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Parental Smoking During Pregnancy and Total and Abdominal Fat Distribution in School-age Children: the Generation R Study

Objective:Fetal smoke exposure may influence growth and body composition later in life. We examined the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children.Methods:We performed a population-based prospective cohort study amo... Full description

Journal Title: International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders 2014, Vol.38, pp.966-972
Main Author: Durmus, B.
Other Authors: Heppe, D.H.M. , Taal, H.R. , Manniesing, R. , Raat, H. , Hofman, A. , Steegers, E.A.P. , Gaillard, R. , Jaddoe, V.W.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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Quelle: NARCIS (National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System)
ID: ISSN: ; ISSN: 0307-0565
Link: http://hdl.handle.net/2066/136473
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recordid: narcisru:oai:repository.ubn.ru.nl:2066/136473
title: Parental Smoking During Pregnancy and Total and Abdominal Fat Distribution in School-age Children: the Generation R Study
format: Article
creator:
  • Durmus, B.
  • Heppe, D.H.M.
  • Taal, H.R.
  • Manniesing, R.
  • Raat, H.
  • Hofman, A.
  • Steegers, E.A.P.
  • Gaillard, R.
  • Jaddoe, V.W.
ispartof: International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders, 2014, Vol.38, pp.966-972
description: Objective:Fetal smoke exposure may influence growth and body composition later in life. We examined the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children.Methods:We performed a population-based prospective cohort study among 5243 children followed from early pregnancy onward in the Netherlands. Information about parental smoking was obtained by questionnaires during pregnancy. At the median age of 6.0 years (90% range: 5.7-7.4), we measured anthropometrics, total fat and android/gynoid fat ratio by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and preperitoneal and subcutaneous abdominal fat were measured by ultrasound.Results:The associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy were only present among girls (P-value for sex interaction
language:
source: NARCIS (National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System)
identifier: ISSN: ; ISSN: 0307-0565
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0307-0565
url: Link


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titleParental Smoking During Pregnancy and Total and Abdominal Fat Distribution in School-age Children: the Generation R Study
creatorDurmus, B. ; Heppe, D.H.M. ; Taal, H.R. ; Manniesing, R. ; Raat, H. ; Hofman, A. ; Steegers, E.A.P. ; Gaillard, R. ; Jaddoe, V.W.
ispartofInternational Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders, 2014, Vol.38, pp.966-972
identifierISSN: ; ISSN: 0307-0565
descriptionObjective:Fetal smoke exposure may influence growth and body composition later in life. We examined the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children.Methods:We performed a population-based prospective cohort study among 5243 children followed from early pregnancy onward in the Netherlands. Information about parental smoking was obtained by questionnaires during pregnancy. At the median age of 6.0 years (90% range: 5.7-7.4), we measured anthropometrics, total fat and android/gynoid fat ratio by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and preperitoneal and subcutaneous abdominal fat were measured by ultrasound.Results:The associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy were only present among girls (P-value for sex interaction<0.05). Compared with girls from mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy, those from mothers who smoked during the first trimester only had a higher android/gynoid fat ratio (difference 0.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09-0.37) s.d. scores (SDS). Girls from mothers who continued smoking throughout pregnancy had a higher body mass index (difference: 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14-0.35) SDS), total fat mass (difference: 0.23 (95% CI: 0.14-0.33) SDS), android/gynoid fat ratio (difference: 0.34 (95% CI: 0.22-0.46) SDS), subcutaneous abdominal fat (difference: 0.22 (95% CI: 0.11-0.33) SDS) and preperitoneal abdominal fat (difference: 0.20 (95% CI: 0.08-0.31) SDS). Similar associations with body fat distribution outcomes were observed for paternal smoking during pregnancy. Both continued maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of childhood overweight. The corresponding odds ratios were 1.19 (95% CI: 0.98-1.46) and 1.32 (1.10-1.58), respectively.Conclusions:Maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy are associated with an adverse body and abdominal fat distribution and increased risk of overweight in children. Similar effects of maternal and paternal smoking suggest that direct intrauterine mechanisms and common family-based lifestyle-related factors explain the associations.
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titleParental Smoking During Pregnancy and Total and Abdominal Fat Distribution in School-age Children: the Generation R Study
descriptionObjective:Fetal smoke exposure may influence growth and body composition later in life. We examined the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with total and abdominal fat distribution in school-age children.Methods:We performed a population-based prospective cohort study among 5243 children followed from early pregnancy onward in the Netherlands. Information about parental smoking was obtained by questionnaires during pregnancy. At the median age of 6.0 years (90% range: 5.7-7.4), we measured anthropometrics, total fat and android/gynoid fat ratio by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and preperitoneal and subcutaneous abdominal fat were measured by ultrasound.Results:The associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy were only present among girls (P-value for sex interaction<0.05). Compared with girls from mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy, those from mothers who smoked during the first trimester only had a higher android/gynoid fat ratio (difference 0.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09-0.37) s.d. scores (SDS). Girls from mothers who continued smoking throughout pregnancy had a higher body mass index (difference: 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14-0.35) SDS), total fat mass (difference: 0.23 (95% CI: 0.14-0.33) SDS), android/gynoid fat ratio (difference: 0.34 (95% CI: 0.22-0.46) SDS), subcutaneous abdominal fat (difference: 0.22 (95% CI: 0.11-0.33) SDS) and preperitoneal abdominal fat (difference: 0.20 (95% CI: 0.08-0.31) SDS). Similar associations with body fat distribution outcomes were observed for paternal smoking during pregnancy. Both continued maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of childhood overweight. The corresponding odds ratios were 1.19 (95% CI: 0.98-1.46) and 1.32 (1.10-1.58), respectively.Conclusions:Maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy are associated with an adverse body and abdominal fat distribution and increased risk of overweight in children. Similar effects of maternal and paternal smoking suggest that direct intrauterine mechanisms and common family-based lifestyle-related factors explain the associations.
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