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Alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals

Trait anxiety has been shown to cause significant impairments on attentional tasks. Current research has identified alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals. Here, we further investigated the underlying alpha band frequency differences between low-trait a... Full description

Journal Title: NeuroReport 2018, Vol.29(2), pp.79-83
Main Author: Ward, T., Richard
Other Authors: Smith, L., Shelby , Kraus, T., Brian , Allen, V., Anna , Moses, A., Michael , Simon-Dack, L., Stephanie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000915
Link: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00001756-201801020-00003
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recordid: ovid00001756-201801020-00003
title: Alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals
format: Article
creator:
  • Ward, T., Richard
  • Smith, L., Shelby
  • Kraus, T., Brian
  • Allen, V., Anna
  • Moses, A., Michael
  • Simon-Dack, L., Stephanie
subjects:
  • Anxiety -- Analysis
  • Task Analysis
ispartof: NeuroReport, 2018, Vol.29(2), pp.79-83
description: Trait anxiety has been shown to cause significant impairments on attentional tasks. Current research has identified alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals. Here, we further investigated the underlying alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals during their resting state and the completion of an inhibition executive functioning task. Using human participants and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings, we measured alpha band frequency in individuals both high and low in trait anxiety during their resting state, and while they completed an Eriksen Flanker Task. Results indicated that high-trait anxious individuals exhibit a desynchronization in alpha band frequency from a resting state to when they complete the Eriksen Flanker Task. This suggests that high-trait anxious individuals maintain fewer attentional resources at rest and must martial resources for task performance as compared with low-trait anxious individuals, who appear to maintain stable cognitive resources between rest and task performance. These findings add to the cognitive neuroscience literature surrounding the role of alpha band frequency in low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000915
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0959-4965
  • 09594965
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titleAlpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals
creatorWard, T., Richard ; Smith, L., Shelby ; Kraus, T., Brian ; Allen, V., Anna ; Moses, A., Michael ; Simon-Dack, L., Stephanie
ispartofNeuroReport, 2018, Vol.29(2), pp.79-83
identifierISSN: 0959-4965 ; DOI: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000915
descriptionTrait anxiety has been shown to cause significant impairments on attentional tasks. Current research has identified alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals. Here, we further investigated the underlying alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals during their resting state and the completion of an inhibition executive functioning task. Using human participants and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings, we measured alpha band frequency in individuals both high and low in trait anxiety during their resting state, and while they completed an Eriksen Flanker Task. Results indicated that high-trait anxious individuals exhibit a desynchronization in alpha band frequency from a resting state to when they complete the Eriksen Flanker Task. This suggests that high-trait anxious individuals maintain fewer attentional resources at rest and must martial resources for task performance as compared with low-trait anxious individuals, who appear to maintain stable cognitive resources between rest and task performance. These findings add to the cognitive neuroscience literature surrounding the role of alpha band frequency in low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals.
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abstractTrait anxiety has been shown to cause significant impairments on attentional tasks. Current research has identified alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals. Here, we further investigated the underlying alpha band frequency differences between low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals during their resting state and the completion of an inhibition executive functioning task. Using human participants and quantitative electroencephalographic recordings, we measured alpha band frequency in individuals both high and low in trait anxiety during their resting state, and while they completed an Eriksen Flanker Task. Results indicated that high-trait anxious individuals exhibit a desynchronization in alpha band frequency from a resting state to when they complete the Eriksen Flanker Task. This suggests that high-trait anxious individuals maintain fewer attentional resources at rest and must martial resources for task performance as compared with low-trait anxious individuals, who appear to maintain stable cognitive resources between rest and task performance. These findings add to the cognitive neuroscience literature surrounding the role of alpha band frequency in low-trait and high-trait anxious individuals.
pub© 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
doi10.1097/WNR.0000000000000915
eissn1473558X
date2018-01