schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Severe Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Severe obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments are limited in effectiveness and lack wi... Full description

Journal Title: Circulation 2013, Vol.128(15), pp.1689-1712
Main Author: Kelly, S., Aaron
Other Authors: Barlow, E., Sarah , Rao, H., Goutham , Inge, L., Thomas , Hayman, M., Laura , Steinberger, J., Julia , Urbina, R., Elaine , Ewing, R., Linda , Daniels, R., Stephen
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182a5cfb3
Link: http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00003017-201310080-00017
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: ovid00003017-201310080-00017
title: Severe Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
format: Article
creator:
  • Kelly, S., Aaron
  • Barlow, E., Sarah
  • Rao, H., Goutham
  • Inge, L., Thomas
  • Hayman, M., Laura
  • Steinberger, J., Julia
  • Urbina, R., Elaine
  • Ewing, R., Linda
  • Daniels, R., Stephen
subjects:
  • AHA Scientific Statements
  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Obesity
  • Risk Factors
  • American Heart Association
  • Obesity, Morbid -- Epidemiology
ispartof: Circulation, 2013, Vol.128(15), pp.1689-1712
description: Severe obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments are limited in effectiveness and lack widespread availability. Lifestyle modification/behavior-based treatment interventions in youth with severe obesity have demonstrated modest improvement in body mass index status, but participants have generally remained severely obese and often regained weight after the conclusion of the treatment programs. The role of medical management is minimal, because only 1 medication is currently approved for the treatment of obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has generally been effective in reducing body mass index and improving cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors; however, reports of long-term outcomes are few, many youth with severe obesity do not qualify for surgery, and access is limited by lack of insurance coverage. To begin to address these challenges, the purposes of this scientific statement are to (1) provide justification for and recommend a standardized definition of severe obesity in children and adolescents; (2) raise awareness of this serious and growing problem by summarizing the current literature in this area in terms of the epidemiology and trends, associated health risks (immediate and long-term), and challenges and shortcomings of currently available treatment options; and (3) highlight areas in need of future research. Innovative behavior-based treatment, minimally invasive procedures, and medications currently under development all need to be evaluated for their efficacy and safety in this group of patients with high medical and psychosocial risks.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182a5cfb3
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0009-7322
  • 00097322
url: Link


@attributes
ID1728693197
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid00003017-201310080-00017
sourceidovid
recordidTN_ovid00003017-201310080-00017
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid1443409585
galeid346400867
display
typearticle
titleSevere Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
creatorKelly, S., Aaron ; Barlow, E., Sarah ; Rao, H., Goutham ; Inge, L., Thomas ; Hayman, M., Laura ; Steinberger, J., Julia ; Urbina, R., Elaine ; Ewing, R., Linda ; Daniels, R., Stephen
ispartofCirculation, 2013, Vol.128(15), pp.1689-1712
identifierISSN: 0009-7322 ; DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182a5cfb3
descriptionSevere obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments are limited in effectiveness and lack widespread availability. Lifestyle modification/behavior-based treatment interventions in youth with severe obesity have demonstrated modest improvement in body mass index status, but participants have generally remained severely obese and often regained weight after the conclusion of the treatment programs. The role of medical management is minimal, because only 1 medication is currently approved for the treatment of obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has generally been effective in reducing body mass index and improving cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors; however, reports of long-term outcomes are few, many youth with severe obesity do not qualify for surgery, and access is limited by lack of insurance coverage. To begin to address these challenges, the purposes of this scientific statement are to (1) provide justification for and recommend a standardized definition of severe obesity in children and adolescents; (2) raise awareness of this serious and growing problem by summarizing the current literature in this area in terms of the epidemiology and trends, associated health risks (immediate and long-term), and challenges and shortcomings of currently available treatment options; and (3) highlight areas in need of future research. Innovative behavior-based treatment, minimally invasive procedures, and medications currently under development all need to be evaluated for their efficacy and safety in this group of patients with high medical and psychosocial risks.
