schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Assessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations

Due to issues with establishment and persistence of natural enemies in biological control, the provision of alternative food sources and oviposition sites are important factors to enhance pest control. In this study, three different supplementation treatments were examined for their ability to incre... Full description

Journal Title: Scientific reports 15 August 2018, Vol.8(1), pp.12189
Main Author: Lee, Ming Hui
Other Authors: Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 2045-2322 ; PMID: 30111848 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-30018-3
Link: http://pubmed.gov/30111848
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: medline30111848
title: Assessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations
format: Article
creator:
  • Lee, Ming Hui
  • Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
subjects:
  • Biology
ispartof: Scientific reports, 15 August 2018, Vol.8(1), pp.12189
description: Due to issues with establishment and persistence of natural enemies in biological control, the provision of alternative food sources and oviposition sites are important factors to enhance pest control. In this study, three different supplementation treatments were examined for their ability to increase the populations of the predatory mite Amblydromalus limonicus, and its implications for greenhouse whitefly control on peppers and eggplants. These were: (1) pollen (Typha orientalis), (2) pollen and thread, (3) pollen, thread, and a substrate mixture of buckwheat, gorse, and rice husks, which were compared to a control treatment that had no supplementation. Significant treatment effects were found on pepper for A. limonicus (mite eggs p = 0.008, mobile mites p = 
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 2045-2322 ; PMID: 30111848 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-30018-3
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 20452322
  • 2045-2322
url: Link


@attributes
ID1766813407
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid30111848
sourceidmedline
recordidTN_medline30111848
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid2088919212
display
typearticle
titleAssessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations
creatorLee, Ming Hui ; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
ispartofScientific reports, 15 August 2018, Vol.8(1), pp.12189
identifier
descriptionDue to issues with establishment and persistence of natural enemies in biological control, the provision of alternative food sources and oviposition sites are important factors to enhance pest control. In this study, three different supplementation treatments were examined for their ability to increase the populations of the predatory mite Amblydromalus limonicus, and its implications for greenhouse whitefly control on peppers and eggplants. These were: (1) pollen (Typha orientalis), (2) pollen and thread, (3) pollen, thread, and a substrate mixture of buckwheat, gorse, and rice husks, which were compared to a control treatment that had no supplementation. Significant treatment effects were found on pepper for A. limonicus (mite eggs p = 0.008, mobile mites p = <0.0001). The predatory mite successfully established and persisted at high population levels in the pollen-thread, and pollen-thread-substrate treatments. All supplementation treatments were able to control whitefly populations on peppers, while the control treatment failed to. The results obtained were formulated into possible application techniques for greenhouse growers to utilise.
languageeng
source
subjectBiology;
version5
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://pubmed.gov/30111848$$EView_this_record_in_MEDLINE/PubMed
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutMedline.html$$EView_the_MEDLINE/PubMed_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Lee, Ming Hui
1Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
titleAssessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations
descriptionDue to issues with establishment and persistence of natural enemies in biological control, the provision of alternative food sources and oviposition sites are important factors to enhance pest control. In this study, three different supplementation treatments were examined for their ability to increase the populations of the predatory mite Amblydromalus limonicus, and its implications for greenhouse whitefly control on peppers and eggplants. These were: (1) pollen (Typha orientalis), (2) pollen and thread, (3) pollen, thread, and a substrate mixture of buckwheat, gorse, and rice husks, which were compared to a control treatment that had no supplementation. Significant treatment effects were found on pepper for A. limonicus (mite eggs p = 0.008, mobile mites p = <0.0001). The predatory mite successfully established and persisted at high population levels in the pollen-thread, and pollen-thread-substrate treatments. All supplementation treatments were able to control whitefly populations on peppers, while the control treatment failed to. The results obtained were formulated into possible application techniques for greenhouse growers to utilise.
general
030111848
1English
2MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
310.1038/s41598-018-30018-3
4MEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
sourceidmedline
recordidmedline30111848
issn
020452322
12045-2322
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2018
addtitleScientific reports
searchscope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
scope
0medline
1nlm_medline
2MEDLINE
lsr41201815
citationpf 12189 vol 8 issue 1
startdate20180815
enddate20180815
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[orcidid, issn, subject, pqid]
sort
titleAssessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations
authorLee, Ming Hui ; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
creationdate20180815
lso0120180815
facets
frbrgroupid7500424435986059667
frbrtype5
newrecords20190701
languageeng
creationdate2018
collectionMEDLINE/PubMed (NLM)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Lee, Ming Hui
1Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
jtitleScientific Reports
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Lee
1Zhang
aufirst
0Ming Hui
1Zhi-Qiang
au
0Lee, Ming Hui
1Zhang, Zhi-Qiang
atitleAssessing the augmentation of Amblydromalus limonicus with the supplementation of pollen, thread, and substrates to combat greenhouse whitefly populations
jtitleScientific reports
risdate20180815
volume8
issue1
spage12189
pages12189
eissn2045-2322
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractDue to issues with establishment and persistence of natural enemies in biological control, the provision of alternative food sources and oviposition sites are important factors to enhance pest control. In this study, three different supplementation treatments were examined for their ability to increase the populations of the predatory mite Amblydromalus limonicus, and its implications for greenhouse whitefly control on peppers and eggplants. These were: (1) pollen (Typha orientalis), (2) pollen and thread, (3) pollen, thread, and a substrate mixture of buckwheat, gorse, and rice husks, which were compared to a control treatment that had no supplementation. Significant treatment effects were found on pepper for A. limonicus (mite eggs p = 0.008, mobile mites p = <0.0001). The predatory mite successfully established and persisted at high population levels in the pollen-thread, and pollen-thread-substrate treatments. All supplementation treatments were able to control whitefly populations on peppers, while the control treatment failed to. The results obtained were formulated into possible application techniques for greenhouse growers to utilise.
doi10.1038/s41598-018-30018-3
pmid30111848
orcidid0000-0003-4172-0592
issnScientific Reports
oafree_for_read
date2018-08-15