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Barriers to bystander CPR in deprived communities: Findings from a qualitative study

Rates of out of hospital cardiac arrest are higher in deprived communities. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) can double the chance of survival but occurs less often in these communities in comparison to more affluent communities. People living in deprived communities are, therefore, do... Full description

Journal Title: PloS one 2020, Vol.15(6), pp.e0233675
Main Author: Dobbie, Fiona
Other Authors: Uny, Isa , Eadie, Douglas , Duncan, Edward , Stead, Martine , Bauld, Linda , Angus, Kathryn , Hassled, Liz , Macinnes, Lisa , Clegg, Gareth
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 32520938 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0233675
Link: http://pubmed.gov/32520938
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title: Barriers to bystander CPR in deprived communities: Findings from a qualitative study
format: Article
creator:
  • Dobbie, Fiona
  • Uny, Isa
  • Eadie, Douglas
  • Duncan, Edward
  • Stead, Martine
  • Bauld, Linda
  • Angus, Kathryn
  • Hassled, Liz
  • Macinnes, Lisa
  • Clegg, Gareth
subjects:
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation -- Psychology
  • First Aid -- Psychology
  • Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest -- Therapy
  • Vulnerable Populations -- Psychology
ispartof: PloS one, 2020, Vol.15(6), pp.e0233675
description: Rates of out of hospital cardiac arrest are higher in deprived communities. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) can double the chance of survival but occurs less often in these communities in comparison to more affluent communities. People living in deprived communities are, therefore, doubly disadvantaged and there is limited evidence to explain why BCPR rates are lower. The aim of this paper is to examine the barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities. Mixed method qualitative study with ten single sex focus groups (n = 61) conducted in deprived communities across central Scotland and 18 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders from the UK, Europe and the USA. Two key themes related to confidence and environmental factors were identified to summarise the perceived barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities. Barriers related to confidence included: self-efficacy; knowledge and awareness of how, and when, to administer CPR; accessing CPR training; having previous experience of administering BCPR; who required CPR; and whether the bystander was physically fit to give CPR. Environmental barriers focused on the safety of the physical environment in which people lived, and fear of reprisal from gangs or the police. Barriers to administering BCPR identified in the general population are relevant to people living in deprived communities but are exacerbated by a range of contextual, individual and environmental factors. A one-size-fits-all approach is not sufficient to promote 'CPR readiness' in deprived communities. Future approaches to working with disadvantaged communities should be tailored to the local community.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; PMID: 32520938 Version:1 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0233675
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19326203
  • 1932-6203
url: Link


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titleBarriers to bystander CPR in deprived communities: Findings from a qualitative study
creatorDobbie, Fiona ; Uny, Isa ; Eadie, Douglas ; Duncan, Edward ; Stead, Martine ; Bauld, Linda ; Angus, Kathryn ; Hassled, Liz ; Macinnes, Lisa ; Clegg, Gareth
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subjectCardiopulmonary Resuscitation -- Psychology ; First Aid -- Psychology ; Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest -- Therapy ; Vulnerable Populations -- Psychology
descriptionRates of out of hospital cardiac arrest are higher in deprived communities. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) can double the chance of survival but occurs less often in these communities in comparison to more affluent communities. People living in deprived communities are, therefore, doubly disadvantaged and there is limited evidence to explain why BCPR rates are lower. The aim of this paper is to examine the barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities. Mixed method qualitative study with ten single sex focus groups (n = 61) conducted in deprived communities across central Scotland and 18 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders from the UK, Europe and the USA. Two key themes related to confidence and environmental factors were identified to summarise the perceived barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities. Barriers related to confidence included: self-efficacy; knowledge and awareness of how, and when, to administer CPR; accessing CPR training; having previous experience of administering BCPR; who required CPR; and whether the bystander was physically fit to give CPR. Environmental barriers focused on the safety of the physical environment in which people lived, and fear of reprisal from gangs or the police. Barriers to administering BCPR identified in the general population are relevant to people living in deprived communities but are exacerbated by a range of contextual, individual and environmental factors. A one-size-fits-all approach is not sufficient to promote 'CPR readiness' in deprived communities. Future approaches to working with disadvantaged communities should be tailored to the local community.
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titleBarriers to bystander CPR in deprived communities: Findings from a qualitative study
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0Rates of out of hospital cardiac arrest are higher in deprived communities. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) can double the chance of survival but occurs less often in these communities in comparison to more affluent communities. People living in deprived communities are, therefore, doubly disadvantaged and there is limited evidence to explain why BCPR rates are lower. The aim of this paper is to examine the barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities.
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2Two key themes related to confidence and environmental factors were identified to summarise the perceived barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities. Barriers related to confidence included: self-efficacy; knowledge and awareness of how, and when, to administer CPR; accessing CPR training; having previous experience of administering BCPR; who required CPR; and whether the bystander was physically fit to give CPR. Environmental barriers focused on the safety of the physical environment in which people lived, and fear of reprisal from gangs or the police.
3Barriers to administering BCPR identified in the general population are relevant to people living in deprived communities but are exacerbated by a range of contextual, individual and environmental factors. A one-size-fits-all approach is not sufficient to promote 'CPR readiness' in deprived communities. Future approaches to working with disadvantaged communities should be tailored to the local community.
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abstractRates of out of hospital cardiac arrest are higher in deprived communities. Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (BCPR) can double the chance of survival but occurs less often in these communities in comparison to more affluent communities. People living in deprived communities are, therefore, doubly disadvantaged and there is limited evidence to explain why BCPR rates are lower. The aim of this paper is to examine the barriers to administering BCPR in deprived communities.
doi10.1371/journal.pone.0233675
pmid32520938