source
subjectAHA Scientific Statements ; Adolescents ; Children ; Obesity ; Risk Factors ; American Heart Association ; Obesity, Morbid -- Epidemiology;
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=n&CSC=Y&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovft&AN=00003017-201310080-00017$$EView_record_at_Wolters_Kluwer_Health_Ovid_Technologies
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttp://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutOvid.html$$EView_Wolters_Kluwer_Health,_Lippincott,_Williams_&_Wilkins_Copyright_Statement
search
creatorcontrib
0Kelly, S, Aaron
1Barlow, E, Sarah
2Rao, H, Goutham
3Inge, L, Thomas
4Hayman, M, Laura
5Steinberger, J, Julia
6Urbina, R, Elaine
7Ewing, R, Linda
8Daniels, R, Stephen
titleSevere Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
descriptionSevere obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments are limited in effectiveness and lack widespread availability. Lifestyle modification/behavior-based treatment interventions in youth with severe obesity have demonstrated modest improvement in body mass index status, but participants have generally remained severely obese and often regained weight after the conclusion of the treatment programs. The role of medical management is minimal, because only 1 medication is currently approved for the treatment of obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has generally been effective in reducing body mass index and improving cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors; however, reports of long-term outcomes are few, many youth with severe obesity do not qualify for surgery, and access is limited by lack of insurance coverage. To begin to address these challenges, the purposes of this scientific statement are to (1) provide justification for and recommend a standardized definition of severe obesity in children and adolescents; (2) raise awareness of this serious and growing problem by summarizing the current literature in this area in terms of the epidemiology and trends, associated health risks (immediate and long-term), and challenges and shortcomings of currently available treatment options; and (3) highlight areas in need of future research. Innovative behavior-based treatment, minimally invasive procedures, and medications currently under development all need to be evaluated for their efficacy and safety in this group of patients with high medical and psychosocial risks.
general
010.1161/CIR.0b013e3182a5cfb3
1© 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association, Inc.
2Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - Journals
sourceidovid
recordidovid00003017-201310080-00017
issn
00009-7322
100097322
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2013
addtitleCirculation
searchscopeovid
scopeovid
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[galeid, subject, date, eissn, pqid]
sort
titleSevere Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
authorKelly, S., Aaron ; Barlow, E., Sarah ; Rao, H., Goutham ; Inge, L., Thomas ; Hayman, M., Laura ; Steinberger, J., Julia ; Urbina, R., Elaine ; Ewing, R., Linda ; Daniels, R., Stephen
creationdate20131000
facets
frbrgroupid8024603534776765091
frbrtype5
newrecords20170719
creationdate2013
collectionLippincott Williams & Wilkins Journals (Wolters Kluwer Health)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Kelly, S., Aaron
1Barlow, E., Sarah
2Rao, H., Goutham
3Inge, L., Thomas
4Hayman, M., Laura
5Steinberger, J., Julia
6Urbina, R., Elaine
7Ewing, R., Linda
8Daniels, R., Stephen
jtitleCirculation
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Kelly
1Barlow
2Rao
3Inge
4Hayman
5Steinberger
6Urbina
7Ewing
8Daniels
aufirst
0Aaron
1Sarah
2Goutham
3Thomas
4Laura
5Julia
6Elaine
7Linda
8Stephen
auinitm
0S.
1E.
2H.
3L.
4M.
5J.
6R.
au
0Kelly, S., Aaron
1Barlow, E., Sarah
2Rao, H., Goutham
3Inge, L., Thomas
4Hayman, M., Laura
5Steinberger, J., Julia
6Urbina, R., Elaine
7Ewing, R., Linda
8Daniels, R., Stephen
atitleSevere Obesity in Children and Adolescents: Identification, Associated Health Risks, and Treatment Approaches: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association
jtitleCirculation
risdate201310
volume128
issue15
spage1689
epage1712
pages1689-1712
issn0009-7322
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractSevere obesity afflicts between 4% and 6% of all youth in the United States, and the prevalence is increasing. Despite the serious immediate and long-term cardiovascular, metabolic, and other health consequences of severe pediatric obesity, current treatments are limited in effectiveness and lack widespread availability. Lifestyle modification/behavior-based treatment interventions in youth with severe obesity have demonstrated modest improvement in body mass index status, but participants have generally remained severely obese and often regained weight after the conclusion of the treatment programs. The role of medical management is minimal, because only 1 medication is currently approved for the treatment of obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has generally been effective in reducing body mass index and improving cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors; however, reports of long-term outcomes are few, many youth with severe obesity do not qualify for surgery, and access is limited by lack of insurance coverage. To begin to address these challenges, the purposes of this scientific statement are to (1) provide justification for and recommend a standardized definition of severe obesity in children and adolescents; (2) raise awareness of this serious and growing problem by summarizing the current literature in this area in terms of the epidemiology and trends, associated health risks (immediate and long-term), and challenges and shortcomings of currently available treatment options; and (3) highlight areas in need of future research. Innovative behavior-based treatment, minimally invasive procedures, and medications currently under development all need to be evaluated for their efficacy and safety in this group of patients with high medical and psychosocial risks.
pub© 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association, Inc.
doi10.1161/CIR.0b013e3182a5cfb3
eissn15244539
date2013-10-08