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Stroking or Buzzing?: A Comparison of Somatosensory Touch Stimuli Using 7 Tesla fMRI

Studying body representations in the brain helps us to understand how we humans relate to our own bodies. The in vivo mapping of the somatosensory cortex, where these representations are found, is greatly facilitated by the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to brain activation available a... Full description

Journal Title: PLoS One 2015, Vol.10(8), pp.urn:issn:1932-6203
Main Author: Van der Zwaag, W.
Other Authors: Gruetter, Rolf , Martuzzi, Roberto
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: ; ISSN: 1932-6203
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recordid: narcisknaw:oai:pure.knaw.nl:publications/935e80b7-85bb-4fbc-bd7c-7c9998857329
title: Stroking or Buzzing?: A Comparison of Somatosensory Touch Stimuli Using 7 Tesla fMRI
format: Article
creator:
  • Van der Zwaag, W.
  • Gruetter, Rolf
  • Martuzzi, Roberto
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Brain Mapping
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Mechanical Processes
  • Physical Stimulation
  • Somatosensory Cortex
  • Time Factors
  • Touch Perception
  • Young Adult
  • Comparative Study
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'T
ispartof: PLoS One, 2015, Vol.10(8), pp.urn:issn:1932-6203
description: Studying body representations in the brain helps us to understand how we humans relate to our own bodies. The in vivo mapping of the somatosensory cortex, where these representations are found, is greatly facilitated by the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to brain activation available at ultra-high field. In this study, the use of different stimulus types for somatotopic mapping of the digits at ultra-high field, specifically manual stroking and mechanical stimulation, was compared in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the brain responses. Larger positive responses in digit regions of interest were found for manual stroking than for mechanical stimulation, both in terms of average and maximum t-value and in terms of number of voxels with significant responses to the tactile stimulation. Responses to manual stroking were higher throughout the entire post-central sulcus, but the difference was especially large on its posterior wall, i.e. in Brodmann area 2. During mechanical...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: ; ISSN: 1932-6203
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 1932-6203
url: Link


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titleStroking or Buzzing?: A Comparison of Somatosensory Touch Stimuli Using 7 Tesla fMRI
creatorVan der Zwaag, W. ; Gruetter, Rolf ; Martuzzi, Roberto
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ispartofPLoS One, 2015, Vol.10(8), pp.urn:issn:1932-6203
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subjectAdult ; Brain Mapping ; Female ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Male ; Mechanical Processes ; Physical Stimulation ; Somatosensory Cortex ; Time Factors ; Touch Perception ; Young Adult ; Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'T
descriptionStudying body representations in the brain helps us to understand how we humans relate to our own bodies. The in vivo mapping of the somatosensory cortex, where these representations are found, is greatly facilitated by the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to brain activation available at ultra-high field. In this study, the use of different stimulus types for somatotopic mapping of the digits at ultra-high field, specifically manual stroking and mechanical stimulation, was compared in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the brain responses. Larger positive responses in digit regions of interest were found for manual stroking than for mechanical stimulation, both in terms of average and maximum t-value and in terms of number of voxels with significant responses to the tactile stimulation. Responses to manual stroking were higher throughout the entire post-central sulcus, but the difference was especially large on its posterior wall, i.e. in Brodmann area 2. During mechanical...
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titleStroking or Buzzing?: A Comparison of Somatosensory Touch Stimuli Using 7 Tesla fMRI
descriptionStudying body representations in the brain helps us to understand how we humans relate to our own bodies. The in vivo mapping of the somatosensory cortex, where these representations are found, is greatly facilitated by the high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to brain activation available at ultra-high field. In this study, the use of different stimulus types for somatotopic mapping of the digits at ultra-high field, specifically manual stroking and mechanical stimulation, was compared in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the brain responses. Larger positive responses in digit regions of interest were found for manual stroking than for mechanical stimulation, both in terms of average and maximum t-value and in terms of number of voxels with significant responses to the tactile stimulation. Responses to manual stroking were higher throughout the entire post-central sulcus, but the difference was especially large on its posterior wall, i.e. in Brodmann area 2. During mechanical...
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