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Guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency

Factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is an extremely rare hemorrhagic disorder with an approximate worldwide incidence of one per two million. With current tests, diagnosis of this disease can be made more precisely. However, factors such as the number of patients with FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), available... Full description

Journal Title: Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis 2016, Vol.27(4), pp.361-364
Main Author: Dorgalaleh, Akbar
Other Authors: Tabibian, Shadi , Hosseini, Soudabeh , Shamsizadeh, Morteza
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0957-5235 ; DOI: 10.1097/MBC.0000000000000459
Link: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00001721-201606000-00001
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recordid: ovid00001721-201606000-00001
title: Guidelines for laboratory diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency
format: Article
creator:
  • Dorgalaleh, Akbar
  • Tabibian, Shadi
  • Hosseini, Soudabeh
  • Shamsizadeh, Morteza
subjects:
  • Medicine
  • Anatomy & Physiology
ispartof: Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis, 2016, Vol.27(4), pp.361-364
description: Factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is an extremely rare hemorrhagic disorder with an approximate worldwide incidence of one per two million. With current tests, diagnosis of this disease can be made more precisely. However, factors such as the number of patients with FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), available diagnostic coagulation tests and the number of molecular studies have affected the diagnosis of FXIIID in different parts of the world. Various laboratory approaches can be used, including screening and diagnosis of the disorder in countries with a relatively high rate of FXIIID and recurrent mutation(s) with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or polymerase chain reaction-sequencing for detection of one or a few specific mutations. In other countries, two different laboratory approaches can be used, depending on available coagulation tests. In less-equipped coagulation laboratories, the clot solubility test remains the only diagnostic test for FXIIID. Even in these countries, at least one referral laboratory should perform FXIII activity and, if possible, confirmation of FXIIID by molecular analysis. In countries with well equipped coagulation laboratories, FXIII activity should be used to screen suspected FXIIID patients; more specific tests such as molecular analysis should be used for confirmation. This study suggests a simple, reliable and flexible algorithm for early diagnosis of FXIIID, and may, with one-time diagnosis of FXIIID, reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with the disorder.
language:
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identifier: ISSN: 0957-5235 ; DOI: 10.1097/MBC.0000000000000459
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0957-5235
  • 09575235
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titleGuidelines for laboratory diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency
creatorDorgalaleh, Akbar ; Tabibian, Shadi ; Hosseini, Soudabeh ; Shamsizadeh, Morteza
ispartofBlood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis, 2016, Vol.27(4), pp.361-364
identifierISSN: 0957-5235 ; DOI: 10.1097/MBC.0000000000000459
descriptionFactor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is an extremely rare hemorrhagic disorder with an approximate worldwide incidence of one per two million. With current tests, diagnosis of this disease can be made more precisely. However, factors such as the number of patients with FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), available diagnostic coagulation tests and the number of molecular studies have affected the diagnosis of FXIIID in different parts of the world. Various laboratory approaches can be used, including screening and diagnosis of the disorder in countries with a relatively high rate of FXIIID and recurrent mutation(s) with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or polymerase chain reaction-sequencing for detection of one or a few specific mutations. In other countries, two different laboratory approaches can be used, depending on available coagulation tests. In less-equipped coagulation laboratories, the clot solubility test remains the only diagnostic test for FXIIID. Even in these countries, at least one referral laboratory should perform FXIII activity and, if possible, confirmation of FXIIID by molecular analysis. In countries with well equipped coagulation laboratories, FXIII activity should be used to screen suspected FXIIID patients; more specific tests such as molecular analysis should be used for confirmation. This study suggests a simple, reliable and flexible algorithm for early diagnosis of FXIIID, and may, with one-time diagnosis of FXIIID, reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with the disorder.
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titleGuidelines for laboratory diagnosis of factor XIII deficiency
descriptionFactor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is an extremely rare hemorrhagic disorder with an approximate worldwide incidence of one per two million. With current tests, diagnosis of this disease can be made more precisely. However, factors such as the number of patients with FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), available diagnostic coagulation tests and the number of molecular studies have affected the diagnosis of FXIIID in different parts of the world. Various laboratory approaches can be used, including screening and diagnosis of the disorder in countries with a relatively high rate of FXIIID and recurrent mutation(s) with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or polymerase chain reaction-sequencing for detection of one or a few specific mutations. In other countries, two different laboratory approaches can be used, depending on available coagulation tests. In less-equipped coagulation laboratories, the clot solubility test remains the only diagnostic test for FXIIID. Even in these countries, at least one referral laboratory should perform FXIII activity and, if possible, confirmation of FXIIID by molecular analysis. In countries with well equipped coagulation laboratories, FXIII activity should be used to screen suspected FXIIID patients; more specific tests such as molecular analysis should be used for confirmation. This study suggests a simple, reliable and flexible algorithm for early diagnosis of FXIIID, and may, with one-time diagnosis of FXIIID, reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with the disorder.
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abstractFactor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is an extremely rare hemorrhagic disorder with an approximate worldwide incidence of one per two million. With current tests, diagnosis of this disease can be made more precisely. However, factors such as the number of patients with FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), available diagnostic coagulation tests and the number of molecular studies have affected the diagnosis of FXIIID in different parts of the world. Various laboratory approaches can be used, including screening and diagnosis of the disorder in countries with a relatively high rate of FXIIID and recurrent mutation(s) with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or polymerase chain reaction-sequencing for detection of one or a few specific mutations. In other countries, two different laboratory approaches can be used, depending on available coagulation tests. In less-equipped coagulation laboratories, the clot solubility test remains the only diagnostic test for FXIIID. Even in these countries, at least one referral laboratory should perform FXIII activity and, if possible, confirmation of FXIIID by molecular analysis. In countries with well equipped coagulation laboratories, FXIII activity should be used to screen suspected FXIIID patients; more specific tests such as molecular analysis should be used for confirmation. This study suggests a simple, reliable and flexible algorithm for early diagnosis of FXIIID, and may, with one-time diagnosis of FXIIID, reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with the disorder.
pubCopyright © 2016 YEAR Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
doi10.1097/MBC.0000000000000459
eissn14735733
date2016-06