.4027-4032
Main Author: Chen, Shiping
Other Authors: Wang, Wantong , Xu, Wenting , Wang, Yang , Wan, Hongwei , Chen, Dima , Tang, Zhiyao , Tang, Xuli , Zhou, Guoyi , Xie, Zongqiang , Zhou, Daowei , Shangguan, Zhouping , Huang, Jianhui , He, Jin-Sheng , Wang, Yanfen , Sheng, Jiandong , Tang, Lisong , Li, Xinrong , Dong, Ming , Wu, Yan , Wang, Qiufeng , Wang, Zhiheng , Wu, Jianguo , Chapin, F Stuart , Bai, Yongfei
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; PMID: 29666315 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1700298114
Link: http://pubmed.gov/29666315
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recordid: medline29666315
title: Plant diversity enhances productivity and soil carbon storage
format: Article
creator:
  • Chen, Shiping
  • Wang, Wantong
  • Xu, Wenting
  • Wang, Yang
  • Wan, Hongwei
  • Chen, Dima
  • Tang, Zhiyao
  • Tang, Xuli
  • Zhou, Guoyi
  • Xie, Zongqiang
  • Zhou, Daowei
  • Shangguan, Zhouping
  • Huang, Jianhui
  • He, Jin-Sheng
  • Wang, Yanfen
  • Sheng, Jiandong
  • Tang, Lisong
  • Li, Xinrong
  • Dong, Ming
  • Wu, Yan
  • Wang, Qiufeng
  • Wang, Zhiheng
  • Wu, Jianguo
  • Chapin, F Stuart
  • Bai, Yongfei
subjects:
  • Aboveground Net Primary Productivity
  • Belowground Biomass
  • Human Disturbance
  • Soil Carbon Storage
  • Species Richness
  • Biodiversity
  • Carbon Sequestration
  • Ecosystem
  • Carbon -- Analysis
  • Plants -- Metabolism
  • Soil -- Chemistry
ispartof: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 17 April 2018, Vol.115(16), pp.4027-4032
description: Despite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 forest, shrubland, and grassland sites across China and predictions from an integrative model combining multiple theories, we systematically examined the direct effects of climate, soils, and human impacts on SOC storage versus the indirect effects mediated by species richness (SR), aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and belowground biomass (BB). We found that favorable climates (high temperature and precipitation) had a consistent negative effect on SOC storage in forests and shrublands, but not in grasslands. Climate favorability, particularly high precipitation, was associated with both higher SR and higher BB, which had consistent positive effects on SOC storage, thus offsetting the direct negative effect of favorable climate on SOC. The indirect effects of climate on SOC storage depended on the relationships of SR with ANPP and BB, which were consistently positive in all biome types. In addition, human disturbance and soil pH had both direct and indirect effects on SOC storage, with the indirect effects mediated by changes in SR, ANPP, and BB. High soil pH had a consistently negative effect on SOC storage. Our findings have important implications for improving global carbon cycling models and ecosystem management: Maintaining high levels of diversity can enhance soil carbon sequestration and help sustain the benefits of plant diversity and productivity.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1091-6490 ; PMID: 29666315 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1700298114
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 10916490
  • 1091-6490
url: Link


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titlePlant diversity enhances productivity and soil carbon storage
creatorChen, Shiping ; Wang, Wantong ; Xu, Wenting ; Wang, Yang ; Wan, Hongwei ; Chen, Dima ; Tang, Zhiyao ; Tang, Xuli ; Zhou, Guoyi ; Xie, Zongqiang ; Zhou, Daowei ; Shangguan, Zhouping ; Huang, Jianhui ; He, Jin-Sheng ; Wang, Yanfen ; Sheng, Jiandong ; Tang, Lisong ; Li, Xinrong ; Dong, Ming ; Wu, Yan ; Wang, Qiufeng ; Wang, Zhiheng ; Wu, Jianguo ; Chapin, F Stuart ; Bai, Yongfei
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subjectAboveground Net Primary Productivity ; Belowground Biomass ; Human Disturbance ; Soil Carbon Storage ; Species Richness ; Biodiversity ; Carbon Sequestration ; Ecosystem ; Carbon -- Analysis ; Plants -- Metabolism ; Soil -- Chemistry
descriptionDespite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 forest, shrubland, and grassland sites across China and predictions from an integrative model combining multiple theories, we systematically examined the direct effects of climate, soils, and human impacts on SOC storage versus the indirect effects mediated by species richness (SR), aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and belowground biomass (BB). We found that favorable climates (high temperature and precipitation) had a consistent negative effect on SOC storage in forests and shrublands, but not in grasslands. Climate favorability, particularly high precipitation, was associated with both higher SR and higher BB, which had consistent positive effects on SOC storage, thus offsetting the direct negative effect of favorable climate on SOC. The indirect effects of climate on SOC storage depended on the relationships of SR with ANPP and BB, which were consistently positive in all biome types. In addition, human disturbance and soil pH had both direct and indirect effects on SOC storage, with the indirect effects mediated by changes in SR, ANPP, and BB. High soil pH had a consistently negative effect on SOC storage. Our findings have important implications for improving global carbon cycling models and ecosystem management: Maintaining high levels of diversity can enhance soil carbon sequestration and help sustain the benefits of plant diversity and productivity.
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titlePlant diversity enhances productivity and soil carbon storage
descriptionDespite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 forest, shrubland, and grassland sites across China and predictions from an integrative model combining multiple theories, we systematically examined the direct effects of climate, soils, and human impacts on SOC storage versus the indirect effects mediated by species richness (SR), aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and belowground biomass (BB). We found that favorable climates (high temperature and precipitation) had a consistent negative effect on SOC storage in forests and shrublands, but not in grasslands. Climate favorability, particularly high precipitation, was associated with both higher SR and higher BB, which had consistent positive effects on SOC storage, thus offsetting the direct negative effect of favorable climate on SOC. The indirect effects of climate on SOC storage depended on the relationships of SR with ANPP and BB, which were consistently positive in all biome types. In addition, human disturbance and soil pH had both direct and indirect effects on SOC storage, with the indirect effects mediated by changes in SR, ANPP, and BB. High soil pH had a consistently negative effect on SOC storage. Our findings have important implications for improving global carbon cycling models and ecosystem management: Maintaining high levels of diversity can enhance soil carbon sequestration and help sustain the benefits of plant diversity and productivity.
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abstractDespite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 forest, shrubland, and grassland sites across China and predictions from an integrative model combining multiple theories, we systematically examined the direct effects of climate, soils, and human impacts on SOC storage versus the indirect effects mediated by species richness (SR), aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and belowground biomass (BB). We found that favorable climates (high temperature and precipitation) had a consistent negative effect on SOC storage in forests and shrublands, but not in grasslands. Climate favorability, particularly high precipitation, was associated with both higher SR and higher BB, which had consistent positive effects on SOC storage, thus offsetting the direct negative effect of favorable climate on SOC. The indirect effects of climate on SOC storage depended on the relationships of SR with ANPP and BB, which were consistently positive in all biome types. In addition, human disturbance and soil pH had both direct and indirect effects on SOC storage, with the indirect effects mediated by changes in SR, ANPP, and BB. High soil pH had a consistently negative effect on SOC storage. Our findings have important implications for improving global carbon cycling models and ecosystem management: Maintaining high levels of diversity can enhance soil carbon sequestration and help sustain the benefits of plant diversity and productivity.
doi10.1073/pnas.1700298114
pmid29666315
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date2018-04-17