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Mapping Frequency-Specific Tone Predictions in the Human Auditory Cortex at High Spatial Resolution

Auditory inputs reaching our ears are often incomplete, but our brains nevertheless transform them into rich and complete perceptual phenomena such as meaningful conversations or pleasurable music. It has been hypothesized that our brains extract regularities in inputs, which enables us to predict t... Full description

Journal Title: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience 23 May 2018, Vol.38(21), pp.4934-4942
Main Author: Berlot, Eva
Other Authors: Formisano, Elia , De Martino, Federico
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1529-2401 ; PMID: 29712781 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2205-17.2018
Link: http://pubmed.gov/29712781
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recordid: medline29712781
title: Mapping Frequency-Specific Tone Predictions in the Human Auditory Cortex at High Spatial Resolution
format: Article
creator:
  • Berlot, Eva
  • Formisano, Elia
  • De Martino, Federico
subjects:
  • Auditory Cortex
  • Fmri
  • Predictions
  • Predictive Processing
  • Auditory Cortex -- Physiology
  • Pitch Perception -- Physiology
ispartof: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 23 May 2018, Vol.38(21), pp.4934-4942
description: Auditory inputs reaching our ears are often incomplete, but our brains nevertheless transform them into rich and complete perceptual phenomena such as meaningful conversations or pleasurable music. It has been hypothesized that our brains extract regularities in inputs, which enables us to predict the upcoming stimuli, leading to efficient sensory processing. However, it is unclear whether tone predictions are encoded with similar specificity as perceived signals. Here, we used high-field fMRI to investigate whether human auditory regions encode one of the most defining characteristics of auditory perception: the frequency of predicted tones. Two pairs of tone sequences were presented in ascending or descending directions, with the last tone omitted in half of the trials. Every pair of incomplete sequences contained identical sounds, but was associated with different expectations about the last tone (a high- or low-frequency target). This allowed us to disambiguate predictive signaling...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1529-2401 ; PMID: 29712781 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2205-17.2018
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15292401
  • 1529-2401
url: Link


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descriptionAuditory inputs reaching our ears are often incomplete, but our brains nevertheless transform them into rich and complete perceptual phenomena such as meaningful conversations or pleasurable music. It has been hypothesized that our brains extract regularities in inputs, which enables us to predict the upcoming stimuli, leading to efficient sensory processing. However, it is unclear whether tone predictions are encoded with similar specificity as perceived signals. Here, we used high-field fMRI to investigate whether human auditory regions encode one of the most defining characteristics of auditory perception: the frequency of predicted tones. Two pairs of tone sequences were presented in ascending or descending directions, with the last tone omitted in half of the trials. Every pair of incomplete sequences contained identical sounds, but was associated with different expectations about the last tone (a high- or low-frequency target). This allowed us to disambiguate predictive signaling...
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abstractAuditory inputs reaching our ears are often incomplete, but our brains nevertheless transform them into rich and complete perceptual phenomena such as meaningful conversations or pleasurable music. It has been hypothesized that our brains extract regularities in inputs, which enables us to predict the upcoming stimuli, leading to efficient sensory processing. However, it is unclear whether tone predictions are encoded with similar specificity as perceived signals. Here, we used high-field fMRI to investigate whether human auditory regions encode one of the most defining characteristics of auditory perception: the frequency of predicted tones. Two pairs of tone sequences were presented in ascending or descending directions, with the last tone omitted in half of the trials. Every pair of incomplete sequences contained identical sounds, but was associated with different expectations about the last tone (a high- or low-frequency target). This allowed us to disambiguate predictive signaling...
doi10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2205-17.2018
pmid29712781
date2018-05-23