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Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on spasticity after stroke

Spasticity is a common cause of long-term disability in poststroke hemiplegic patients. We investigated whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) could reduce upper-limb spasticity after a stroke. Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited for a double-blind sham-controlled cross-ov... Full description

Journal Title: NeuroReport 2015, Vol.26(10), pp.561-566
Main Author: Kim, Hyun, Dae
Other Authors: Shin, Cheol, Ji , Jung, Young, Seungsoo , Jung, Young, Tae-Min , Kim, Young, Deog
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ID: ISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000388
Link: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00001756-201507010-00002
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title: Effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on spasticity after stroke
format: Article
creator:
  • Kim, Hyun, Dae
  • Shin, Cheol, Ji
  • Jung, Young, Seungsoo
  • Jung, Young, Tae-Min
  • Kim, Young, Deog
subjects:
  • Hot Spots
  • Wrist
  • Stroke
  • Muscles
  • Spasticity
  • Emg
  • Neurology & Neuropathology
ispartof: NeuroReport, 2015, Vol.26(10), pp.561-566
description: Spasticity is a common cause of long-term disability in poststroke hemiplegic patients. We investigated whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) could reduce upper-limb spasticity after a stroke. Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited for a double-blind sham-controlled cross-over design study. A single session of iTBS or sham stimulation was delivered on the motor hotspot of the affected flexor carpi radialis muscle in a random and counterbalanced order with a 1-week interval. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), modified Tardieu scale (MTS), H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio, peak torque (PT), peak torque angle (PTA), work of affected wrist flexor, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity of the flexor carpi radialis muscle were measured before, immediately after, 30 min after, and 1 week after iTBS or sham stimulation. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and intervention for the MAS, MTS, PT, PTA, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity (P
language:
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identifier: ISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000388
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0959-4965
  • 09594965
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titleEffects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on spasticity after stroke
creatorKim, Hyun, Dae ; Shin, Cheol, Ji ; Jung, Young, Seungsoo ; Jung, Young, Tae-Min ; Kim, Young, Deog
ispartofNeuroReport, 2015, Vol.26(10), pp.561-566
identifierISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000388
descriptionSpasticity is a common cause of long-term disability in poststroke hemiplegic patients. We investigated whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) could reduce upper-limb spasticity after a stroke. Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited for a double-blind sham-controlled cross-over design study. A single session of iTBS or sham stimulation was delivered on the motor hotspot of the affected flexor carpi radialis muscle in a random and counterbalanced order with a 1-week interval. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), modified Tardieu scale (MTS), H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio, peak torque (PT), peak torque angle (PTA), work of affected wrist flexor, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity of the flexor carpi radialis muscle were measured before, immediately after, 30 min after, and 1 week after iTBS or sham stimulation. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and intervention for the MAS, MTS, PT, PTA, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity (P<0.05), indicating that these parameters were significantly improved by iTBS compared with sham stimulation. However, the H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio and work were not affected. MAS and MTS significantly improved for at least 30 min after iTBS, but the other parameters only improved immediately after iTBS (P<0.05). In conclusion, iTBS on the affected hemisphere may help to reduce poststroke spasticity transiently.
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subjectHot Spots ; Wrist ; Stroke ; Muscles ; Spasticity ; Emg ; Neurology & Neuropathology;
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titleEffects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on spasticity after stroke
descriptionSpasticity is a common cause of long-term disability in poststroke hemiplegic patients. We investigated whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) could reduce upper-limb spasticity after a stroke. Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited for a double-blind sham-controlled cross-over design study. A single session of iTBS or sham stimulation was delivered on the motor hotspot of the affected flexor carpi radialis muscle in a random and counterbalanced order with a 1-week interval. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), modified Tardieu scale (MTS), H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio, peak torque (PT), peak torque angle (PTA), work of affected wrist flexor, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity of the flexor carpi radialis muscle were measured before, immediately after, 30 min after, and 1 week after iTBS or sham stimulation. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and intervention for the MAS, MTS, PT, PTA, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity (P<0.05), indicating that these parameters were significantly improved by iTBS compared with sham stimulation. However, the H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio and work were not affected. MAS and MTS significantly improved for at least 30 min after iTBS, but the other parameters only improved immediately after iTBS (P<0.05). In conclusion, iTBS on the affected hemisphere may help to reduce poststroke spasticity transiently.
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abstractSpasticity is a common cause of long-term disability in poststroke hemiplegic patients. We investigated whether intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) could reduce upper-limb spasticity after a stroke. Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited for a double-blind sham-controlled cross-over design study. A single session of iTBS or sham stimulation was delivered on the motor hotspot of the affected flexor carpi radialis muscle in a random and counterbalanced order with a 1-week interval. Modified Ashworth scale (MAS), modified Tardieu scale (MTS), H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio, peak torque (PT), peak torque angle (PTA), work of affected wrist flexor, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity of the flexor carpi radialis muscle were measured before, immediately after, 30 min after, and 1 week after iTBS or sham stimulation. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and intervention for the MAS, MTS, PT, PTA, and rectified integrated electromyographic activity (P<0.05), indicating that these parameters were significantly improved by iTBS compared with sham stimulation. However, the H-wave/M-wave amplitude ratio and work were not affected. MAS and MTS significantly improved for at least 30 min after iTBS, but the other parameters only improved immediately after iTBS (P<0.05). In conclusion, iTBS on the affected hemisphere may help to reduce poststroke spasticity transiently.
pub© 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
doi10.1097/WNR.0000000000000388
eissn1473558X
date2015-07